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Posted: 9/12/2010 10:03:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2010 10:05:16 AM EDT by Magoo6541]
A co-worker and his brother started a fairly successful company. They're looking at buying an airplane and they're hooked on a King Air. They want something with a larger cabin so I'm thinking it'll be at least a -200 or maybe a -300/-350. They've talked to me about flying for them, which is great.

My deal is that I'm a fairly new commercial pilot with 250 hours, 110 in multi with a complex and high performance endorsements. I've been looking online to get info about how the type rating work for the 300/350 aircraft. I know some aircraft share types, I believe some of the Gulfstream aircraft share the same type rating, does that work with King Airs also?

The biggest hurdle is my lack of hours, I'm thinking that I'll be uninsurable at this point. Is this necessarily true? How does the cost of the school generally work? Does the owner of the aircraft usually foot the bill or should I start looking at schools? I guess it depends on if the 300/350 share the same type rating. I've read you could get a single pilot type, is there a pic/sic type?

Thanks

ETA: FWIW, I'm going to recommend to them to consider looking for a more qualified pilot, I'm honored that they've asked me, but i think it may be in their best interest.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:12:13 AM EDT
You are not insurable in a King Air. Would need more info as to what size King Air they would need. I'm sure they know they will spend over a mil on a 200, and more than that on a 300. The King Airs are all single pilot, the 200 does not require a type and you could right seat it and log time occasionally.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:54:32 AM EDT
The King- Air 300 and the 350 share the same type rating. SimmuFlight at DFW and Flight Safety in ICT have initial courses. It seems to me that they were charging about 18,000 dollars for the 3 week course 9 years ago. The price may have changed up or down with this economy. As a rule the owner of the aircraft pays for the course. With your time you can be insured but it will be very expensive. The 300/350 can be single pilot operated however most companies use 2 pilots. I have flown the the 300 for 9 years and have about 4500 hrs in it and we operate it with 2 pilots. The aircraft is a great airplane and is not hard to fly. That being said the first year I was flying it, I was over whelmed with the systems, speed and work load. It took me about 2 years to become completely comfortable in it. I may be a bit slower than others. The 200 is very close to the 300/350. Smaller engines and less weight are the biggest things. The 300 is like driving a small, powerful sports car. The 350 is like flying Mom's Buick with a very strong engine.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 2:18:37 PM EDT
I would suggest like the others have said a B200. And yes I think with your hours you would be nuts flying it by yourself. While its an easy and great plane to fly its not a 172 or Warrior. They need to get a pro in there and then you can ride right seat and get some hours in it. Have fun!
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 6:58:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2010 7:09:05 PM EDT by oldcatdriver]
Hire a high time older guy that's a CFI with a lot of King Air time to be the guy for the insurance company. Get yourself in the left seat, log a bunch of dual and when you get to the point that you, the owners and the insurance company are all happy you can become the "man".

Another word to the wise is to make sure that they get completely educated on what is involved with the continuing maintenance program of any King Air. I fly a B90, a 200, and a B200. In the last year going through the phase inspections, landing gear overhaul and doing a hot section on one engine the 200 owner is going to spend well over $200,000. Get a good prebuy inspection from a neutral party that really knows King Airs or you can live to regret it.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 7:05:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2010 7:10:34 PM EDT by bad_frank]
citation V & some ultras are now welling for what king air 200's did recently. don't know what kind of flights you will be making, but unless it just totally doesn't fit the profile, there is no reason not to get a jet. both of those models can be operated single pilot with a waiver, which will give the operator some latitude as to how the right seat is occupied. for example, three years ago, i was able to get a guy with your quals named on my insurance for a 560 with a $50 million liability policy because i had the single pilot waiver.

even if you do go with a king air, you are a LONG way from being insurable, especially on policies with high liability limits.

king airs and citations are great airplanes with a long history of fantastic service. there has never been a better time for your buddy to buy one.

good luck figuring out how to make a job out of this.

eta: employer should pay for recurrent/type school, and don't count yourself out yet. as the guy above me posted, perhaps you can get a cfi/mentor pilot to train you in the plane. at the rates that most corporate operators fly, it may take you a few years to get the hours in for insurance, but it may be doable.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 10:05:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By oldcatdriver:
Hire a high time older guy that's a CFI with a lot of King Air time to be the guy for the insurance company. Get yourself in the left seat, log a bunch of dual and when you get to the point that you, the owners and the insurance company are all happy you can become the "man".

Another word to the wise is to make sure that they get completely educated on what is involved with the continuing maintenance program of any King Air. I fly a B90, a 200, and a B200. In the last year going through the phase inspections, landing gear overhaul and doing a hot section on one engine the 200 owner is going to spend well over $200,000. Get a good prebuy inspection from a neutral party that really knows King Airs or you can live to regret it.

I see you are in SC. If your friends are buying one take it to Stevens Aviation in KGYH in Greenville for a prebuy. We used to take the C90 I flew there and these guys pretty much work on nothing but King Airs. There is no better place.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 5:23:11 AM EDT
Like you mentioned I don't think you can get insured with your times.

The King Air B200 is not a fighter jet or anything but if being flown single
pilot, it's really too much airplane for your experience level.

After attending the King Air 200 Initial class at Simuflite (or Flight Safety) and a year or two in the right seat with
an experienced PIC you should be good to go.

Maybe those guys would hire you as a copilot then you could learn the plane and the job,
under the guidence of a more experienced pilot.

The King Air 200 or 300/350 are awesome airplanes and would be a very good choice for any company
needing regional travel with the occasional long distance trip.

I've been teaching guys to fly the King Air 200 since 1997 so let me know if you have any questions.

Fly safe,

EMSflyer

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 7:40:45 AM EDT
Thanks for the replys. I'm currently trying to get some right seat time in a 200. Just waiting on the pilot to give me a call back.

My buddy is around 6-12 months from actually pulling the trigger on this but it may happen sooner than later.
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