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Posted: 9/12/2010 10:03:34 AM EDT
I would like to install a sump pump in my basement.

The pump I picked up it about 6" in diameter at the base, and will draw water down to about 3/8".

I'd like to install the pump below floor level to allow water to pool there to be pumped out.

I've never cut into concrete before, so I come here asking what is the best way to cut a hole 6" in diameter, and 2-3" deep? The floor is over 100 years old.

Thanks
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 10:17:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2010 10:18:19 AM EDT by Voodoobadger]
You don't calculate the hole required by the diameter of the sump pump.

The pump must run for a minumum amount of time in order not to burn out the motor from constant starting and stopping. And there has to be at least an amount of water to push past the check valve or it will cycle on & off forever.
You will require a "Sump Crock". This is a plastic basin approxiately 18-24" in diameter and about 24-30" deep. They are available @ any Home Depot or Lowes store.

It works like this- The water drains into the sump crock filling it about 2/3's. The float switch will then turn the pump on and pump the water out. The pump should drain the crock in anywhere from 10 seconds to a minute. Then the pump rests until the the water level rises again.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 10:53:31 AM EDT
Thanks for responding....it's obvious I have a lot more reading to do on the topic.
Originally Posted By Voodoobadger:
You don't calculate the hole required by the diameter of the sump pump.

The pump must run for a minumum amount of time in order not to burn out the motor from constant starting and stopping. And there has to be at least an amount of water to push past the check valve or it will cycle on & off forever.
You will require a "Sump Crock". This is a plastic basin approxiately 18-24" in diameter and about 24-30" deep. They are available @ any Home Depot or Lowes store.

It works like this- The water drains into the sump crock filling it about 2/3's. The float switch will then turn the pump on and pump the water out. The pump should drain the crock in anywhere from 10 seconds to a minute. Then the pump rests until the the water level rises again.


Link Posted: 9/12/2010 12:33:15 PM EDT
if your near Madison WI I can drill up to a 8 inch hole for you.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 2:03:39 PM EDT
If the floor is really 100 years old, it won't be hard. A lot of times, they used ash or clinkers for aggregate back then. It made for thin, brittle concrete.
If the floor was poured after the house was built...
Beg, borrow or rent a hammer drill. Outline a 2' X 2' box. Dig a pit big enough to hold the above referenced plastic liner. Back fill with gravel. Cemet the last two inches
to level with the floor.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 12:33:20 PM EDT
Rent a core drill with the correct diameter bit. This can get pricey but will make a perfect hole and then simply remove the needed dirt.

The advantage to doing it this way is speed and cleanliness. You'll need a water hose and a good sized shop vac while running the core drill.

The Core drill we have at work will handle a 12" bit but I've seen 24" bits at rental stores.

If you've never used one or don't know anyone that has, that can help you operate it ask the guys at the rental store if they can show you how to properly use it, They are very powerful and are very dangerous if you don't know what you are doing.

Jason
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:16:33 PM EDT
You cut a 2'x2'(or larger) hole with a cut saw or grinder and dig out enough to fit the pit liner. Pour new concrete to patch.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 8:16:59 PM EDT
may be this thread will help

what tool to cut through concrete slab
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