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Posted: 2/17/2006 7:04:56 AM EDT
I'm trying to prepare a Sunday School class on Church History.

Summarizing 2,000 years of history in about 13 lessons is a challenge. Right now I'm thinking about having one class as introduction and then dividing the class up into focusing on the 12 greatest events. Right now here are the 12 I'm considering:

1. Pentecost and Paul's Missionary Journeys
2. Roman Persecution
3. Constantine
4. Charlemagne and the birth of the Holy Roman Empire
5. The Schism between the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox Churches
6. The Crusades
7. Jerome, Wyclif and other attempts at translating the Bible into popular languages (maybe include effect of printing press)
8. Luther, Zwingli and Calvin - the Reformation
9. Henry VII and the birth of the Anglican Church
10. The Enlightenment
11. The 19th Century Mission Movement
12. The Effects of Darwinism and Post-Modernism

What say ye?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 7:53:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wdsman:
I'm trying to prepare a Sunday School class on Church History.

Summarizing 2,000 years of history in about 13 lessons is a challenge. Right now I'm thinking about having one class as introduction and then dividing the class up into focusing on the 12 greatest events. Right now here are the 12 I'm considering:

1. Pentecost and Paul's Missionary Journeys
2. Roman Persecution
3. Constantine
4. Charlemagne and the birth of the Holy Roman Empire
5. The Schism between the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox Churches
6. The Crusades
7. Jerome, Wyclif and other attempts at translating the Bible into popular languages (maybe include effect of printing press)
8. Luther, Zwingli and Calvin - the Reformation
9. Henry VII and the birth of the Anglican Church
10. The Enlightenment
11. The 19th Century Mission Movement
12. The Effects of Darwinism and Post-Modernism

What say ye?





Gosh, I think it would be a lot more useful to learn about events recorded in the Bible . . .
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:00:10 AM EDT
Bladeswitcher,

This class will be in addition to about 5 other classes on the Bible. It's for people who want answers to questions like:

Why are there so many denominations?
Where did this belief come from?

FWIW: Though I called it a Sunday School class to give some idea of audience, perspective and content it will probably actually be taught on Wednesday night.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 1:57:58 PM EDT
You've covered the basics. You might want to add some more depth by adding the following:

(1) missionary journeys to the Germanic and Slavic tribes (i.e. conversion of German states, England, Ireland, Russia) - explains how Chrisitanity spread beyond the boundaries of the Roman Empire.

(2) Church Councils - Chalcedon, Nicea, etc. Each one was in response to a particular heresy, and defined the doctrine of the trinity, etc. I would really suggest adding something like this. A lot of new age ideas that are coming into Christianity are nothing more than repeats of ancient heresies.

(3) Islamic Conquests - both the pre-Crusade conquests of the Byzantine Empire as well as the post-crusade rise of the Ottoman Turks. Puts the Crusades into perspective.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:59:30 AM EDT
The Resurrection is the greatest event in history, not just church history.

After that, I would go with the Reformation, which started us on the road back to a pre-Roman faith.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 7:33:26 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 8:32:45 PM EDT
which "Church"?

Example: Henry VII splitting off from the catholic church, declaring himself to be answerable directly to god and not the pope, and forming the anglican church. Great moment or not? Great if you're protestant. Not so great a moment for the catholics.

I know thats in the list, I'm just throwing it out as an example. Maybe narrowing the focus of your course would help you select topics to cover in your limited amount of time. Heck, I know college profs that wouldn't even TRY to cover all that in a semester, and thats having 3 hours of class time each week, more if they run late.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:49:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle:
which "Church"?

Example: Henry VII splitting off from the catholic church, declaring himself to be answerable directly to god and not the pope, and forming the anglican church. Great moment or not? Great if you're protestant. Not so great a moment for the catholics.

I know thats in the list, I'm just throwing it out as an example. Maybe narrowing the focus of your course would help you select topics to cover in your limited amount of time. Heck, I know college profs that wouldn't even TRY to cover all that in a semester, and thats having 3 hours of class time each week, more if they run late.



I am trying to cover the history of the whole kit and kaboodle (Catholic and Protestant). I'm defining "Great" as significant.

The reason college prof's won't cover the whole thing is because of the detail expected in a college course. I would rather give a broader general view than get into any great detail. I may break it down later, but I believe a general outline is more important at this stage.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 6:11:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle:
which "Church"?

Example: Henry VII splitting off from the catholic church, declaring himself to be answerable directly to god and not the pope, and forming the anglican church. Great moment or not? Great if you're protestant. Not so great a moment for the catholics.




And that also raises the question of how Anglican Protestantism differs from the results of the Reformation over on the Continent (Luther, etc.).

When I was in England I went into a couple of churches and wondered, "Is this a Catholic church?" There was a crucifix and a schedule with masses. Then I started learning the history and realized that the birth of the Anglican church was driven more by politics (and the pursuit of a male heir) than by reformed theology.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 10:11:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:

Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle:
which "Church"?

Example: Henry VII splitting off from the catholic church, declaring himself to be answerable directly to god and not the pope, and forming the anglican church. Great moment or not? Great if you're protestant. Not so great a moment for the catholics.




And that also raises the question of how Anglican Protestantism differs from the results of the Reformation over on the Continent (Luther, etc.).

When I was in England I went into a couple of churches and wondered, "Is this a Catholic church?" There was a crucifix and a schedule with masses. Then I started learning the history and realized that the birth of the Anglican church was driven more by politics (and the pursuit of a male heir) than by reformed theology.



Yeah, I've heard Anglicans called "Catholics who flunked Latin."

Understanding the history helps understand where our differences come from and also helps us to see our common ground.
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