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Posted: 2/28/2006 7:13:57 PM EDT
I'm rebuilding an old trailer, hopefully will be done this weekend. Which leads me to the question of

How to protect the metal from rusting? Its got to be something I can do myself. I was thinking one of those roll/brush-on bedliners (Rino being one brand, but I know there are others that are cheaper and better since you're not paying for a name).

I doubt it'll ever see saltwater (only a 14' runabout, and I'm in the middle of MO -- kinda far from any saltwater).

What's my best choice?
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 7:27:46 PM EDT
I've never done it, but I have a friend who owns a rhino lining type shop, he says it is really good for boat trailers. I put my boat in saltwater often, and was going to get him to spray mine, but bought a new galvenized trailer instead.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 8:41:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/28/2006 8:42:55 PM EDT by dkhntr04]
Herculiner is the only way to go roll-on. I have done my bed, winch bumper, and rocker panels with it. The bed I did with 3-4 coats and is nicer in my opinion than Line-x or Rhino. I got 3 gallons on sale and with rebate for $45 per gallon.

Por-15 paint is an excellent paint to use on rusted or clean metal. It is a moisure cure epoxy and is super hard and durable. I have used it several times and absolutelt love it. It is $50 quart but well worth it.
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 6:05:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dkhntr04:
Herculiner is the only way to go roll-on. I have done my bed, winch bumper, and rocker panels with it. The bed I did with 3-4 coats and is nicer in my opinion than Line-x or Rhino. I got 3 gallons on sale and with rebate for $45 per gallon.

Por-15 paint is an excellent paint to use on rusted or clean metal. It is a moisure cure epoxy and is super hard and durable. I have used it several times and absolutelt love it. It is $50 quart but well worth it.



Think typical 70's boat trailer, sized for a 14' runabout, made from 2" chanel with a 2" square tube tongue -- How much herculiner would I need to give it a couple of coats? I'm guessing a gallon would be more than enough, but I don't know how far a gallon goes.


I've heard good things about Por-15, but I think it'd be a little too expensive.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:20:12 PM EDT
I'd strip it down and have it hot dipped galvanized. Probably wouldn't cost that much and it'd be permanent.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 8:36:51 PM EDT
POR-15 all the way. I've used it on subframe connectors, my boat trailer, and various other car and misc parts. Just paint it on with a paintbrush and let it dry. It looks like it's gonna come out like crap when your putting it on with a paint brush but trust me when it dries it's smooth as silk. Awesome stuff!!
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 9:31:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Blue84S10:
I'd strip it down and have it hot dipped galvanized. Probably wouldn't cost that much and it'd be permanent.



Yeah, that'd be nice. There's nowhere around here that can do it.
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 8:06:39 AM EDT

How much herculiner would I need to give it a couple of coats? I'm guessing a gallon would be more than enough, but I don't know how far a gallon goes.


I really couldn't tell you off hand. About 1/3rd of a gallon did 2 coats on my rocker panels, and undercoated about 8-12" up on the back sides of the panels on a '93 F150. I'd suggest getting a gallon if it is on sale, a quart probably would not be enough. Anyways the stuff is great for everything. I've coated a basketball hoop poll for my folks, and some other little stuff. It might be good to put on the floor in your boat too. I'll give you a lot more grip and it wont wear off like paint.

POR-15 is like liquid gold. You need to top coat it, but that stuff will almost never rust through. That might be better since the rough surface of the bedliner could pick up seeweed or aquatic hijackers. The downside to Herculiner is that it can be hard to clean and fades a bit, but the UV topcoat helps a ton with both of those.
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