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Posted: 2/21/2006 11:57:42 AM EDT
Saw on the news this morning that some idiot in a Ferrari (news didn't know but thought it was an F50 or something that costs somewhere between $500,000 and $1 million; I don't know Ferraris) lost control and crashed through a telephone pole, splitting the car in two. The engine ended up on one side of the street while what was left of the car (including the cockpit which was amazingly intact) came to rest on the other side.

Even more incredible is that the driver apparently ran away, fearing he'd be arrested! I think there was also a passenger who might've gotten a minor injury. LEOs on the scene figured they'd find two bodies in the car, but all they found was deployed air bags in the driver's compartment.

Power was, of course, out in a number of homes. Happened around 06:30 PST today.

Oh, what the idle rich will do....
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 12:04:14 PM EDT
Gotta love a good cage.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 3:56:38 PM EDT
If it wasn't stolen then the cops will just go to the guys house. Just because you can buy a Ferrari doesn't mean you have the brains to drive it.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:41:10 PM EDT
yea, it was an Enzo. I heard something about the driver running away, but the owner was a passanger at the time. Owner claimed her let some german guy drive it...

sounds like some serious BS if its true, and some serious BS if its not.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 11:55:10 PM EDT
Enzo > $1,000,000



Now, how does one go about calling the insurance company about this?
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 1:02:56 AM EDT
Dear Geico Insurance.

I broke my little Ferrari. Can you please repalce it before my mom finds out about my 200 mph crash.

_________________________


Link Posted: 2/22/2006 1:51:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Colt_SBR:
Dear Geico Insurance Lloyd's of London.

I broke my little Ferrari. Can you please repalce it before my mom finds out about my 200 mph crash.

Fixed it for ya

_________________________

img.photobucket.com/albums/v323/Colt_SBR/57985sm.gif

Link Posted: 2/22/2006 2:53:38 AM EDT
Update.

Speed was approx 130.

Drivers mouth was bloodied, blood on drivers air bag, none on pass side. Blew a .09 BAC (legally drunk)

Cops find the driver of the mercedes he's pretty f-ed also.

2nd enzo crash I seen where the car tore in half.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 1:05:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kato4moto:
Saw on the news this morning that some idiot in a Ferrari (news didn't know but thought it was an F50 or something that costs somewhere between $500,000 and $1 million; I don't know Ferraris) lost control and crashed through a telephone pole, splitting the car in two. The engine ended up on one side of the street while what was left of the car (including the cockpit which was amazingly intact) came to rest on the other side.

Even more incredible is that the driver apparently ran away, fearing he'd be arrested! I think there was also a passenger who might've gotten a minor injury. LEOs on the scene figured they'd find two bodies in the car, but all they found was deployed air bags in the driver's compartment.

Power was, of course, out in a number of homes. Happened around 06:30 PST today.

Oh, what the idle rich will do....



Sounds like something I would do if I won the lottery

WIZZO
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 9:47:05 PM EDT
Both the Enzo and the F50 are pretty much full race cars. Most of the car is a carbon fiber tub, which explains the lack of bodies. So far there have been about 2 dozen of the original Enzo's to meet their maker. I remember one of the first was a 17 year old, his dad owned an RV sales chain in Texas, his son and his girlfriend tore off the front right wheel and all that nasty stuff that goes along with such things.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 9:32:52 AM EDT

Link Posted: 2/25/2006 2:33:04 PM EDT
There was a guy in italy I blieve that totaled one at 180+. The had to scrape him off the pavment. There was nothing left of the car except for the engine bay.
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 11:01:14 AM EDT
They only made 350 of them, one of which is in the Galleria Ferrari museum in Maranello.

What a waste of a fine automobile.
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 4:06:38 PM EDT
I disagree.

I'd rather see one shredded to pieces driven at speeds it was meant for, than rotting in some rich puke's garage, solely existing to further inflate a needing ego.

Shame it's trashed, but at least it went out the right way - broken and fiery as opposed to carbon build up or lack of maintenance.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 4:39:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chuckhammer:
They only made 350 of them, one of which is in the Galleria Ferrari museum in Maranello.

What a waste of a fine automobile.



Guns were made for shooting and cars were made for driving.
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 1:46:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/3/2006 1:47:10 PM EDT by nightstalker]
www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-ferrari3mar03,0,1423392.story?coll=la-home-headlines

This story is getting stranger and stranger. Blood found on driver's side airbag, guy in question had cut lip. Homeland Security showed up at traffic scene.....????? San Gabriel Valley Transit Authority has a Police Force...????? I smell some shady lawyers and other business going on..
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 6:47:51 PM EDT
The plot thickens...this just keeps getting weirder

news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/article349542.ece


Tall tales and fast cars add to mystery of LA Ferrari wipeout
By Andrew Gumbel in Los Angeles
Published: 06 March 2006

Sometimes it takes an Oscar-winning screenwriter to concoct a classic Los Angeles noir mystery, and sometimes such stories pop out of the clear blue, southern California sky.

It has been 10 days since Stefan Eriksson, the Swedish playboy businessman and co-founder of a now bankrupt high-tech company Gizmondo, walked away unscathed from a high-speed crash on the Pacific Coast Highway at Malibu. His million-dollar, limited-edition Ferrari was sliced in two by an electricity pole. The plot, meanwhile, hasn't stopped thickening.

First, Mr Eriksson told police he was a passenger, and that the driver - a German known to him only as Dietrich - had run off into a canyon, never to be seen again. That story seems to be breaking down fast, since blood likely to have come from Mr Eriksson's split lip, the only injury he sustained, was found on the driver's side of the car only.

Mr Eriksson's blood alcohol level, meanwhile, was found to be over the limit, as was his speed - estimated to have been more than 160mph at the point of impact. Was this, then, a routine drink-driving case, spiced up only by the unusually high speed of an unusually expensive car?

Not exactly. Next it appeared that the Ferrari had been racing a Mercedes SLR at the time of the crash. A second man interviewed by police claimed to have been a passenger in the Mercedes. But that story has also been discredited. "There was no Mercedes SLR," a police spokesman, Phil Brooks, told The Los Angeles Times. "Simply, there was a Ferrari with two people in it. One of these men was driving."

That "simply" may have been an over-optimistic assessment. Police also found an ammunition magazine for a Glock pistol near the crash site, which they are convinced is connected - although they do not know how.

Most mysterious of all are the two men who turned up minutes after the crash, claimed to be from "homeland security", talked their way past police lines by flashing badges, interviewed Mr Eriksson and left again. Nobody has a clue who they were. They are now being sought by police.

Mr Eriksson says he has an official governmental function in counter-terrorism - a remarkable twist for a man better known for loving parties and fast cars, whose company just collapsed under huge debt. In the first interview he gave to deputies at the scene, he said he was the deputy commissioner of the San Gabriel Valley Transit Authority's police anti-terrorism unit.

That story looks to be distinctly fishy, too. The San Gabriel Valley TA turns out to be a small private charity devoted to providing transport to disabled people in suburbs north-east of LA - nowhere near Malibu and nowhere near Mr Eriksson's mansion in Bel Air. It does not seem to have a police department, much less an anti-terrorism unit.

Someone from the agency told The Los Angeles Times, on condition of anonymity, that Mr Eriksson had been helping fit security cameras on its buses for the disabled. What this was supposed to have to do with thwarting deadly attacks on civilian targets is less than clear.

Mr Eriksson has refused to talk further with police, although he did agree last week to provide a blood sample.

His civil lawyer turns out to be the chairman of the San Gabriel Valley agency. It is not known if he has now hired a criminal lawyer as well. He has not been charged. The inquiry continues.

Sometimes it takes an Oscar-winning screenwriter to concoct a classic Los Angeles noir mystery, and sometimes such stories pop out of the clear blue, southern California sky.

It has been 10 days since Stefan Eriksson, the Swedish playboy businessman and co-founder of a now bankrupt high-tech company Gizmondo, walked away unscathed from a high-speed crash on the Pacific Coast Highway at Malibu. His million-dollar, limited-edition Ferrari was sliced in two by an electricity pole. The plot, meanwhile, hasn't stopped thickening.

First, Mr Eriksson told police he was a passenger, and that the driver - a German known to him only as Dietrich - had run off into a canyon, never to be seen again. That story seems to be breaking down fast, since blood likely to have come from Mr Eriksson's split lip, the only injury he sustained, was found on the driver's side of the car only.

Mr Eriksson's blood alcohol level, meanwhile, was found to be over the limit, as was his speed - estimated to have been more than 160mph at the point of impact. Was this, then, a routine drink-driving case, spiced up only by the unusually high speed of an unusually expensive car?

Not exactly. Next it appeared that the Ferrari had been racing a Mercedes SLR at the time of the crash. A second man interviewed by police claimed to have been a passenger in the Mercedes. But that story has also been discredited. "There was no Mercedes SLR," a police spokesman, Phil Brooks, told The Los Angeles Times. "Simply, there was a Ferrari with two people in it. One of these men was driving."

That "simply" may have been an over-optimistic assessment. Police also found an ammunition magazine for a Glock pistol near the crash site, which they are convinced is connected - although they do not know how.

Most mysterious of all are the two men who turned up minutes after the crash, claimed to be from "homeland security", talked their way past police lines by flashing badges, interviewed Mr Eriksson and left again. Nobody has a clue who they were. They are now being sought by police.

Mr Eriksson says he has an official governmental function in counter-terrorism - a remarkable twist for a man better known for loving parties and fast cars, whose company just collapsed under huge debt. In the first interview he gave to deputies at the scene, he said he was the deputy commissioner of the San Gabriel Valley Transit Authority's police anti-terrorism unit.

That story looks to be distinctly fishy, too. The San Gabriel Valley TA turns out to be a small private charity devoted to providing transport to disabled people in suburbs north-east of LA - nowhere near Malibu and nowhere near Mr Eriksson's mansion in Bel Air. It does not seem to have a police department, much less an anti-terrorism unit.

Someone from the agency told The Los Angeles Times, on condition of anonymity, that Mr Eriksson had been helping fit security cameras on its buses for the disabled. What this was supposed to have to do with thwarting deadly attacks on civilian targets is less than clear.

Mr Eriksson has refused to talk further with police, although he did agree last week to provide a blood sample.

His civil lawyer turns out to be the chairman of the San Gabriel Valley agency. It is not known if he has now hired a criminal lawyer as well. He has not been charged. The inquiry continues.
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