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Posted: 9/9/2010 3:06:56 PM EDT
I'm planning to sell one of my cars and the tires are worn out. So, I've been looking on Craigslist for a decent set of used tires figuring it will be easier to sell with good tires.

I found one set (Michelin) that is like new and not too far away for a good price. He said that they have been stored inside, in plastic bags for a few years, so I asked for the date code. He sent it and they are 10 years old!

Is that a problem if there are no visible cracks? I don't want to sell a car with unsafe tires.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 3:14:42 PM EDT
America's Tire wouldn't intall the 10 y/o tires I had - they had been stored inside and looked pristine.

Brian
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 3:16:17 PM EDT
as long as they dont show any sidewall cracking/degridation I would have no problem driving on them
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 3:22:04 PM EDT
6-7 years MAX, on any tire with any sort of tread. The rubber just gets too old and starts to crack.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 3:40:59 PM EDT
I still have the original tires on my WS6 with 26k miles on it. No issues with the tires. It's stored inside most of the time.

Take a good look at them. If there not cracked or damaged in anyway I'd say go for it.

Link Posted: 9/9/2010 3:43:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 3:45:42 PM EDT by sprayandpray]
Originally Posted By JimsZR2:
6-7 years MAX, on any tire with any sort of tread. The rubber just gets too old and starts to crack.


the cool thing about cracks is they are visable...... (shocking i know)
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 3:47:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 3:53:52 PM EDT by Another-Bill]
I realize that ignorance is bliss but.....you may just want to read this tid bit.

BTW it is illegal to sell out of date tires in Europe.

Are Your new tires really 6 year old ticking time bombs?


Are your new tires really 6-year old ticking time-bombs?

Check the tires on your car. How do they look? Plenty of tread, no bald spots, no wear and tear? If that’s the case, you’ve probably got a great set of tires with years of life left on them, right? Well, maybe not. Those tires could actually be ready to break apart at any moment.

I don’t like buying new tires. Right now, I’m shopping around for a good deal because the quote I got from my local tire store was close to $800. But I’m wary of "deals" on tires because they actually have a use-by date. Most people don’t know that. It’s not advertised and there's no law protecting us (more on that later). And worse still, the consequences of driving on old tires can be deadly. This is not just about getting the best tires for your money…it’s about getting SAFE tires.

In Europe and Asia, tire manufacturers inform customers about the dangers of old tires, and the very real dangers of driving on ‘new’ tires that are actually six years old, or even older. But here in Uncle Sam, we’re being kept in the dark. And that’s hardly surprising, because tires are a billion dollar business, and no company wants to destroy tires and see profits literally go up in smoke. They look new. They smell new. They are new, right?

Well, no. The rubber in the tires dries out over time. This can lead to cracking, greater stress on the tire’s infrastructure and “catastrophic failure.” When that happens, the tire can literally fall apart on you while you’re driving. The tread comes away from the tire quickly and violently. As you can imagine, this can be disastrous; even deadly.

So far, more than 100 deaths have been attributed to old tires, and there is currently a lawsuit against Bridgestone/Firestone for selling old tires as new. It’s alleged that these tires were responsible for a crash which left one man dead and a family without a father.

And yet despite all of this evidence, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has refused to impose a six-year shelf life on tires. All they have issued is a warning . Why? We could speculate, but money talks, and how many tire companies are ready to junk thousands of tires every month that could easily be sold as new?

A hidden camera report by ABC’s 20/20 , aired on May 9th, show revealed some shocking facts about so called ‘new tires’ currently on sale. Some tires were up to 12 years old, and were on sale at Sears, a reputable store. It makes you wander what stores without the big name and reputation will carry. You can watch the complete section below, this is 10 minutes of your time very well spent.

So, what can you do? First, check your tires.

Whether you’re shopping for new tires, riding on new tires, or have tires that are several years old, check the actual age of your tires asap. Knowing where to look and how to translate the code is simple enough, but it does vary depending on the age of your tires. The highlighted section below is the complete information I got from TireRack, the place where I buy my tires and a store that is very forthcoming about both tire age and longevity:

When it comes to determining the age of a tire, it is easy to identify when a tire was manufactured by reading its Tire Identification Number (often referred to as the tire’s serial number). Unlike vehicle identification numbers (VINs) and the serial numbers used on many other consumer goods (which identify one specific item), Tire Identification Numbers are really batch codes that identify the week and year the tire was produced.

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) requires that Tire Identification Numbers be a combination of the letters DOT, followed by ten, eleven or twelve letters and/or numbers that identify the manufacturing location, tire size and manufacturer's code, along with the week and year the tire was manufactured.

Tires Manufactured Since 2000
Since 2000, the week and year the tire was produced has been provided by the last four digits of the Tire Identification Number with the 2 digits being used to identify the week immediately preceding the 2 digits used to identify the year. Example of a tire manufactured since 2000 with the current Tire Identification Number format:

While the entire Tire Identification Number is required to be branded onto one sidewall of every tire, current regulations also require that DOT and the first digits of the Tire Identification Number must also be branded onto the opposite sidewall. Therefore, it is possible to see a Tire Identification Number that appears incomplete and requires looking at the tire’s other sidewall to find the entire Tire Identification Number:

The use of a partial Tire Identification Number on the one sidewall (shown above) reduces the risk of injury to the mold technician that would have to install the weekly date code on the top sidewall portion of a hot tire mold.

Tires Manufactured Before 2000
The Tire Identification Number for tires produced prior to 2000 was based on the assumption that tires would not be in service for ten years. While they were required to provided the same information as today’s tires, the week and year the tire was produced was contained in the last three digits. The 2 digits used to identify the week a tire was manufactured immediately preceded a single digit used to identify the year. Rxample of a tire manufactured before 2000 with the earlier Tire Identification Number format:

While the previous Tire Identification Number format identified that a tire was built in the 8th year of a decade, there was no universal identifier that confirmed which decade (tires produced in the 1990s may have a small triangle following the Tire Identification Number to identify the decade).
And finally, hold on to your sales receipt. Most tire manufacturer's warranties cover their tires for four years from the date of purchase or five years from the week the tires were manufactured. So if you purchase new tires that were manufactured exactly two years ago they will be covered for a total of six years (four years from the date of purchase) as long as you have your receipt. If you lose your receipt, your tires' warranty coverage will end five years from the week the tire was produced (resulting in the tire manufacturer's warranty coverage ending only three years from the date of purchase in this example).

For more information, you can also go to ABC here . ABC News

So, you have old tires. What next?

If you’re the OCD frugal shopper I am, you’ll have kept all of your receipts from the past few years for your major purchases (and I consider tires to be one of these). Most of us hang on to these receipts because tires come with a warranty, anywhere from 20k to 65k miles.

Contact the store, garage or website that sold you the tires and explain the situation. If your current tires have had plenty of use, you may still be entitled to at least a discount on a replacement set of tires. If you’re a good haggler, you may get a new set free of charge. And if you have just bought your tires, you should absolutely demand a replacement set that were manufactured recently.

I’ll be examining my new tires closely when the arrive from TireRack. I like a deal, but not at the expense of my safety. If the tires are older than 6 years (and I’m hoping they’re much newer than that) I’ll demand free replacements. You should too. Old tires being sold as new are not just an oversight. They’re a deadly deception. Drive safe folks.

UPDATE: My tires arrived today from TireRack, they shipped in just two days and each tire was manufactured within the last 5 months. I can heartily recommend TireRack not just as a way to save money on brand-name tires, but as a reliable source of brand new tires. They'll be getting my business again.

Link Posted: 9/9/2010 4:02:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 4:02:54 PM EDT by sprayandpray]
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
I realize that ignorance is bliss but.....you may just want to read this tid bit.

BTW it is illegal to sell out of date tires in Europe.

Are Your new tires really 6 year old ticking time bombs?



So far, more than 100 deaths have been attributed to old tires, ( since time began? in the last 6 months? in the last 100 years? how old were those tires? 6 years and 1 month? 10 years? 30 years? ) and there is currently a lawsuit against Bridgestone/Firestone for selling old tires as new. It’s alleged that these tires were responsible for a crash which left one man dead and a family without a father. ( there is currently a lawsuit about everything , nature of our legal system, how about some other info on this crash?)

And yet despite all of this evidence, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has refused to impose a six-year shelf life on tires. All they have issued is a warning . Why? We could speculate,(but we might find the truth is not what we are claiming) but money talks, and how many tire companies are ready to junk thousands of tires every month that could easily be sold as new?

A hidden camera report by ABC’s 20/20 , aired on May 9th, show revealed some shocking facts about so called ‘new tires’ currently on sale. Some tires were up to 12 years old, and were on sale at Sears, a reputable store. It makes you wander what stores without the big name and reputation will carry. You can watch the complete section below, this is 10 minutes of your time very well spent.( cool then we can watch their peices on guns , cause 20/20 NEVER agenda reports RIGHT?)





nice hit peice... not one shred of actual documentation on anything, accusations of corperate debauchery and evern a fatherless kid ......

10 for 10 on their part ,. i wonder if it was on guns if you would have seen through the bullshit?
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 4:04:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 4:05:49 PM EDT by Another-Bill]
Dude if you want to justify ridding on old tires knock you fucking lights out.
You defy logic and that is nothing to brag about.





Bill
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 4:06:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 4:09:14 PM EDT by sprayandpray]
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Dude if you want to justify ridding on old tires knock you fucking lights out.

Bill


huh?

I was merely pointing out the very obvious slant to your article and the less then thrilling history of it source.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 4:07:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:

You defy logic and that is nothing to brag about.

Bill


examples please?

(or is that just more baseless bullshit on your part?)
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 4:18:13 PM EDT


,. i wonder if it was on guns if you would have seen through the bullshit? Yes, a quote.

Link Posted: 9/9/2010 4:26:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 4:31:15 PM EDT by sprayandpray]
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:


,. i wonder if it was on guns if you would have seen through the bullshit? Yes, a quote.



How is that defying logic? Your post is inflammitory bullshit with nothing to back it up...... Logic would back it up with a little more then "there is a lawsuit" which was the only fact in the WHOLE FUCKING ARTICLE


So tell me sometrhing Mr tire expert? What does the rubber on the outside of the steel belts DO (since i am sure you know the greatest threat to tire rubber decompisition is UV and the rubber on the outside of the tire is the only part exposed to UV) ? Why is it there? What is its purpose?
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 4:39:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 4:52:01 PM EDT by eric496]

Thanks for the replies. It doesn't seem like it is worth th risk to save a few bucks. If i don't find another set for cheap, I'll just advertise it as "needs tires' and let the buyer deal with it.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 7:29:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Dude if you want to justify ridding on old tires knock you fucking lights out.
You defy logic and that is nothing to brag about.

Bill

Logic is based on reason and fact. You will not be able to provide satisfactory evidence which points to a cutoff date for a tire's shelf life.

The fact is that the most damaging thing to a tire is photodecomposition. Tires stored indoors in opaque bags would have a very long shelf life.

There are enough sunny weekend cruisers out there with original tires on them to fly in the face of any theory or "evidence" you provide.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 8:18:29 PM EDT
Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Dude if you want to justify ridding on old tires knock you fucking lights out.
You defy logic and that is nothing to brag about.





Bill

Logic is based on reason and fact. You will not be able to provide satisfactory evidence which points to a cutoff date for a tire's shelf life.

The fact is that the most damaging thing to a tire is photodecomposition. Tires stored indoors in opaque bags would have a very long shelf life.

There are enough sunny weekend cruisers out there with original tires on them to fly in the face of any theory or "evidence" you provide.


I recently had a ~12 y/o spare tire blow out - as it sat under the bed of my truck.......

Brian

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:41:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By brian4wd:
Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Dude if you want to justify ridding on old tires knock you fucking lights out.
You defy logic and that is nothing to brag about.

Bill

Logic is based on reason and fact. You will not be able to provide satisfactory evidence which points to a cutoff date for a tire's shelf life.

The fact is that the most damaging thing to a tire is photodecomposition. Tires stored indoors in opaque bags would have a very long shelf life.

There are enough sunny weekend cruisers out there with original tires on them to fly in the face of any theory or "evidence" you provide.


I recently had a ~12 y/o spare tire blow out - as it sat under the bed of my truck.......

Brian


and you know it was not due to some other form of damage or road debris how?
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 7:31:03 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sprayandpray:

Originally Posted By brian4wd:
Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Dude if you want to justify ridding on old tires knock you fucking lights out.
You defy logic and that is nothing to brag about.





Bill

Logic is based on reason and fact. You will not be able to provide satisfactory evidence which points to a cutoff date for a tire's shelf life.

The fact is that the most damaging thing to a tire is photodecomposition. Tires stored indoors in opaque bags would have a very long shelf life.

There are enough sunny weekend cruisers out there with original tires on them to fly in the face of any theory or "evidence" you provide.


I recently had a ~12 y/o spare tire blow out - as it sat under the bed of my truck.......

Brian


and you know it was not due to some other form of damage or road debris how?


While you are increasing your post count, otherwise you are not doing yourself any favors.

Was this, "Nite Crew Grand Inquisitor", your idea or was it anointed?

Give it a rest.





Bill
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 8:36:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Originally Posted By sprayandpray:

Originally Posted By brian4wd:
Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Dude if you want to justify ridding on old tires knock you fucking lights out.
You defy logic and that is nothing to brag about.





Bill

Logic is based on reason and fact. You will not be able to provide satisfactory evidence which points to a cutoff date for a tire's shelf life.

The fact is that the most damaging thing to a tire is photodecomposition. Tires stored indoors in opaque bags would have a very long shelf life.

There are enough sunny weekend cruisers out there with original tires on them to fly in the face of any theory or "evidence" you provide.


I recently had a ~12 y/o spare tire blow out - as it sat under the bed of my truck.......

Brian


and you know it was not due to some other form of damage or road debris how?


While you are increasing your post count, otherwise you are not doing yourself any favors.

Was this, "Nite Crew Grand Inquisitor", your idea or was it anointed?

Give it a rest.

Bill


Yes .... we all need to give the truth a rest per bill .....

Did you find any facts ?

(annointed , thanks for playing)
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 8:45:55 AM EDT
I wouldn't touch 10 year old tires.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 11:47:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By eric496:

Thanks for the replies. It doesn't seem like it is worth th risk to save a few bucks. If i don't find another set for cheap, I'll just advertise it as "needs tires' and let the buyer deal with it.

Quiet OP. People are fighting.

Garaged or not, take some 10 year-old tires out for a spin in the rain. I bought a 10 year old Z28 with 6,000 original miles that had been garaged except when he put the 6,000 on it. The tires looked pristine but the rubber was hard as a rock! Scary on wet pavement. I replaced them first thing.

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 1:16:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sprayandpray:

Originally Posted By brian4wd:
Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

Originally Posted By Another-Bill:
Dude if you want to justify ridding on old tires knock you fucking lights out.
You defy logic and that is nothing to brag about.

Bill

Logic is based on reason and fact. You will not be able to provide satisfactory evidence which points to a cutoff date for a tire's shelf life.

The fact is that the most damaging thing to a tire is photodecomposition. Tires stored indoors in opaque bags would have a very long shelf life.

There are enough sunny weekend cruisers out there with original tires on them to fly in the face of any theory or "evidence" you provide.


I recently had a ~12 y/o spare tire blow out - as it sat under the bed of my truck.......

Brian


and you know it was not due to some other form of damage or road debris how?

The way some of the spares are mounted in trucks can leave a little to be desired too. I've seen them with valleys worn into them from the storage method.

Let's not forget that virtually no one checks the air pressure in their spare tire. When it's time to use it, the tire has an unsafe air pressure. I've seen many spares come in with damage from being run at too low of an air pressure.

This is a valid anecdotal example of what can happen with an old tire. That doesn't make it a rule though.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:22:37 PM EDT
I'll bet Fatty World would do it.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 5:24:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/10/2010 5:25:03 PM EDT by Firebird69]
dl
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 8:23:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Firebird69:
I'll bet Fatty World would do it.

There are a lot of places which refuse to mount tires over XX age now. Liability reasons of course. I think the oldest new tire I ever mounted was made when I was in 7th grade. If I wasn't out of my 7th year of college I was darn close to it.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 5:15:51 AM EDT
In '04 I bought my '95 Mustang GT with the original tires on it. Drove it home from VA to SC not even looking at the tires first. About shit my pants when I got home and took a closer look. Sidewalls were split open from dryrot and hard as a rock. Needless to say, tires were purchased asap.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 7:26:46 PM EDT
10 year old tires are a no go. Its not exactly something I would like to be gambling with.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 9:17:55 PM EDT
I wouldn't do it. You might be fine, and if your willing to risk it, go right ahead. It's not some thing I would be willing to do though. I spend to much time on the freeway doing 70-80 mph to feel comfortable doing that.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 3:34:33 PM EDT
When my folks gave us their VW Vanagon it had new tires on it that they had installed at least six or seven years before; the van sat for the most part un-used in a garage all that time. I picked it up and drove it 1,500. miles home without incident, however within two months I had to replace all four due to de lamination. They were Hankook tires if that really makes any difference.
Bottom line: They looked good, rode well, and went another 2K, but still cracked/checked, bulged, bubbled, and blew out once they stated to get some real use after sitting all those years.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 8:20:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

Originally Posted By Firebird69:
I'll bet Fatty World would do it.

There are a lot of places which refuse to mount tires over XX age now. Liability reasons of course. I think the oldest new tire I ever mounted was made when I was in 7th grade. If I wasn't out of my 7th year of college I was darn close to it.

FWIW I have an 11 year old set of BF Goodrich tires on my FB that are rolling just fine. Of course they only have 1000 miles on them and have been on the car in the garage since then.
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