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Posted: 3/10/2006 9:34:30 AM EDT
James Yeager has posted the cover of the April issue
at Glock Talk.

When will it be on the newsstand? It will be on my reading list.

www.glocktalk.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=511856
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 11:28:33 AM EDT
Got mine last night.
Can't wait to read it!
Link Posted: 3/10/2006 11:35:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2006 11:42:31 PM EDT by rhino_]
Mine arrived Friday afternoon!

Louis Awerbuck's column was great as always, and with a slightly different topic. I know a lot of people think they have the right attitude when carrying, but many I know tend to be a little too belligerent!

Claire Wolfe hit yet another home run. The only disagreement I have with her this time is her conclusion of "the poor subsidizing the rich" based on her assertion that poor communities can't afford grant writers, so the more affluent communities get all the money. I'm not sure that assertion is true, and the conclusion isn't as accurate as something like "those who have access to better grant writers get a better chance to reap the benefits of money stolen from EVERY tax payer, which includes themselves."

The article about driving to get away from an ambush was excellent and got me thinking in a smaller scale about more mundane problems some of us might face like car jackings. The situational awareness and some experience with operating one's own vehicle in reverse are entirely applicable!

The article about the people along the USA-Mexico border trying to protect themselves, their property, and our country was also excellent and not the perspective we'd get from other media (even FOXNews). I believed things were bad, but I had not idea they were that bad. It was cool seeing the Republican Delegate willing to actually do something about the problem and be public about it. It wasn't so cool learning that the higher profile "Minutemen" aren't allowed (by their own rules) to carry anything bigger than sidearms. While I understand their desire to keep a lower profile, if things are that bad, it's foolhardy to be traipsing around those areas without your rifle or at least a shotgun.

PeteG's article was also an excellent contribution to the pages of SWAT. I've thought most of the same things he mentioned, but when I've dared put them into text elsewhere, it was not well received. I suppose it's one of those Emperor/clothing/nekkid deals that some people just don't want to acknowledge. I've had some minor disagreements with PeteG in the past, but he's right on the money this time.
Link Posted: 3/11/2006 12:13:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/11/2006 12:14:15 AM EDT by CAAAwarfighter]
Excellent issue! I was suprised to see the "quiet border Militiamen turning over illegals were armed with AR's, not just pistols.(pg54) I guess they have different policy than the Minutemen. Smart... why be outgunned?
Link Posted: 3/11/2006 8:44:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rhino_:
...PeteG's article was also an excellent contribution to the pages of SWAT. I've thought most of the same things he mentioned, but when I've dared put them into text elsewhere, it was not well received. I suppose it's one of those Emperor/clothing/nekkid deals that some people just don't want to acknowledge. ...he's right on the money this time.



I think that article was the most relavant feature to my life & training in this months issue. Thanks for printing it.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 3:07:03 AM EDT
Yeah, when someone tells me they won't attend a class with an instructor unless he's a combination delta force/navy seal/swat cop/ernest hemingway who has been in a hundred of battles and gun fights, the implication is that someone who hasn't "been there and done that" can't possibly have anything to offer them.

That when I like to use the basketball analogy. Looks at the NBA and NCAA and the coaches. A LOT of those coaches couldn't hit a layup to save their lives, yet they're awesome coaches, teachers, recruiters, and motivators, so their teams win.

"Practical experience" is certainly valuable in the overall context, but I don't believe it should be a pre-requisite for choosing an instructor. I think communication skills, diagnostic ability, and other teaching traits are more important. I'd rather try to learn from someone who has never killed anyone or assaulted a beach head, but who is a good teacher than someone who makes Sergeant York and Audie Murphy look like pansies, but can't teach their way out of wet paper sack.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 10:21:55 AM EDT
"Practical experience" is certainly valuable in the overall context, but I don't believe it should be a pre-requisite for choosing an instructor. I think communication skills, diagnostic ability, and other teaching traits are more important. I'd rather try to learn from someone who has never killed anyone or assaulted a beach head, but who is a good teacher than someone who makes Sergeant York and Audie Murphy look like pansies, but can't teach their way out of wet paper sack.

Nobody can well argue that practical experience is not important (and I don't mean to imply that is what "Rhino" is saying). The real inquiry is, what experience is "practical"?

What we need to do, it seems to me, is be a lot more clear about what it is that we deem to be "practical experience." There is an assumption that "practical experience" means police or military experience, preferably experience killing people. Instead of challenging that underlying assumption, people who are in a position to know are trying to captialze upon it, even though it is more often than not - or even usually - incorrect.

My father had a lot of experience blowing up bridges and railroads in Greece and Bulgaria in WW-II. In the process, he doubtless killed dozens of people, if not hundreds. And he was genuinely a tough individual. Would that make him a good pistolcraft instructor? The answer is "no." He did not like hand guns, never carried a hand gun unless under orders to do so, never used one outside mandatory training, and was vocally opposed to my buying my first hand gun.

Were he alive today, would it be honest and legitimate to have him run a pistol course, and tout him as "former OSS operative" and "trained directly with Col. Applegate"? It would be factually accurate, but it would not be the truth. Because I know those experieces would not be particularly relevant, "selling" them would be a form of dishonesy.

Everyone keeps reciting the importance of "using the right tool for the job." When it comes to selecting a trainer, we must first identify the job, and only then look for experience that makes a particular trainer the right tool. Any other approach seems to me to put the cart before the horse.

PeteG
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 1:29:07 PM EDT
Well said.

I hope to see more articles from you in the future!

By the way ... do we "know" the people in the photos?

Link Posted: 3/15/2006 10:38:31 AM EDT
I hope to see more articles from you in the future!

By the way ... do we "know" the people in the photos?


Thank you very much for your kind words.

I hope to write a follow-up article, approaching the problem from the positive side. I want to interview some those I call the "gray-heads," meaning trainers who have been around for 20 years or more, and get thier opinions on what IS a good indicator of a competent trainer. I already have a couple of interviews "in the can." It remains to be seen if anyone will be interested in publishing it.

The people in "choke" photo are Randy Cain and Ben Salas. That photo was taken at an excellent course those two conducted in October, 2004, called "CQB Carbine." I asked Ben to demonstrate how to use one of the popular "single point" slings to choke its owner, and they were kind enough to oblige.

The people in the "driveway assault" photo are my wife, Betty, and Phil Mangone, who frequently works as a range officer in courses here in Pittsburgh. (It was 13 degrees out when that photo was taken. They both froze in those light jackets.)
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 11:35:51 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 11:46:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/17/2006 11:55:56 AM EDT
Denny:

I am working on it now.

Peter
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:50:28 AM EDT
Excellent issue, particularly Vehicle Ambush and Border Wars
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 6:54:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Storm_Trooper:
Excellent issue, particularly Vehicle Ambush and Border Wars



I really enjoyed both of those articles imensly, a ton of good info in both and of course all the others but thoose 2 were my favorite
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:36:27 AM EDT
The ambush driving article was good.

It is harder than heck to drive a Diesel powered VW Jetta backwards FAST.

It's harder yet to find a place where LEO's don't chase you off the parking lot!
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 3:23:59 PM EDT
SWAT Magazine is the magazine that I seem to purchase most frequently. Great articles about all of the latest gear and tactics. What else do you need?
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:04:16 PM EDT
Saw the Border Wars Article referenced here:

America Under Attack

See you're inspiring people!
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 6:50:48 PM EDT
does any one know how to get in touch with border guardian groups that may need volunteers
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