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Posted: 2/12/2006 2:57:23 PM EDT
Ok, yeah, I'm a sap. Still, when you wear your heart on your sleeve for a woman and she steps on it, what the hell else are you supposed to do?

So, the last couple days have been spent reloading, cooking, and running. Still, thought I'd put all of the bad thoughts and feelings into something.


How'd I do?





Canon IXUS S500, B/W mode, dunno the exposure (damn compact digitals), cropped and lightened slightly w/ photochop
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 8:55:07 PM EDT
Pretty good. I think it would benefit from higher contrast.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 9:11:11 PM EDT
What sort of lighting did you use? Is that a window or something to the right? High ISO?
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 1:44:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By aaronstaple:
What sort of lighting did you use? Is that a window or something to the right? High ISO?



Camera's set at ISO 400, and the lighting is just from the fluorescent bulb from the kitchen to the right.

I always wondered about the ISO settings. I guess it mimics the grain size of the film...?
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 1:49:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/13/2006 1:53:04 AM EDT by 4xys2xxs]
I'm not a camera person...

so take this for what its worth.

But I like it.

eta: I'm a girl, so what I notice is that the lamp is crooked.
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 1:53:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/13/2006 1:54:50 AM EDT by aaronstaple]

Originally Posted By Mall-Ninja:
I always wondered about the ISO settings. I guess it mimics the grain size of the film...?



ISO is film speed, or the digital equivilent. Higher ISO is more sensitive to light (and thus allows shorter exposures) but has more visible grains or noise. ISO 200 is about the highest I can do on my compact without visible grains, but if I have adequate lighting, I stick with 50 or whatever the lowest is. However, as in your pic, the grains add a lot of character to some shots...

ETA: Suddenly I'm attracted to 4xys2xxs.
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 1:59:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By aaronstaple:

Originally Posted By Mall-Ninja:
I always wondered about the ISO settings. I guess it mimics the grain size of the film...?



ISO is film speed, or the digital equivilent. Higher ISO is more sensitive to light (and thus allows shorter exposures) but has more visible grains or noise. ISO 200 is about the highest I can do on my compact without visible grains, but if I have adequate lighting, I stick with 50 or whatever the lowest is. However, as in your pic, the grains add a lot of character to some shots...

ETA: Suddenly I'm attracted to 4xys2xxs.



I know about ISO numbers from my days as a photog (I worked with film exclusively), I just didn't know why a digital camera would have ISO, since CCDs were supposed to be the next whiz-bang thing, and I figured they'd be more sensitive than film. I think the grain came into being since I was using B/W mode and perhaps low light. It's never shown grain for sunlight shots.
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 2:04:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 4xys2xxs:
eta: I'm a girl, so what I notice is that the lamp is crooked.



yeah, well, that lamp's roughly 20 years old.... I remember Dad setting it up in the living room when I was a kid, and how it was bright and shiny. Left it for Grandma when we left the states. Picked it up again when I came back to L.A. and got her a new lamp.
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 2:22:25 AM EDT
I'ts a nice pic.

I like the mood it sets.

I just don't get the photo-ese, and was still trying to be all cool, and analytical.

Sorry if I offended Ninja.

Link Posted: 2/13/2006 6:07:54 AM EDT
The grain you see is a result of using ISO 400 and the picture being shot in low light. If the picture was shot outdoors, the grain would be less visible. The sensors on compact cameras are tiny and their size introduces more noise than the film ISO 400 equivalent. The DSLRs have larger sensors and have better grain/noise than some film counterparts. The ISO on the digital cameras mimic the light sensitivity of the film speeds. The sensor data is amplified when the ISO is increased, Thereby introducing noise into the electirc signals resulting in the grain you see in the picture.
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