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Posted: 3/20/2006 10:02:27 AM EDT
Hello all. I've been reading your posts for awhile and very amazed at the wealth and quality of information I've seen. First of all, I'm a dancer, not an athlete, but I believe dancing is similar to sports in many ways: they both require skills, coordination and creativity (spontaneity). So I hope you don't mind that I post this topic here.

I've suffered a tremendous set back for the past month or so and I just can't figure out how to get back on track. What kind of a set back? Well, I just simply can't dance well anymore. I keep making rookie-like mistakes, botching up moves and techniques that I've long mastered, my creativity and spontaneity are gone and I'm losing my sense of rhytm and beat. What upsets me the most (about myself) is that I've been making mistakes that I have always consciously and diligently avoid throughout my dancing "life".

I've suffered setbacks before, but they've never been this severe or been going on so long like this. I'm just about ready to kick myself. I've worked so hard at my dancing and.....puff.....suddenly gone are all my skills? I'm far from being a dance master, but I've never performed this horrible (not even when I was a rookie) before.

Any suggestion would be appreciated. I work a lot also, so please pardon me if I don't reply soon enough.

Thanks!
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:47:22 PM EDT
Try a different pole.......
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 3:13:23 PM EDT
Take some lessons from Napoleon Dynamite.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 9:34:54 PM EDT
Huh?
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 8:46:02 AM EDT
It sounds like you're putting too much pressure on yourself, where before things came naturally, now you're maybe over-thinking/analyzing everything. If you're working a lot like you mentioned, that might also be affecting things like your concentration, or just making you too tired to perform well.

Try to go into your next session with a positive attitude, believing in yourself and believing that you'll perform well, and don't allow yourself to put so much pressure on yourself that it causes you to make mistakes. Just let it flow.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:10:28 PM EDT
Every one will have an off day, and some times that can turn into a bit of a rut.

If possible, I would try to take a week or two off. You will be chomping at the bit to get back into it when the time off is up, and you will feel a lot better about it.

When that does not work, I like to jack more often. It is a great stress reliever, and helps to get my mind off of other things. Seriously.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 8:40:37 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 10:30:19 AM EDT
Lester_Burnham, Killingmachine 123 and texastactical: Thank you all for the replies.
Excellent suggestions and I will try my best to follow them, but it might not be as easy as it seems. For example, I put a high pressure on myself because I care very much about making the ladies look good on the dance floor. When my leads are falling apart, I feel very awful. There are times lately when I can't even look at my dancing partners in the face. And yes, working a lot sure kicks my butt and dancing tired often equals to disaster, but with my odd schedule, I have no choice but to go dancing after my 12 hours shifts.

I agree about taking some times off. I have not been dancing for a week now and I am starting to have a fresh perspective (reflections) about my dancing. Before that, I was just upset at myself and my mind was just muddled. Should I completely lay off the dancing when I take some times off, or should I keep rehearsing my moves so I don't become rusty when I start dancing again? Should I just have a "fresh jump start", almost like starting over again from the scratch? There is no question that I will have to go back to the basics, but I am affraid that by doing so I would bore the ladies on the dance floor. At the same time, I am sure that boring them is better than making them look bad by botching up moves and having poor rhytm, timing, and spontaneity. hank
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 10:51:26 AM EDT
You're a dude? Well don't that beat all........
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 11:58:17 AM EDT
When I take time off from lifting, I will usually come back stringer than before having done no training for a couple of weeks. If you are working that much, and spending a lot of time dancing that could take a lot out of you.

You might want to try and read some of the nuitrition articles at www.wannabebig.com
They will help you get the most out of your diet, and help you recover in a more timly fashion.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 9:45:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By killingmachine123:
Every one will have an off day, and some times that can turn into a bit of a rut.

If possible, I would try to take a week or two off. You will be chomping at the bit to get back into it when the time off is up, and you will feel a lot better about it.

When that does not work, I like to jack more often. It is a great stress reliever, and helps to get my mind off of other things. Seriously.



Dude, are you saying what I think you're saying or does jack have a different alternate meaning?
It's cool if that's what works for you, but personally, I prefer dipping mine.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 3:54:25 PM EDT
Cool, Killimgmachine123! Thanks for the nutritional link. I went dancing last night after one week off. I was still having an off night with techniques and moves, my creativity was...well...nothing to write home about, but my spontaneity did seem to improve.

I know you guys are just having fun with me, but just want to make it clear, I'm not a stripper or a "Chip and Dale" (or whatever they call it) dancer. I do the Lindy Hop, also known by its generic term "swing". It comprised primarily of 8-counts and 6-counts (and some 4 counts) variations along with moves adopted from other dances. Originated in Harlem, NY.

Speaking of "Chip and Dale" dancers...hmmmm....maybe I should try doing that. Do those guys make lots of money? I work 72 hours weeks and made barely over 50K last year, and that's with bonuses.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 5:27:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 3:21:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lindy_Hoppin_Gun_Nut:
Cool, Killimgmachine123! Thanks for the nutritional link. I went dancing last night after one week off. I was still having an off night with techniques and moves, my creativity was...well...nothing to write home about, but my spontaneity did seem to improve.

I know you guys are just having fun with me, but just want to make it clear, I'm not a stripper or a "Chip and Dale" (or whatever they call it) dancer. I do the Lindy Hop, also known by its generic term "swing". It comprised primarily of 8-counts and 6-counts (and some 4 counts) variations along with moves adopted from other dances. Originated in Harlem, NY.

Speaking of "Chip and Dale" dancers...hmmmm....maybe I should try doing that. Do those guys make lots of money? I work 72 hours weeks and made barely over 50K last year, and that's with bonuses.



Hopefully it will come together for you. Personally, I was struggling with my performance in the gym when I was working close to 70 hours/week durring my student teaching. I don't know that I could go out dancing after some of those long days.

If you have a six pack, and you are a male stripper you would make good money. I know of one guy who easily put himself through college while doing this. The fringe benefits are great too from what I hear.

Again, good luck.
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