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Posted: 12/31/2005 9:13:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/15/2006 6:38:24 AM EDT by Justa_TXguy]
POST RACE REPORT - I did it :) www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=113&t=427801&page=1

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Chevron Texaco Houston Marathon

My first race ever. I'm signed up, got my number...no backing out now.

I know I can do the distance, but I'm still nervous. I run on the treadmill because I have bad knees, and it cushions for me. Running on th street hurts more, so I have to make sure to dope up with Advil before I leave that morning.

Also, I have to be there early in the morning. I usually never run before noon.

Oh, and I have a bad habit of running too fast when I'm not on the treadmill, and it's hard for me to slow it down. I'm worried I'd end up going 8 minute miles and run out of gas when I should be more like 10 or 11 minute miles, letting the fat women in spandex pass me.

Oh, they told me that they take your picture when (if) you cross the finish line. I have to remember to try to look cool and relaxed when I cross the line. I don't want my first race pic to have me looking like I'm about to code as I stumble across the finish line.

Should I be this nervous?

Link Posted: 12/31/2005 9:44:57 AM EDT
Nervous is fine. Don't take Advil or any other pain killer before the race. If you overdo it and hurt yourself, pain killers may mask the symptoms giving you time to make the injury worse. Have a couple when you are finished.

If you are worried about starting too fast, get towards the rear of the crowd. You will be weaving through bodies for the first half-mile or more and won't be able to turn and burn. Please please please don't forget to have fun. It's supposed to be fun. Good luck.
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 12:07:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/31/2005 12:09:17 PM EDT by kato4moto]
First race EVER? Wow. That's kind of like entering Daytona or Indy after you get your driver's license.

Do NOT try to race it. Like H46Driver said, you may want to consider starting in the back of what's going to be a huge pack. You're probably going to have to walk (fast but still a walk) for at least a half mile. Don't worry.

For us non-gifted athletes, starting out slow and finishing (relatively) fast makes for a much more enjoyable experience, no matter what the distance. This is called a negative split--the first half of the race should be slower than the last half. This allows your body time to warm up fully and get into the swing of things.

You may want to consider doing the walk/run thing. Run a certain time (or distance) then walk a little, then get back to running. I did this one year when I wasn't sufficiently trained--probably only doing 25-30 miles a week, no long runs--and still went under four hours. How I did it was run to the aid station, walk through the aid station (allowed me to drink more as well) and keep walking for a total of five minutes. One coach told me the fastest most people will be able to go doing this is 3:30 BTW.

As for Advil and other stuff, I can't comment. Never have used anything before a race except water/sports drinks and a banana or Power Bar.

Good luck! Have fun. There's a lot of chatting in the back of the pack so find someone with similar goals and slide in alongside them. I notice the chatter drops off considerably after mile 20 though. Folks are simply trying to focus on getting through that last 10K.

ETA: Ooooops! Just read you're doing the 5K. Disregard the first sentence. Still, go out slower than you want to finish.
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 2:36:39 PM EDT
Yes, I am only running the 5K.

I will take the Advil for inflammation more than for pain. I have chronic knee problems and if I don't take any, my knees will swell.

I just got back from the gym. I ran 5K in 34 minutes. I set it to keep changing the incline and running on 6% kicked my ass. Made the 2% seem easy.

My plan - go to sleep early the night before and get up around 4am. I need some time to wake up and stretch since I never run early. I'm not sure if I'll eat first. If I do, it will just be some oatmeal or a bagel, nothing major.

Quite a few friends of mine are running too, but they're all doing the half or the full marathon. I'm the only noob running the 5K.

They say not to do anything new for the race, so I'm putting off buying new running shoes (much needed) until afterwards. I know exactly what I'll be wearing, as well.

It's possible I'm overthinking a 30 minute race.


Originally Posted By H46Driver:
Please please please don't forget to have fun. It's supposed to be fun. Good luck.



Thanks man, I'll try.
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 2:46:05 PM EDT
Don't sweat it. I ran my first 5K a couple of years ago. I ran with the objective of finishing strong and KILAH (Keep It Light And Happy)

Get up early and make sure you're at the start line with plenty of time to spare. The bathroom lines will be long and you will almost certainly have to make a pit stop before the race. Drink plenty of water the day before as well as that same morning. Eat light is right on. I always eat a table/tea spoonful of pure honey a few minutes before I workout or race--keeps the blood glucose from spiking and crashing.

Enjoy the race. Stay safe. Stay positive. Have fun. Don't try to win it, just run to finish well (happy, uninjured, etc.)

You should at least run a couple of miles on a similar course to make sure you can take it. You can alter your running style to more of a shuffle rather than the pounding on the joints. Just experiment a little and I'll say it again--have fun.
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 2:58:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:


They say not to do anything new for the race, so I'm putting off buying new running shoes (much needed) until afterwards. I know exactly what I'll be wearing, as well.

It's possible I'm overthinking a 30 minute race.


Originally Posted By H46Driver:
Please please please don't forget to have fun. It's supposed to be fun. Good luck.



Thanks man, I'll try.



Your friends are right - don't do anything new before the race. Maybe get up and go for an early run next weekend, just to see how your body reacts. You don't need a lot of fuel for a 5K, but I hate PTing on an empty stomach. Even half a bagel with some topping would be better than nothing.

You're gonna have a blast. Enjoy the scenery - major attraction to this type of activity.

Check back in after the race and let us know how it went.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 5:12:08 PM EDT
If your kness are bothering you and you now its your shoes. You have two weeks to get a pair and have them broken in. What kinda of shoes do you run it. If you have bad knee becuase of impact you should get a good pair of cushioned shoes. With bad knees you should never let a pair of shoes get over 300 miles on them if you dont know when you reached 300 miles start a log book. Record the date, distance and time of your run. Eventually you begin to have alot of data and your log book will be one of you greatest training tools.

Shoot for low mileage easy runs for 5 days before the race.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 5:16:28 PM EDT
I'll come down and yell for you if you'll make me a deal on that DE .50 AE you have for sale.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 4:31:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Sixgun357:
If your kness are bothering you and you now its your shoes. You have two weeks to get a pair and have them broken in. What kinda of shoes do you run it. If you have bad knee becuase of impact you should get a good pair of cushioned shoes. With bad knees you should never let a pair of shoes get over 300 miles on them if you dont know when you reached 300 miles start a log book. Record the date, distance and time of your run. Eventually you begin to have alot of data and your log book will be one of you greatest training tools.

Shoot for low mileage easy runs for 5 days before the race.



I've had bad knees for years, because of basketball.
I already use cushion shoes - Brooks Epiphany. When I went for a gait analysis, the guy who was looking at my old Reebok running shooes was surprised that they only had about 50 miles on them. He said they looked more like 500 than 50, and we attribute it to me being a big guy and just plain wearing them out quicker.


Originally Posted By THR-Thumper:
I'll come down and yell for you if you'll make me a deal on that DE .50 AE you have for sale.



$949 on race day only. Actually, that one's back in the aafe now. I came to my senses.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 10:14:28 AM EDT
Ooooh, if you're a big guy (over 180 pounds), beware of "cushioned" shoes. They're generally designed for the biomechanically efficient and lighter weight runners. You should be looking for "stable" or "motion control" shoes. The Brooks Beast is a good example of the motion control type; their Addiction is also a good shoe. Stability and motion control shoes will last longer for bigger runners who tend to pound the pavement.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 5:16:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By kato4moto:
Ooooh, if you're a big guy (over 180 pounds), beware of "cushioned" shoes. They're generally designed for the biomechanically efficient and lighter weight runners. You should be looking for "stable" or "motion control" shoes. The Brooks Beast is a good example of the motion control type; their Addiction is also a good shoe. Stability and motion control shoes will last longer for bigger runners who tend to pound the pavement.



I'm 250. Thanks for the tip; I had no idea.

I have a neutral gait, so i don't need any pronator shoes or anything, but I'll check out the motion control stuff next time I'm at the running store.

Link Posted: 1/14/2006 4:19:56 PM EDT
So it's tommorow (Sunday) morning - I'm getting up at like 4am.

If I don't die I'll post a race report tomorrow.

Link Posted: 1/14/2006 5:18:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Justa_TXguy:

Originally Posted By kato4moto:
Ooooh, if you're a big guy (over 180 pounds), beware of "cushioned" shoes. They're generally designed for the biomechanically efficient and lighter weight runners. You should be looking for "stable" or "motion control" shoes. The Brooks Beast is a good example of the motion control type; their Addiction is also a good shoe. Stability and motion control shoes will last longer for bigger runners who tend to pound the pavement.



I'm 250. Thanks for the tip; I had no idea.

I have a neutral gait, so i don't need any pronator shoes or anything, but I'll check out the motion control stuff next time I'm at the running store.




If you have a neutral gait don't get motion control shoes. I ran in them for years before I had a gait analysis done (film) by a trained pro. My gait is also neutral. Kills me to think about all of the miles that I ran in over-heavy clunky shoes. I'm not your size, but I am not a little guy either at 188 (and 205 a year ago).
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:25:49 PM EDT
I reccomend a good pair of cushioned shoes for larger runners to save the stress on the joints if you have a nutraul gate. If you are an over pronator or under you might want to consider seeing a podiatrist and getting a set of orthotics made for your feet. Thats what I do and I am running in a pair of Brooks radius now. I liked My mizuno Wave Rider 7's. The Brooks have more cushion in them than the Mizunos amd not as responsive than the MIzunos. The Brooks Glycerin is a really cushioned shoe.
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