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Posted: 12/20/2005 9:07:46 AM EDT

I've improved my running time significantly in the past few months, but I still have a ways to go.

Other than running more and eating better (of course), what can I do the day or two prior to a run to cut down on my overall time? I ran this morning and actually added :09 to my 2 mile time from two weeks ago, which is not good. I drank lots of water last night and this morning, had chicken & pasta for dinner, stretched out plenty, and took a Thermodrene pill about an hour before running. That all gave me more confidence prior to pounding the asphalt, but it didn't seem to give me addtional energy on the run itself.

Any advice would be appreciated.
Link Posted: 12/20/2005 11:21:17 AM EDT
Two things will improve your run time:
1)circuit drills
2)run further.

I didn't do that much circuit training when I was a runner, but I did find that running longer distances helped me to take MINUTES, not seconds, off my 2 and 3 mile times.
Link Posted: 12/22/2005 4:26:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/22/2005 4:45:52 PM EDT by Sixgun357]
Mileage....Increase weekly and daily Mileage. Hill work, Sprints and Tempo runs. No way around it. Being a good runner is not something that is done over night or by eating good one night before a race. Or Having a Gu before running one day.

Running is about getting out on a regular basis from 3 to 6 days a week. Some days you go out just to do mileage with no time goal, other days you do speed or hills. But most days should be about getting the miles in. You need a good base to build from. Then you start building from there. You can not go out everyday and expect to be faster.

More to come later.
Link Posted: 12/23/2005 3:05:16 PM EDT
Describe your weekly workouts, both distance and intensity. Bottom line is that first you have to have a decent aerobic base. Then you have to run fast (intervals) to get fast. 1/4 mile intervals for a 2 mile goal. It's tough to advise you without more insight into your fitness level, weight, and current routine.
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 3:54:06 PM EDT
Stay hydrated during the week and don't overdo the water day prior and day of your event.
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 7:32:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
Describe your weekly workouts, both distance and intensity. Bottom line is that first you have to have a decent aerobic base.



Currently running two miles at least three times a week, time ranges from 15:57 to 17:09 in the past two weeks. Weight is approx. 187lbs, down from 193lbs six weeks ago. I run at a constant pace, and occasionally have to walk a portion of the run, mostly due to psychological reasons as opposed to physical. If I can't keep my mind off of my breathing, then I start to hyperventilate within the first mile.


I was thinking I might just do a five mile run/walk on Friday, and try to cut down my overall time from there. Since I haven't done that in a long time, it will probably take me 50 minutes or more to complete that distance. Maybe I can cut it down to under 40 minutes eventually.

Link Posted: 12/29/2005 4:30:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/29/2005 9:03:05 AM EDT by H46Driver]

Originally Posted By AvengeR15:

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
Describe your weekly workouts, both distance and intensity. Bottom line is that first you have to have a decent aerobic base.



Currently running two miles at least three times a week, time ranges from 15:57 to 17:09 in the past two weeks. Weight is approx. 187lbs, down from 193lbs six weeks ago. I run at a constant pace, and occasionally have to walk a portion of the run, mostly due to psychological reasons as opposed to physical. If I can't keep my mind off of my breathing, then I start to hyperventilate within the first mile.





OK - good info. You have two things that you need to train. Your body and your mind.

Mentally, you have to realize that 2 miles (and really even 5) is not all that far. Not trying to knock you down - it is just a hurdle that you need to get through by actually doing it. Before doing any kind of speed/interval training, gradually increase your runs to 3 miles and then 30 minutes three times per/week. Once you get to 30 minutes 3/week, pick one run/week and add 1/2 mile/week to it until you get to a long run of 5 miles.

What is important here is building your aerobic system - the foundation of your fitness. Don't kill yourself, but run at a comfortable pace. A good guide for an aerobic training pace is one where you could hold a conversation. If this feels absurdly slow - too bad. Be patient. Your speed will increase eventually.

When you get to a 4 mile long run you can start to add in some speedwork once/week. Do your speedwork on the run with the most days off preceeding it (if you run M-W-F do your speedwork on Monday). Warm up for 5-10 minutes and then alternate 3-4 minutes at your current 2 mile run pace (8 minute miles) with 2-3 minutes of slow jogging. Start with one or two "speed jumps" and add 1/week. After your speed intervals, jog comfortably for the remainder of your 30 minute run time.

Since you can put two 8 minute miles together now, you have enough fitness to follow this plan. You just have to get your brain around it. Don't always run the same loop. Pick new courses to stimulate your mind or find a hottie that is out for a jog and follow within viewing (but not stalking) distance.

My mental breakthrough came during a run down Coronado beach. Before this run I had trouble going farther than a 10K run. That evening I jogged down the beach just after sunset and a dense fog rolled in. I couldn't see farther than 20 feet. It was a cool and comfortable night and I tooled down the beach listening to the waves breaking on the shore. I wasn't wearing a watch and when I decided it was time to head home, I turned east to hop on the road for my return jog and discovered that I was 5.5 miles from my starting point. 11 miles round trip - I had never gone over 7.5 before. Huge mental breakthrough and I ran my first half-marathon two months later.

One last question. How old are you?
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 5:00:31 AM EDT
Those little satin shorts help!
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 4:21:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/29/2005 4:22:33 PM EDT by AvengeR15]

Originally Posted By H46Driver:

My mental breakthrough came during a run down Coronado beach. Before this run I had trouble going farther than a 10K run. That evening I jogged down the beach just after sunset and a dense fog rolled in. I couldn't see farther than 20 feet. It was a cool and comfortable night and I tooled down the beach listening to the waves breaking on the shore. I wasn't wearing a watch and when I decided it was time to head home, I turned east to hop on the road for my return jog and discovered that I was 5.5 miles from my starting point. 11 miles round trip - I had never gone over 7.5 before. Huge mental breakthrough and I ran my first half-marathon two months later.

One last question. How old are you?




I'm 25.

I had a similar breakthrough a couple of years ago. I was in marginally better shape at the time, but I was still only running two or two and a half miles at a time. One day I went out jogging and just kind of zoned out, listening to my portable radio and thinking about the upcoming work Christmas party. Before I knew it, I had run 10.2 miles in something like 1:37. On two other occasions I've been able to zone out as well, once running 9 miles, another time running 8. So, if I can just get my body working at the subconscious level again, I'll be fine.

Thanks for the info. I appreciate it.



Link Posted: 12/30/2005 3:52:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AvengeR15:

I'm 25.

I had a similar breakthrough a couple of years ago. I was in marginally better shape at the time, but I was still only running two or two and a half miles at a time. One day I went out jogging and just kind of zoned out, listening to my portable radio and thinking about the upcoming work Christmas party. Before I knew it, I had run 10.2 miles in something like 1:37. On two other occasions I've been able to zone out as well, once running 9 miles, another time running 8. So, if I can just get my body working at the subconscious level again, I'll be fine.

Thanks for the info. I appreciate it.




My pleasure. Get out there and take advantage of the mild winter you have so that you will be able to train through the summer.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 12:08:49 PM EDT

I started running with two SF soldiers this week, every morning before duty. Now, basically every part of my body is sore .

We ran 5 miles this morning, and I did it in 46:15. Not great, but better than I expected. I hope to cut that time down to 38:00 or so. I've lost about 8.5lbs total, and am eating much better, and drinking lots of water now. Things are progressing well. I've learned it's as much about training my mind as it is training my body.

Link Posted: 1/31/2006 5:25:07 PM EDT
Tag for some info. I started running about 3 weeks ago and suck
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 10:14:56 PM EDT
I started running this week, and I suck BAD. I am 24 and I have not run more then a 1/4 mile since highschool. I am thinking about becoming a police officer and am tying to get ready for the PT test. We only have to run 1.5 miles in 14 min. It does not sound hard and im sure it would be very easy for most of you, but it has been 6 years since I have run like that. I work as a parking valet right now and we run all day at work but not more then 150 yds at a time. If I could just get the breathing down I would be ok. any tips?

thanks James
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 11:58:59 PM EDT
Plan on running 4 days a week.

I read about a program that I passed on to several friends and it worked great. Its 6 weeks to running 3 miles.

Week 1 Run 1 minute walk for 5 minutes repeat 5 times
Week 2 Run 2 minutes walk for 4 minutes repeat 5 times
Week 3 Run 3 Minutes walk for 3 minutes repeat 5 times
Week 4 Run 4 minutes walk for 2 minutes repeat 5 times
Week 5 Run 5 minutes walk for 1 minute repeat 5 times
Week 6 Run 30 minutes non stop.

If you follow this program work on covering your time goals. You dont need to run fast just fast to stay faster than a walk. Speed will come with the time. This program works well while running on a track or loops in a park (yeah it might get boring but its a convienent place to go) You dont want to skip too fast in this program follow the time frame. many people get very discouraged becuase they got out run and they are sore and they can not go out a again for a day or two.

Get good shoes before you start. And make a commitment to see this plan thru. I find with my schedual running Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday work best
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:08:49 PM EDT
that sounds like a good plan. thanks alot
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 8:53:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/22/2006 8:53:57 AM EDT by Hartmann]
I was always bad aerobically, even when playing sports in school. 18 months ago I started a plan like Sixgun listed and now run about 20 miles per week. I'll be competing in my second race, an 8K in 2 weeks. I'm 38.

You can definitely do it. The key is to combine walk/run and run SLOWLY for a while until your body is used to it. It feels like you are wasting your time, too easy, but trust me your body needs that time to adapt. Before you know it you'll be running races.

The book I use and recommend is Running Start to Finish.
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