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Posted: 6/25/2003 5:38:25 PM EDT
sounds dumb but i usually get short of breath before my body gets tired from running. So are there any ways to increase your air flow in order to have more stamina while running??
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 4:55:22 AM EDT
I think nobody has answered because there basically is no answer, except to keep running and inhale/exhale as deeply as you can. This article from [url=www.runnersworld.com/home/0,1300,5-60-63-245,00.html]Runner's World[/url] is a good explanation. Beginning Runner's Guide: Breathing by Hal Higdon Breathing is a very natural activity--and so is getting out of breath when you run When you run, you get out of breath. This is normal. This is natural. Your body runs on oxygen, just as your automobile runs on gasoline. When you start to exercise--whether running, walking or any other physical activity--your muscles need more oxygen. The body meets this need by supplying oxygen-rich blood to the muscles. The lungs work harder to absorb this oxygen out of the air. You get out of breath. Without giving it much conscious thought, most runners breathe in a 2/2 rhythmic ratio. They take two steps as they inhale; they take two more steps as they exhale. While running very slowly, they often breathe in a 3/3 ratio. While running very fast, they might breathe 2/1, or 1/1, but 2/2 is much more common. If you count breaths in and out and discover you are breathing with a different rhythm, don't worry about it. Adjusting your breathing pattern will not make you a better runner. The same with whether you breathe through your nose or your mouth. Most runners naturally breathe through both. Famed New Zealand coach Arthur Lydiard, when asked how runners should breathe, once replied: "Breathe through your mouth. Breathe through your nose. Suck the air in through your ears, if you can." Your jaw should be relaxed, your mouth slightly open. The oxygen will come through your nose and mouth to your lungs, to your blood and to your muscles without you needing to give it a lot of thought. Breathing is a very natural activity--and so is getting out of breath when you run.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 5:29:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/27/2003 5:30:02 AM EDT by u-baddog]
Diaphragm is filled first, then chest. If you are not using your diaphragm/stomach muscles to fill you lungs you are short changing yourself.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 7:00:40 AM EDT
Originally Posted By mike45acp: sounds dumb but i usually get short of breath before my body gets tired from running. So are there any ways to increase your air flow in order to have more stamina while running??
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I do not condone the use of drugs, but I will fill you in in what some runners have done illegally, only because it is possible to "have more staminia" beyond what nature intended for you. 1) Using drugs to increase the number of oxygen carrying red blood cells 2) Using inhalers to improve breathing No doctor is going to help you unless you have a viable, medical reason to use these things.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 11:47:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By u-baddog: Diaphragm is filled first, then chest. If you are not using your diaphragm/stomach muscles to fill you lungs you are short changing yourself.
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so I fill my stomach first? could you explain that for me?
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 4:10:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By mike45acp:
Originally Posted By u-baddog: Diaphragm is filled first, then chest. If you are not using your diaphragm/stomach muscles to fill you lungs you are short changing yourself.
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so I fill my stomach first? could you explain that for me?
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Never take air into your stomach unless you want to impress the girls with a belch. Think about the lungs as a two stage container. The first stage is the lower part, it fills mostly with the use of the diaphragm. The second stage is the upper part or the chest area. The lower part fill first then the upper. If you are unsure what the muscle group the diaphragm is then Google it. There are exercises that are tailor made to expand your lung capacity
Link Posted: 6/30/2003 12:43:11 PM EDT
take a look at circular breathing. [url]http://www.mills.edu/LIFE/CCM/DIDJERIDU/instruction/lesson_circular_breathing.html[/url] it made me the windbag i am today.
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