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Posted: 9/5/2010 6:13:29 PM EDT
I'm working pretty hard in the gym lately. I have some definite goals and prime among them is to dump a little belly fat
and improve my muscle definition primarily by fat reduction.

I'm ALMOST satisfied with my strength levels and overall physique. If I got my body fat percentage down to "see the six pack and serratus muscles" then I think I'd be very close to what I want to see.


Mondays I work out with a varied workout which places emphasis on strength gains so I can achieve my defined strength goals, and I do the same thing on Fridays. On Wednesdays, I do a lighter workout and an hour of hard cardio exercise. I'll switch my workouts to lighter
weights for definition AFTER I've met my raw strength goals.

I take a variety of supplements, including Creatine, L-Arginine, and drink whey shakes.

Supposedly, I need a gram of protein per pound of body weight, at minimum, to sustain rapid muscle growth.

The catch is, I'm now at 220 pounds. Though my belly has shrunk lately, my weight is increasing. I can only presume it's muscle mass
increases. I've certainly worked hard enough to earn some!

But what kind of a diet is going to give me at least 220 grams of quality protein if I don't intend to be eating mountains of food? I've never
been a big eater. (Yet I can still sustain more belly than I want to have...go figure.)

I'm making a difficult demand on myself here....slightly more muscle mass and strength while at the same time trying to cut belly fat. This
will demand a high protein but low bulk diet. Give me some suggestions if you have any.


CJ


Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:31:47 PM EDT
Fish 20-25grams, some protein drinks net 30-35grams a serving but can be expensive.

Do a search for "Foods with most protein" I think turkey is in there.

From what Ive read, Protein comes from certain foods AND how they are cooked and processed.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:34:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:37:14 PM EDT by pinpointshot]
The high protein with low amount of food gets boring quick but building muscle is no easy chore and if you are already this commited I'm sure you can handle it.

Chicken- Boneless skinless chicken breast is my favorite as far as taste and protein amount. Usually 80-90% protein by calories with the rest being fat. The Frozen bag in my freezer has 20g of protein per serving with a serving only compromising 100 calories

Tuna- I eat canned tuna in water, Usually about 88% protein. 2oz is a serving with 2 servings per normal 5oz can(about 4oz drained). Usually 11g of protein per serving which is only 50 calories.

Eggs- Large egg is normally 6g of protein.

Salmon- low calorie, high protein like tuna.

Milk-cheap, when I bulk I drink atleast half a gallon of chocolate milk a day, not good at all to lose weight but skim milk has 8g of protein and 80-90 calories per serving. Protein in milk is casein which is digested and absorbed slowly (2-3 hours) so its great to drink right before bed and I drink it a few hours before my workouts.

Most other meats such as steak, ground beef (I opt lean ground sirloin unless grilling burgers and such) will have high amount of protein but can also add high amounts of calories so adjust intake according to diet.

Nuts- almonds are great, high in protein but also high in fat, these are very calorie dense but packed full of healthy fats.

These are the main staples of high protein/ low volume foods to me.

Oh and of course whey protein which is absorbed quickly, fairly cheap, and helps supplement more protein where you cannot get it all from food.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 7:21:20 PM EDT
Whey protein, steak, chicken, fish, eggs.


I eat around 180-200 (I weigh 200 with 20% body fat) grams of carbs a day because Im cutting and mantaining my muscle mass. You must get at least 1gram per lean body weight in order to keep and gain your muscles or you will end up losing some muscle mass as well. Find out what your body fat is and your weight then detrmine yor lean body weight.

Whey protein has anywhere from 40-60g of protein per serving and its a must thirty mintues or less after a workout.

For me its eggs for breakfast
Whey protein shake
Chicken for lunch
Chicken or fish in the afternoon
Whey protein after lifting
Steak.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 8:53:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 8:55:47 PM EDT by mattsd]
you are discovering why they say you should expect to gain 2 lbs of fat for every lb of muscle when trying to gain serious mass. mass diets are a bitch. remember that to fuel your mass building efforts you need plenty of carbs too. trying to eat 200g of protein plus enough carbs to keep your body in "building" mode requires "eating mountains of food," for most people at least.

Years ago, when i did the whole mass building diet thing, it looked something like this:

breakfast: 12 eggs (6 whole, 6 whites only), one piece of whole grain toast with peanut butter

mid morning snack: either an optimum whey shake, or a can of tuna (plus multivitamin dose)

lunch: 4 grilled chicken breasts and 1 cup of oatmeal or brown rise

mid afternoon snack: tuna

Post lifting snack: whey shake

Dinner: something similar to lunch, but with a little more variety (still some variation of 4 chicken breasts and some reasonable carby side)

Night time snack: a bowl of scrambled egg whites, or tuna, or maybe oatmeal and a whey shake.

I started to feel sick just typing that.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:03:27 AM EDT
You don't need as much protein as people tell you that you need. A good portion of the protein bodybuilders eat gets wasted or unused because all that protein they're eating strips the body of vitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for muscle growth and utilization. By upping your intake of vitamin A rich foods, you can usually end up putting on more muscle because you'll be able to utilize more of the protein you're already eating. An added benefit is you'll increase your testosterone production and glycogen. Both of which will give you more energy and stamina and help you put on more muscle.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 10:18:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Tekka:
You don't need as much protein as people tell you that you need. A good portion of the protein bodybuilders eat gets wasted or unused because all that protein they're eating strips the body of vitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for muscle growth and utilization. By upping your intake of vitamin A rich foods, you can usually end up putting on more muscle because you'll be able to utilize more of the protein you're already eating. An added benefit is you'll increase your testosterone production and glycogen. Both of which will give you more energy and stamina and help you put on more muscle.


This is something so many people over look.

Those on high protein diets who ignore Vitamin A are wasting time, money and taking in usless calories.

I take 3 small 30,000 IU pills a day.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 10:59:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2010 11:07:49 AM EDT by Andrewphillipf]
Originally Posted By Chris_C:
Originally Posted By Tekka:
You don't need as much protein as people tell you that you need. A good portion of the protein bodybuilders eat gets wasted or unused because all that protein they're eating strips the body of vitamin A. Vitamin A is needed for muscle growth and utilization. By upping your intake of vitamin A rich foods, you can usually end up putting on more muscle because you'll be able to utilize more of the protein you're already eating. An added benefit is you'll increase your testosterone production and glycogen. Both of which will give you more energy and stamina and help you put on more muscle.


This is something so many people over look.

Those on high protein diets who ignore Vitamin A are wasting time, money and taking in usless calories.

I take 3 small 30,000 IU pills a day.


+1

Too much protein also strips your body of calcium making your bones weak.


OP let me tell you what I did.

I was 185 and 16.5% body fat in May. I'm 5'11".

I switched to 6 - 8 tiny meals a day. Cut out anything processed (as much as I could).
Small meals could be carrots and a thing of string cheese. (get real cheese, not the stuff that claims less fat). Or an apple and some nuts and seeds. Regular meals would be small portions of meat and veggies.

I continued working out at least 4 days a week and I do at least 8 reps of everything. I wasn't trying to get big at all.

Long story short I'm 170 now and 11% body fat. All my clothes seem to fit me the same but I think that I look a lot better.

Edited to add: I don't think it looks like I've been gaining much muscle but I've gained a lot of strength through the process.

Edit #2: Chris, do you take the vitamin A with anything? I read somewhere that it needs a lot of fat with it to be absorbed into the body. Ever hear that?
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 7:25:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Andrewphillipf:
Edit #2: Chris, do you take the vitamin A with anything? I read somewhere that it needs a lot of fat with it to be absorbed into the body. Ever hear that?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_A#Deficiency "Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin and depends on micellar solubilization for dispersion into the small intestine, which results in poor utilization of vitamin A from low-fat diets."

For some quantification, check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotretinoin#Pharmacokinetics
Isotretinoin is a vitamin A derivative, and the article says "peak plasma concentration more than doubled when taken after a high-fat meal versus a fasted condition" although it fails to cite the source (sounds right though).
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 8:11:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fstop:
Originally Posted By Andrewphillipf:
Edit #2: Chris, do you take the vitamin A with anything? I read somewhere that it needs a lot of fat with it to be absorbed into the body. Ever hear that?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_A#Deficiency "Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin and depends on micellar solubilization for dispersion into the small intestine, which results in poor utilization of vitamin A from low-fat diets."

For some quantification, check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotretinoin#Pharmacokinetics
Isotretinoin is a vitamin A derivative, and the article says "peak plasma concentration more than doubled when taken after a high-fat meal versus a fasted condition" although it fails to cite the source (sounds right though).


I read that when eating or drinking low fat milk or cheese that the vitamins don't absorb that well. I wonder how much is optimal.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 9:45:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2010 9:47:04 PM EDT by JasonC]
I am thinking you need to add a little cardio into your routine -if you not already doing it. Cardio will accelerate the developement of that six pack and aid in gaining lean muscle mass. Also, remember that you should be taking 1gram of protein per 1lb of LEAN body weight (Total Bodyweight - Body Fat in lbs.). You may be consuming too many protein shakes (i.e. too many calories).
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 5:16:02 AM EDT
Thanks for the tips.

Yes, I do get in some cardio work. At least once a week I do a solid hour of hard cardio. Usually I do it if I'm still sore from the previous workout. My endurance has built to the point that I can go much longer than an hour with my heart rate over 150 but I don't want to try to turn it into a marathon since that much time in the cardio zone starts to eat into muscle. Given my age and weight, the computer on the
elliptical trainer just flashes red lights at me all the time when it senses my heart rate. But I have a higher heart rate reserve capacity
than is typical. I usually fool the machine and tell it I'm 25 and then it's happy.


I'm only using a moderate protein shake dose. Actually less than originally recommended to me, as I discovered that too much just goes
right through me.
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