Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 9/2/2010 5:47:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/2/2010 5:47:46 PM EDT by Prairie_Dog]
Let me start by saying that I AM A TOTAL NOOB when it comes to this.

Looking for a decent receiver that I can hook up to an external antenna, and yet be portable if I have to bug out for any reason.

Something I can use as a tabletop and mobile? Maybe even battery powered?

Any help will be greatly appreciated... Thanks.
Link Posted: 9/2/2010 5:57:06 PM EDT
this Sony might fill the bill. However it won't recieve the VHF air band. It will recieve the HF air frequencies which are used for overseas flights.Sony ICF7600
Link Posted: 9/2/2010 6:18:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By KB7DX:
this Sony might fill the bill. However it won't recieve the VHF air band. It will recieve the HF air frequencies which are used for overseas flights.Sony ICF7600


Excellent...

What would you recommend for an external antenna?
Link Posted: 9/2/2010 8:29:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/2/2010 8:33:06 PM EDT by KB7DX]
A random length of wire should work fine unless you want to get fancy. The longer the better for the low bands.
You may want to check this one out too. I haven't read anything on this Grundig, but it will do the VHF air band.
Grundig
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 2:59:33 AM EDT
I have the G6 Aviator, It constantly amazes me that this small package pulls in AM signals so well!
It will fit in your shirt pocket, yet really sensitive FM/AM broadcast, and SWL AM.
The SSB for the Ham bands is worthless. IMO

Airband works as well, granted I live 5mi. los from the field. The usefullnes of this band varied with your distance from the field, and how busy of a strip it is.
ATAS is handy to hear at times.

I have 100-someodd ft of wire on my ft-857D, and (for SWL) can't stress enough how sensitive the G6 is given the ant. size on it!

I would loose SSB and Airband to monitor 2m though.
JB
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:15:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2010 6:16:10 AM EDT by Prairie_Dog]
Originally Posted By KB7DX:
A random length of wire should work fine unless you want to get fancy. The longer the better for the low bands.
You may want to check this one out too. I haven't read anything on this Grundig, but it will do the VHF air band.
Grundig


OK... How long are we talking here? 1-2 feet? Or several, like 20-30?

Will the wire need to be kept straight? Or can it be looped, like around a window frame?

Insulated? Or stripped bare?
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 3:33:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Prairie_Dog:
Let me start by saying that I AM A TOTAL NOOB when it comes to this.

Looking for a decent receiver that I can hook up to an external antenna, and yet be portable if I have to bug out for any reason.

Something I can use as a tabletop and mobile? Maybe even battery powered?

Any help will be greatly appreciated... Thanks.
If you are not really considering getting your license, a good digital hand-held scanner might fill the bill nicely. You can get them battery powered and can et adapters to attach a remote broad-banded antenna.

Digital trunking scanner:

http://www.scannermaster.com/Uniden_Bearcat_BCD396XT_Police_Scanner_p/10-501358.htm
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 3:37:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Prairie_Dog:
Originally Posted By KB7DX:
A random length of wire should work fine unless you want to get fancy. The longer the better for the low bands.
You may want to check this one out too. I haven't read anything on this Grundig, but it will do the VHF air band.
Grundig


OK... How long are we talking here? 1-2 feet? Or several, like 20-30?

Will the wire need to be kept straight? Or can it be looped, like around a window frame?

Insulated? Or stripped bare?

Usually, the longer the better, but it depends on what frequencies you are trying to listen to.

No, the wire need not be straight, but it does need to be kept as far away from sources of interference as possible.

Insulated or bare, either, but with insulated wire it isn't as apt to short out if it touches something metal. Signal degradation...not sparks type short.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 4:57:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2010 4:59:52 PM EDT by Prairie_Dog]
Originally Posted By pcsutton:

Originally Posted By Prairie_Dog:
Originally Posted By KB7DX:
A random length of wire should work fine unless you want to get fancy. The longer the better for the low bands.
You may want to check this one out too. I haven't read anything on this Grundig, but it will do the VHF air band.
Grundig


OK... How long are we talking here? 1-2 feet? Or several, like 20-30?

Will the wire need to be kept straight? Or can it be looped, like around a window frame?

Insulated? Or stripped bare?

Usually, the longer the better, but it depends on what frequencies you are trying to listen to.

No, the wire need not be straight, but it does need to be kept as far away from sources of interference as possible.

Insulated or bare, either, but with insulated wire it isn't as apt to short out if it touches something metal. Signal degradation...not sparks type short.


***Not sure on freq., mostly AM and SW...

***What would you consider some common sources of interference in a typical home?

Ok... say I build a loop antenna. Would it be better to keep it vertical? Would it hurt reception if it was horizontal, yet 10-15' off of the ground? What about loop diameter?
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 7:13:50 PM EDT
Loop? There are several very different antennas referred to as loops. If you mean the small loop receiving antenna you see included with some portable radios, they usually work best vertical and broad side to the signal you want to hear. They are actually quite directional for such a small antenna, which can also be an advantage in blocking out unwanted noise sources.

But if you can string out a random wire outside it'll work a lot better.

In my old SWL days (and I'm talking about a LONG time ago), I had a Hallicrafters 5R10A with a home made BFO and about a hundred feet of wire strung out through the trees. Never had more fun SWLing than with that simple setup.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 9:46:53 PM EDT
To the OP... be very, very careful.

First it's just a radio. Then you start wanting a nice desktop all band receiver.

First thing you know, things get blurry and you wake up one morning with a headache and a ham license.

I should know, it happened to me.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 9:52:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Prairie_Dog:
What would you consider some common sources of interference in a typical home?



Fluorescent lighting (but not all), light dimmers, wall warts ("AC adapters"), plasma TV's, some modems, CRT type computer monitors, my Mom's old Singer sewing machine (would mess up all TV channels and radio), electric fence boxes, bad power transformers on your power pole, bad street lights, dirty or cracked insulators on power poles, and many more.

Link Posted: 9/3/2010 9:54:54 PM EDT
And get a radio first... then we can start talking loops. I've got LOTS of links for receiving loops.

AM radio, the Broadcast Band, aka MW or Medium Wave, 530 - 1700 khz, a tuned loop is the schiznitz. Will pull in signals that random wires just won't get. And in a package 18" - 24" across.

I've also built quite good tuned SW loops.
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 6:30:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
To the OP... be very, very careful.

First it's just a radio. Then you start wanting a nice desktop all band receiver.

First thing you know, things get blurry and you wake up one morning with a headache and a ham license.

I should know, it happened to me.


That's what I'm hoping for... Well. minus the headache...
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 4:32:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
I've got LOTS of links for receiving loops.

I've also built quite good tuned SW loops.



I would actually like to see some of those links. Where I am right now I could make use of a couple good loops.
Top Top