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Posted: 9/13/2010 7:28:42 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 7:51:10 AM EDT
Interesting.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 7:53:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2010 7:55:42 AM EDT by PA22-400]
I'll just leave this here


Oops, pic set too small––The logo reads "United Nations University."
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 7:57:35 AM EDT
While I don't appreciate the UN and global warming BS, this is a viable thing.



While they don't say so, I imagine they would exclude any halogenated plastics (like PVC) for a multitude of reasons.


I've said it multiple times, and I'll say it again here, one day, we will be mining our landfills because they will be the most dense concentrations of raw materials available.

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 8:13:08 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 8:13:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2010 8:17:42 AM EDT by txgp17]
Wow. I need one for the home.
Originally Posted By mattfoley:
I've said it multiple times, and I'll say it again here, one day, we will be mining our landfills because they will be the most dense concentrations of raw materials available.
I agree.
They did a show on the History Channel a while back about recycling. One guy who was running one of the recycling centers mentioned how technology, and market demand will change such that we return to landfills to reclaim materials.

Just think of the people who purchased former landfill real estate for pennies on the dollar, will now have people offering them huge sums to get it back.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 8:17:21 AM EDT
Originally Posted By mattfoley:
While I don't appreciate the UN and global warming BS, this is a viable thing.



While they don't say so, I imagine they would exclude any halogenated plastics (like PVC) for a multitude of reasons.


I've said it multiple times, and I'll say it again here, one day, we will be mining our landfills because they will be the most dense concentrations of raw materials available.



I believe you are correct. My question is, why we are not doing that right now? Baltimore, MD. has had a large power generating garbage incinerator in downtown for decades. I imagine that the technology available today would allow for refining of this process even more efficiently.

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 9:01:25 AM EDT
I've been doing some searching the last half hour or so, since I read this topic.

The company selling this technology is Envion. It was REALLY hard to find pricing info on their stuff, but I finally found a reported $6-7 million for one of the big 10,000 ton-per-year models in a Washington Post article. The article also states that at that time (about a year ago) a unit had recently been assembled in Montgomery County, MD at the Derwood waste facility. I haven't been able to find a AAR on it, however. The last paragraph makes it sound like it wasn't going to be there for long.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 9:57:45 AM EDT
The questions that nobody is asking.....
1. How much power is that machine using to get a liter of oil?
2. He says in the video that he gets a liter of oil from one kilo of plastic. He is claiming almost 2 pounds of oil for each 2.2 pounds of plastic put in. MmmK

I'm for recycling, but real world economics utopian idea
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 10:06:16 AM EDT
Thing looks a bit like a stil. Replace mash with plastic heat to just under 400 degrees Celsius and collect the gas that comes off in a water bath. Interesting overall and fairly simple to make. I wonder how wide of temperature range you can have on this, and how one would separate into Gas, Diesel and Kerosene?
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 12:21:59 PM EDT
One of the article I read on it said $10 worth of electricity per barrel of oil, but didn't state the actual measurement of energy required.

I also saw mention that it uses an far-infrared ray in an oxygen-less atmosphere, and that there is a byproduct of "non-hazardous ash."

They claim up to 60,000 barrels of oil per 10,000 tons of plastic, so 60,000 barrels X 42 Gal per Barrel = 2,520,000 gallons x 7 lbs/gallon (just a guess) = 17,640,000 lbs = 8,820 tons of oil per 10,000 tons of plastic. So, thats a 88.2% recovery rate, however, on their website they claim and average 62% recovery rate. So my numbers are either a best case scenario, or I screwed up somewhere

I agree it sounds too good to be true, but, if you could pull those numbers from it (62%), one of those machines would produce about enough diesel to run 27 trucks for a year, assuming 10 gal of diesel per barrel, and 250 gallons used per truck each week. And you'd still have gasoline, kerosene, and whatever else you might be able to pull out of it.

I really want to know specifics on how it works.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 3:03:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2010 3:12:40 PM EDT by mattfoley]
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