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Posted: 9/11/2010 12:16:49 PM EDT
ok I don't think we have covered this or I missed out on the thread. so what do you all think would be a good base to start with for SHTF lighting? I have two flashlights for every room in the house most are mini-mag lights some with LED conversions and that's about it. I know I would like to keep all the lights AA so I don't have to stock different batteries. but I'm thinking what I have just wont cut it. what lanterns,flashlights, portable lights , do you have or recommend.

thanks, sigxo45
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 12:50:06 PM EDT
the Mini-Mag is seriously outdated... especially when for about $12 each, with free shipping you can get a 140 lumen or so LED light that takes one AA from DealXtreme.

they have a variety of lights.. some are better than others. some have the variable levels.

if you want nicer lights, Fenix and a few other brands have some VERY nice LED lights, run on on AA, AAA and 123A batteries, plus a few other tupes.

there are some nice LED lanterns available... more suitable for lighting up a room than a handheld flashlight. there have been a few threads recently.

and headlights are always nice because they point where you look and free up your hands.

i like AAs for general purpose lighting and 123As for weapon lights. i'm not a big fan of AAAs
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 1:35:11 PM EDT
now is the right time to check for clearance of solar lights at home depot etc.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 9:38:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2010 9:40:52 AM EDT by speedracer422]
Paging Batmanacw....


I think he has like 40+ LED lights


Personally, I like the headlamps. They are the greatest thing for camping, hiking, power outages, etc...
Also, the red LEDs that many headlamps offer, don't destroy your natural night vision, nor do they attract bugs when you are getting into your tent


I have an old school Surefire G2 w/ an upgraded lamp assembly that puts out 120 lumens and runs about 30 mins on 2x123As
I just keep it in the truck for emergencies or if I'm trying to find an address at night.
As the other poster mentioned, you can buy AA LED lights that are more powerful and last longer for ~$10 now

There are some serious flashlight junkies on here; I'm shocked this thread isn't 3 pages yet


As for area lighting, I think that a regular old white gas lantern (or 2) and a can of fuel, is much easier than worrying about electronics/batteries/moisture, etc...




Speed
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 9:50:12 AM EDT
I would highly recommend against using a gas or propane lantern indoors for lighting. For SHTF lighting we are generally talking about grid-down, lights out situations where you will be spending time indoors without power. Avoid open flames and gas exposure indoors if at all possible.

LED lanterns have come a long way in just the past couple of years. There are alot of small ones that will light up a room just fine and that run on AAs. Just Google or search Amazon.com "AA LED lantern light" and you will get a ton of ideas. Get a couple or three of these for a typical home and a decent supply of batteries (we use Eneloops with solar charging capability and have a basically indefinite supply) and you're GTG.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 10:17:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fisterkev:
I would highly recommend against using a gas or propane lantern indoors for lighting. For SHTF lighting we are generally talking about grid-down, lights out situations where you will be spending time indoors without power. Avoid open flames and gas exposure indoors if at all possible.

LED lanterns have come a long way in just the past couple of years. There are alot of small ones that will light up a room just fine and that run on AAs. Just Google or search Amazon.com "AA LED lantern light" and you will get a ton of ideas. Get a couple or three of these for a typical home and a decent supply of batteries (we use Eneloops with solar charging capability and have a basically indefinite supply) and you're GTG.

I don't see a problem; that's kinda how folks light their homes for the past few thousand years

Hell, the Amish still use paraffin/oil lanterns...they seem to be doing ok.

Speed
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 11:05:25 AM EDT
I have flashlights, Coleman lanterns, and two totes of candles I have picked up at garage sales. I have too many lanterns in fact. I keep finding them for under $5 at garage sales. Three of them need globes but otherwise are functional.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 12:37:09 PM EDT
solar yard lights used in house. Put them outside during day to charge, at night in house they bright enough for most tasks. The little 2 AA battery operated laterns when you need more light. A good tact light and what you have sounds like you will be covered. less $100 the most expensive will be the tact light. LAPOLICEGEAR.com has some surefires on sale now.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 12:48:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2010 1:11:03 PM EDT by oldrock]
if you want to keep things simple... go with everything powered by AA batteries. Then buy yourself a few dozen eneloop batteries and a good ac smart charger plus a good solar charger and you will be set. Then just get a few single AA flashlights for carry and for weapon lights, a few AA mini lanterns for room light and call it done. It is what we did and makes life so simple. I really like the Akoray 1xAA lights. Very bright and compact with a metal clip that allows it to ride perfectly in the front pocket of blue jeans. I've carried one daily for almost 2 years now and not a bit of trouble. I get about an hour of light on bright or 2-3 hours on medium and alot of hours on low.

For lanterns, I am currently using mini colemans which are ok but I'd upgrade if someone knows of better ones that ran on 4 or less AA and doesn't cost crazy amounts of money. The mini colemans are cheap and bright enough to see but not quite bright enough to play cards comfortably by. I wish the colemans were about 25% brigher than then they would be perfect imho.

One of the keys to using AA format is the rechargable eneloop batteries...nothing better imho. I have 24 of them and they make things so simple. Charge em and forget about em till you use them. Once you drain them, just charge em back up and you are good to go for another 500 charges or so.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 3:01:13 PM EDT
Check out my thread about LED lanterns.
Batman's latern addiction thread


Also, sell those maglites at the garage sale. They eat batteries and perform very poorly. Check out my single cell LED thread.
Batman's single cell addiction thread


Then check out C-S's thread on long running Bug out Bag lights.
Poor C-S's soon to be a light addict thread


You want a light that is reliable with a very, very long run time on a set of batteries. Its not just the over all brightness you need to look at. Pocket rockets are fun, but not as useful long term. You want multi-mode lights that have very low modes for working in the dark with dark adjusted eyes. Quark's 0.2 lumen moon light mode seems silly when you turn it on during the day, but well into the night you will marvel at all you can see with such a ridiculously low mode, and you won't tell everyone within a mile that you are there if they don't see the light directly. When you realize that it will run for 720 hours on one set, then it really becomes an asset.


Check out Eneloops and the Powerex Maha C-9000 charger. It was an education. You can properly maintain your batteries and have them up to snuff when the time comes to need them. Also, the eneloops have a very slow self discharge rate, so they will have 85% of their power after a year on the shelf. That is why they are special. There are other rechargeables that have more capacity, but none that hold onto it as well.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 3:27:37 PM EDT
thanks for all the info guys, now its time to shop....
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 4:51:20 PM EDT
Harbor Freight has a bunch of solar lights that do not need batteries . Just a thought
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 5:23:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2010 5:23:56 PM EDT by Hawk_308]
I have LED red marker lights in the basement that are wired into my battery bank along with some battery operated white leds over the work areas . When the red lights are on it looks like Im in Das Boot or the back room of a strip club lol
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 5:34:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2010 5:36:11 PM EDT by Skibane]
The AA battery size is a good choice for most lights - It has decent power density, it's cheap, it's sold just about everywhere, is also available in affordable rechargeable versions, and can be used in a lot of other devices besides flashlights. If you're going to standardize on just one battery size, AA would be one of the best choices you could make.

A dimmable LED light is VERY versatile - You get high brightness when you need it, and long battery life the rest of the time. One decent dimmable light can do the job of two or three different non-dimmable lights.

I'm not much on battery-powered lanterns. Indoors, a good conventional LED flashlight can often do the same job of a lantern, simply by aiming the beam at the ceiling.

You definitely want at least a few LED headlamps in your collection - They are VERY handy for doing repairs, reading or just navigating around in the dark.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 5:36:03 PM EDT
raovac sportsman extreme lantern......uses d but is a hell of an led lantern for 25.00
streamlight rechargeables....3 liteboxs (2 spot 1 led flood) led spot retrofit kit on order. stinger led hp.........awsome light
cheap led from sams......2 for 20 bucks
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 5:43:12 PM EDT
for the BOL....

12v batts.....inverter.....and led X-mas lights.....have the batt hooked up to a solar maintainer.

a car batt will run a strand of 50 X-mas lights for days.

you can also buy the 12v sockets and run the plug in "lighter lights" as lamps.

or stick with lanterns....
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 5:49:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2010 5:09:57 PM EDT by uncool]
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

Originally Posted By fisterkev:
I would highly recommend against using a gas or propane lantern indoors for lighting. For SHTF lighting we are generally talking about grid-down, lights out situations where you will be spending time indoors without power. Avoid open flames and gas exposure indoors if at all possible.

LED lanterns have come a long way in just the past couple of years. There are alot of small ones that will light up a room just fine and that run on AAs. Just Google or search Amazon.com "AA LED lantern light" and you will get a ton of ideas. Get a couple or three of these for a typical home and a decent supply of batteries (we use Eneloops with solar charging capability and have a basically indefinite supply) and you're GTG.

I don't see a problem; that's kinda how folks light their homes for the past few thousand years

Hell, the Amish still use paraffin/oil lanterns...they seem to be doing ok.




Speed




no problem till their is one.......I have never heard of somone knocking over an led lantern and burning down their house.......have you ?

EDIT....I have 6 kerosene lamps from the place in ohio..(cant remember the name) . They have their place.....for me its EOTWAWKI......after the batteries are gone.....its just a chance not worth taking.....
well except for romance........greatest light in the world for that
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 5:55:29 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Echo2:
for the BOL....

12v batts.....inverter.....and led X-mas lights.....have the batt hooked up to a solar maintainer.

a car batt will run a strand of 50 X-mas lights for days.

you can also buy the 12v sockets and run the plug in "lighter lights" as lamps.

or stick with lanterns....



My plan is to recharge my eneloops on fast chargers from my deep cycle battery, that is charged with my solar panels. The great part of this plan is that I have enough batteries and lanterns and can charge enough batteries that I can go for literally weeks on 1 hours worth of charging. I can charge 8 batteries every 20 mins. One set of 3 or 4 batteries will easily run a week of regular use in any of my lanterns or flash lights.

I will have less than 2 hours of charging per week and probably a lot less frequent than that, but I am not sure how many lanterns I will need in rotation for 30 people or so.

Once every few charges I can use my Maha charger to refresh the batteries without fear of running down the deep cycle battery too much.


I will have a lot of unused capacity with the solar system I have right now. I will probably double its in the next few months.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 6:08:25 PM EDT
12 volt lighting pictured below. Get yourself some quality batteries, charge controllers, and a solar panel, good to go. I have 10 of these stands for around the house……








Link Posted: 9/12/2010 8:22:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

I don't see a problem; that's kinda how folks light their homes for the past few thousand years

Hell, the Amish still use paraffin/oil lanterns...they seem to be doing ok.


With propane and gasoline? No, they haven't. Oils are relatively safe - they're pretty close to candles on the combustibles range. Gas and propane are far more volatile and far more prone to bad accidents. Candles, oil lamps, and the like are fine as long as some basic caution is used. Using a gas powered lantern or a propane stove is far more dangerous, as it is far more likely that one would accidentally release more gases than intended and not be able to control the outcome than with an oil or a candle. Volatility is the key, and why in our house all such devices are outdoor devices.

You're free to burn or blow up whatever you like in your home I suppose, but I for one would recommend against using gases indoors. Again.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 8:49:38 PM EDT
Sam's has some great 4 watt GU10 [whatever] LED track lamps in a 2-pack.

I put 2 over my SO's sink and 'counter' in the container and damn, it looks like something out of a gay kitchen redo magazine.

I was shocked and so was she with how good it made things look and how nicely it brightened the area.

Brighter than hell and and easy to install with a track light strip.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 8:50:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fisterkev:
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

I don't see a problem; that's kinda how folks light their homes for the past few thousand years

Hell, the Amish still use paraffin/oil lanterns...they seem to be doing ok.


With propane and gasoline? No, they haven't. Oils are relatively safe - they're pretty close to candles on the combustibles range. Gas and propane are far more volatile and far more prone to bad accidents. Candles, oil lamps, and the like are fine as long as some basic caution is used. Using a gas powered lantern or a propane stove is far more dangerous, as it is far more likely that one would accidentally release more gases than intended and not be able to control the outcome than with an oil or a candle. Volatility is the key, and why in our house all such devices are outdoor devices.

You're free to burn or blow up whatever you like in your home I suppose, but I for one would recommend against using gases indoors. Again.


Yep, I'd only consider lamp oil/kero in a confined space like we live in on the mtn.

See my thread on Aladdin lamps.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 8:52:32 PM EDT
beeswax candles

great for heating in the winter too
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 8:56:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By snakeshooter1:
solar yard lights used in house. Put them outside during day to charge, at night in house they bright enough for most tasks.


And you can pick 'em up for ridiculously low prices - Under 3 bucks, in some cases.

However, several minor disadvantages:

1. They don't work when the sun isn't shining. For example, during a hurricane, you may not be able to get a solar recharge for several days.

2. The batteries self-discharge in just a few weeks - which means that when TSHTF, you may need to stick 'em out in the sunshine for a day or so before you get any light out of them.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 8:59:18 PM EDT
I also have UCO candle lanterns with bee's wax candles. The bee's wax candles cost about twice as much as parafin, but they smell way better with a lot less smoke over the parafin based candles.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:27:46 AM EDT
Originally Posted By EXPY37:
See my thread on Aladdin lamps.


These are what we use, at least when it's not hot outside. They do throw off some heat...

-Slice
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:41:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2010 6:42:42 AM EDT by speedracer422]

Originally Posted By EXPY37:
Originally Posted By fisterkev:
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

I don't see a problem; that's kinda how folks light their homes for the past few thousand years

Hell, the Amish still use paraffin/oil lanterns...they seem to be doing ok.


With propane and gasoline? No, they haven't. Oils are relatively safe - they're pretty close to candles on the combustibles range. Gas and propane are far more volatile and far more prone to bad accidents. Candles, oil lamps, and the like are fine as long as some basic caution is used. Using a gas powered lantern or a propane stove is far more dangerous, as it is far more likely that one would accidentally release more gases than intended and not be able to control the outcome than with an oil or a candle. Volatility is the key, and why in our house all such devices are outdoor devices.

You're free to burn or blow up whatever you like in your home I suppose, but I for one would recommend against using gases indoors. Again.


Yep, I'd only consider lamp oil/kero in a confined space like we live in on the mtn.

See my thread on Aladdin lamps.

Meh, I've yet to burn down a camp/house w/ a lantern.

I can see a safety concern, but I'm honestly not that concerned. I mean, I have loaded firearms laying around.
Neither the gun or the lantern is going to do much w/o stupid human interaction.


The only real con I see w/ a gas lantern is the fumes, but that goes for a Kero heater just the same. Crack a window or open a door for few minutes and you're good.

I have LED lanterns, candles, and various oil lamps, but when the power goes out for any length of time (and it does pretty frequently here), i fire up a white gas lantern.
It's like a 60 watt bulb. I like it.

YMMV, but relying on solar power to charge anything where I live is spotty at best. We get very little annual sun here.
I have a healthy stash of batteries, but you just can't beat the low operating cost, simplicity and amount of light from a white gas lantern.
Plus, white gas never goes bad.


Speed
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:54:50 AM EDT
I keep a 3-D mag light on every floor with an upgraded LED bulb that was discused and recomended on here. MUCH brighter then a standard mag-Light LED bulb! I also have one in each car and another in the garage.

I have a few handheld 123 Hanheald lights around the home including my Surefire Z2 that stays on the hightstand. I also keep some of the small AAA headband style lights around along with AA powered LED lanterns.

I also have Oil Lamps, Kerosene Lanterns, Solar powed landscape lights and a longer term favorite of mine I have 12-v LED Rope light. Rope light uses very little power and with a deep cycle battery it would provide basic lighting for an extended period as we as powering a small portable TV or radio. Even have the 12-v cigaret adapter and splitters so we can run multiple items as necessary.

We have other stuff too (candles, other flashlights, weapon lights, etc) but we keep AAA, AA, 123, and D batteries on hand in bulk as well as the fact I have plenty of AA powered Solar lights and extra solar batteries so we can recharge those to get us through the dark times too.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 12:47:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2010 1:00:03 PM EDT by Hunters_Moon]
Originally Posted By fisterkev:
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

I don't see a problem; that's kinda how folks light their homes for the past few thousand years

Hell, the Amish still use paraffin/oil lanterns...they seem to be doing ok.


With propane and gasoline? No, they haven't. Oils are relatively safe - they're pretty close to candles on the combustibles range. Gas and propane are far more volatile and far more prone to bad accidents. Candles, oil lamps, and the like are fine as long as some basic caution is used. Using a gas powered lantern or a propane stove is far more dangerous, as it is far more likely that one would accidentally release more gases than intended and not be able to control the outcome than with an oil or a candle. Volatility is the key, and why in our house all such devices are outdoor devices.

You're free to burn or blow up whatever you like in your home I suppose, but I for one would recommend against using gases indoors. Again.



You might get an agreement out of me with gas lanterns, kerosene lanterns etc...but propane? I guess it depends on the setup and what you're using it for. LP was and is the choice for cooking stove/ovens, water heaters, space/wall heaters etc. in the rural area where I live. Most of my neihbors have a 250 lb. propane tank in the yard. Remember that Natural Gas distribution was only available in urban areas in the recent past. I'ld guess that LP has been used in homes for somewhere around 90 yrs.

While a direct comparision between LP and NG would probably show natural gas to be safer, I rather like the fact that I control the distribution of propane to my home. If there is an emergency I shut it off, rather than waiting for the gas company to show up. If I wanted or needed to, I could hook the entire tank to a truck or tractor and drag it away from the house.

If you're accident prone or not mechanically inclined maybe it isn't for you. I don't know the exact numbers to compare LP to electricity in terms of safety, but I do know that thing with four wheels sitting in my driveway scares me alot more.

Edit: For what it's worth I use LED Lanterns and LED flashlights first. Then I turn to lanterns using candle oil. As a last resort I would go to candles, but frankly they scare me more than most lanterns of any type.

I also think that the biggest danger in most lanterns is knocking them over or leaving them too close to combustibles.

But worrying about "the accidental release of gases" as Kev put it would depend on the tank size. Your average lantern of any type with a built in tank doesn't have enough fuel to fill the airspace of your house...a closet perhaps. Those that run off 10 lb. tanks (BBQ grill sized) might be capable of saturating a room ( the fittings on those tanks tend to be of a lower grade and more likely to fail due to handling than a dedicated home tank.)
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 12:50:15 PM EDT
When I built my house I hardwired an LV lighting system and installed a small 150 watt solar system with a couple of golf cart batteries. Technology was a little scarcer in '98 when we built but the Sharp panels still work and the charge controller has gone through some evolution. Low Voltage 7 watt sconce lights in every room. I can light every room in the house for a couple of weeks without sun to recharge the batts.we use these lights as a matter of course daily. Several different LED flash lights / headlights around (although I bow to batman on this topic). Have 4 white gas lanterns as well as several kerosene lanterns with enough fuel, wicks and spare parts to last about 30 years. So the answer I think is varying degrees of technology with some tried and true methods to fall back on.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:00:35 PM EDT
Kinda reminds me I need to add more Kerosene to my preps! 12-galons was enough when it was only feeding my lanterns - I bought a pair of Kerosene heaters so perhaps I should have 120-gal on hand
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 1:40:53 PM EDT
This.

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 2:14:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hunters_Moon:
Originally Posted By fisterkev:
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

I don't see a problem; that's kinda how folks light their homes for the past few thousand years

Hell, the Amish still use paraffin/oil lanterns...they seem to be doing ok.


With propane and gasoline? No, they haven't. Oils are relatively safe - they're pretty close to candles on the combustibles range. Gas and propane are far more volatile and far more prone to bad accidents. Candles, oil lamps, and the like are fine as long as some basic caution is used. Using a gas powered lantern or a propane stove is far more dangerous, as it is far more likely that one would accidentally release more gases than intended and not be able to control the outcome than with an oil or a candle. Volatility is the key, and why in our house all such devices are outdoor devices.

You're free to burn or blow up whatever you like in your home I suppose, but I for one would recommend against using gases indoors. Again.



You might get an agreement out of me with gas lanterns, kerosene lanterns etc...but propane? I guess it depends on the setup and what you're using it for. LP was and is the choice for cooking stove/ovens, water heaters, space/wall heaters etc. in the rural area where I live. Most of my neihbors have a 250 lb. propane tank in the yard. Remember that Natural Gas distribution was only available in urban areas in the recent past. I'ld guess that LP has been used in homes for somewhere around 90 yrs.

While a direct comparision between LP and NG would probably show natural gas to be safer, I rather like the fact that I control the distribution of propane to my home. If there is an emergency I shut it off, rather than waiting for the gas company to show up. If I wanted or needed to, I could hook the entire tank to a truck or tractor and drag it away from the house.

If you're accident prone or not mechanically inclined maybe it isn't for you. I don't know the exact numbers to compare LP to electricity in terms of safety, but I do know that thing with four wheels sitting in my driveway scares me alot more.

Edit: For what it's worth I use LED Lanterns and LED flashlights first. Then I turn to lanterns using candle oil. As a last resort I would go to candles, but frankly they scare me more than most lanterns of any type.

I also think that the biggest danger in most lanterns is knocking them over or leaving them too close to combustibles.

But worrying about "the accidental release of gases" as Kev put it would depend on the tank size. Your average lantern of any type with a built in tank doesn't have enough fuel to fill the airspace of your house...a closet perhaps. Those that run off 10 lb. tanks (BBQ grill sized) might be capable of saturating a room ( the fittings on those tanks tend to be of a lower grade and more likely to fail due to handling than a dedicated home tank.)

Ya, idk what exactly is the primary concern there; At first I thought fisterkev was just worried about flames, but I think he might be describing a Fuel-Air explosive?


FWIW, I just helped my neighbor buy a propane camp stove and propane lantern. Last year we were w/o power for over a day and I invited her up to drink coffee I cooked w/ my percolator on my white gas stove. She was so impressed w/ the lantern and stove (some folks don't really get out much) that she asked for help in buying her own before this winter.

I told her go w/ the propane cause it's cheaper (initially) and there is no mess or fumes. It's a kinda idiot proof system.



Speed
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:41:55 PM EDT
here's a great lantern for inside the house

http://www.amazon.com/Rayovac-SE3DLN-Sportsman-300-Lumen-3D-Battery/dp/B0018S4XIS

or outside, too. runs on D cells, but if you go with the eneloops, you can use the AA's with an adaptor.

I second the headlamps––keeps the hands free and goes where your eyes go. for handhelds i go with malkoffs and surefires. malkoffs are bulletproof, but you'll pay for them. makes your AA maglites look like a child's toy––in a smaller package.

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:53:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By EllisWyatt:
When I built my house I hardwired an LV lighting system and installed a small 150 watt solar system with a couple of golf cart batteries. Technology was a little scarcer in '98 when we built but the Sharp panels still work and the charge controller has gone through some evolution. Low Voltage 7 watt sconce lights in every room. I can light every room in the house for a couple of weeks without sun to recharge the batts.we use these lights as a matter of course daily. Several different LED flash lights / headlights around (although I bow to batman on this topic). Have 4 white gas lanterns as well as several kerosene lanterns with enough fuel, wicks and spare parts to last about 30 years. So the answer I think is varying degrees of technology with some tried and true methods to fall back on.




(Batman strokes his precious new Jetbeam E3S)

Link Posted: 9/13/2010 5:33:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/13/2010 5:42:33 PM EDT by fisterkev]
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

Ya, idk what exactly is the primary concern there; At first I thought fisterkev was just worried about flames, but I think he might be describing a Fuel-Air explosive?

FWIW, I just helped my neighbor buy a propane camp stove and propane lantern. Last year we were w/o power for over a day and I invited her up to drink coffee I cooked w/ my percolator on my white gas stove. She was so impressed w/ the lantern and stove (some folks don't really get out much) that she asked for help in buying her own before this winter.

I told her go w/ the propane cause it's cheaper (initially) and there is no mess or fumes. It's a kinda idiot proof system.

Speed


I was talking about propane and gas lanterns, not about propane systems rigged *and designed from the outset* to be used indoors. Comparing a home cooking/heating propane system to a propane or gas lantern is not a very good comparison, as one was designed specifically for home use with indoor appliances, and the other was designed specifically for camping - outdoor use, generally in well ventilated areas (don't forget carbon monoxide issues, on top of the fire hazards). If I won't store the fuel inside the house - and I don't, all of my gas and propane is out back in the shed, away from the house - then I'm sure as hell not going to burn it inside the house. I've got propane cooking, heating, and lighting equipment, but inside the house I am going electric / battery-powered. Seriously, think about where you store the fuel, and why.

As I said, if you want to burn your house down fine, I just hope you're not my neighbor.

You can't go wrong with LED lighting nowadays.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:02:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fisterkev:
Originally Posted By speedracer422:

Ya, idk what exactly is the primary concern there; At first I thought fisterkev was just worried about flames, but I think he might be describing a Fuel-Air explosive?

FWIW, I just helped my neighbor buy a propane camp stove and propane lantern. Last year we were w/o power for over a day and I invited her up to drink coffee I cooked w/ my percolator on my white gas stove. She was so impressed w/ the lantern and stove (some folks don't really get out much) that she asked for help in buying her own before this winter.

I told her go w/ the propane cause it's cheaper (initially) and there is no mess or fumes. It's a kinda idiot proof system.

Speed


I was talking about propane and gas lanterns, not about propane systems rigged *and designed from the outset* to be used indoors. Comparing a home cooking/heating propane system to a propane or gas lantern is not a very good comparison, as one was designed specifically for home use with indoor appliances, and the other was designed specifically for camping - outdoor use, generally in well ventilated areas (don't forget carbon monoxide issues, on top of the fire hazards). If I won't store the fuel inside the house - and I don't, all of my gas and propane is out back in the shed, away from the house - then I'm sure as hell not going to burn it inside the house. I've got propane cooking, heating, and lighting equipment, but inside the house I am going electric / battery-powered. Seriously, think about where you store the fuel, and why.

As I said, if you want to burn your house down fine, I just hope you're not my neighbor.

You can't go wrong with LED lighting nowadays.


I think CO is the big issue with pressurized gasoline/white gas lanterns indoors. Seems like we had a discussion about that last year and TJ chimed in w/ some wisdom –– or was that about heaters?

Anyway, I'd be very careful just to make sure you wake up, assuming you don't burn the place down. A fual-air explosion seems like a minimal risk in comparison to CO poisoning.

-Slice
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 6:05:58 PM EDT
White gas and propane lanterns inside are a bad idea. 100 years ago houses were not built as tight and had a lot of air exchange with the outside even when closed up. Building technology has made for a tighter envelope. Gas lanterns produce a lot of carbon monoxide (CO). You may not get a toxic level in a day or two, but it builds up and doesn't leave the body readily. CO poisoning creeps up on you and kills you when you sleep.
There was another thread or three on this forum hashing this out thoroughly. Bottom line, kerosene lamps OK, gas mantle lamps not good indoors.
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 12:19:43 PM EDT
I started off with just some cheap flashlights, some cheap oil lamps for indoor use, and some candles.

I still have all of that but have added better flashlights, more oil lamps and still made for indoor or outdoor use, and a few more candles.

I also got some solar yard lights for free so I wandered off with them and the person who talked about possably not being able to get them to charge in a storm or whatever is correct. But they are a start and I have a lot of aa stuff for flashlights and headlamps.

I also have some lithium aa batteries as well as regular alkaline aa batteries around the house.

I will have neighbors and family needing stuff if things go for very long so I have a fair bit of extra stuff and repair stuff on hand and extra lamp oil and what not as well.

I also have one of the little led lanterns I got in last year's christmas exchange and I like it a lot for summer use.

In the winter the extra heat from the oil lamps would be very nice to have along with their light output.
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