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Posted: 9/9/2010 5:07:46 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 5:28:17 AM EDT
The storage tanks that I have been involved with have had a sump drain and valve. Just regularly drain off the condensation water.


hope this helps
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 5:34:45 AM EDT
I have a 300 gallon and a 500 gallon diesel tank setup on my ranch. They are gravity fed with outlets on the bottom front of the tanks with a filter/water separator plumbed in just after the outlet. I use Power Svc. and a biocide when I fill them and have had zero issues with water accumulation even when storing fuel for well over a year. I think the filter/water separator is the key to why my system has never had a problem. At least for me, bacteria growth is a much bigger potential issue and that is why I use the biocide.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 5:52:18 AM EDT

We have a 300gal gravity tank. At first we had some water issues. Added a water separating filter, then the problems never came back. We change them once a year. We do cycle through the fuel relatively quickly though. It's not really for long term storage, but daily use. We completely cycle it about every 3 months, but get a fill once a month or so.

-Slice
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 5:58:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 6:16:45 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Feral:
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:

We have a 300gal gravity tank. At first we had some water issues. Added a water separating filter, then the problems never came back.


I'd like to have a water separating filter but since this tank will be pumped from the top I guess I'll have to settle for a sump drain like PA22 mentioned.



in line water separator can be plumbed in just about anywhere in the system. just come out of the tank and install it right there then run your hose from that.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 6:23:46 AM EDT
Originally Posted By mylt1:
Originally Posted By Feral:
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:

We have a 300gal gravity tank. At first we had some water issues. Added a water separating filter, then the problems never came back.


I'd like to have a water separating filter but since this tank will be pumped from the top I guess I'll have to settle for a sump drain like PA22 mentioned.



in line water separator can be plumbed in just about anywhere in the system. just come out of the tank and install it right there then run your hose from that.


I think you're right LT. Ours just went where the old "normal" filter went. Assuming you're going to have some sort of filter, just spend the extra $12 on a water separating filter.

-Slice
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 7:25:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 7:30:23 AM EDT by Ops]
BTDT more times than I care to remember..

If you are using a top feed hand pump, go to TSC and buy a Goldenrod filter assembly and a couple extra filter elements, and install it on the outlet of the hand pump.

When you install the hand pump, install it on the opposite end of the tank from the drain fitting. Install a hand valve on the drain fitting, and when you set the tank in place, set the tank with the hand valve end about 1-1/2" below the pump end. Any water will accumulate in the low end, and periodically crack the hand valve and see what comes out. If you get water, stick a container under it and drain off the water.

Do NOT use a water dispersant! Use a water coalescent instead and periodically drain the tank. Water and oil mixed together = cutting oil.

Gimme a yell, I may be over at FIG on Saturday for training. LMK if you want me to stop by.

Ops

ETA: I add one gallon of Walmart two stroke oil and 64 oz of Power Service when I get the offroad fuel tank filled. ULSD has little lubricity and the 2 stroke oil replaces the lubricants removed with the sulphur.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 7:29:06 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 7:31:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 7:32:07 AM EDT by Ops]
I'll be busy all day on Sat - SAR training for CAP. I may have an hour or two around supper time.

Ops
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 8:52:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Ops:

Do NOT use a water dispersant! Use a water coalescent instead and periodically drain the tank. Water and oil mixed together = cutting oil.


Ops,

Can you give examples of which products fit into which category?

Thanks,
-Slice
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 12:14:42 PM EDT
I have a 500 gallon gravity tank for on road diesel and I use a drum with a hand pump for my off road diesel for the tractor. On both of them I use a Goldenrod filter from tractor supply, it filters as well as removing water. I use Pri-D in both tanks. They both get cycled a couple times a year.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 2:37:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By HomeSlice:
Originally Posted By Ops:

Do NOT use a water dispersant! Use a water coalescent instead and periodically drain the tank. Water and oil mixed together = cutting oil.


Ops,

Can you give examples of which products fit into which category?

Thanks,
-Slice


Most over the counter products that advertise as "removing water" are water dispersants. These are usually alcohol based.

http://www.powerservice.com/cd/


Coalescers are usually part of the filter assembly,

Ops
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 4:09:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 4:10:20 PM EDT by kkunz]
Our 3 fuel tanks are owned by the local co-op fuel supply as long as we buy fuel from them there is no charge for the tank or tank matinees we go through a lot of diesel in the summer and about ½ the summer amount in the winter. The co-op uses something like this on all of out thanks and we have hade zero issues with water except when we got a bad batch from the refineries we fuel every thing from old as dirt equipment to new Mack tractor trucks and dump trucks and I feel confident the fuel quality coming out of the tanks is as good or better than what can be bought at the fuel depot the co-op does a great job monitoring the filters and check them weekly when the tanks are filled the tanks also have drain plugs that are checked regular but rarely need drained. Power service additive has gotten a lot better in the last few years but I don’t like it, it use to be alcohol base and it was very hard to injection pumps all of our additive we use is stanadyne its hard to argue with their products especially since they actually make injection pumps and diesel fuel systems this I just my oppionion so you and other do as you want.






Link Posted: 9/9/2010 5:54:44 PM EDT
Feral,

Take a look at page 4 of this paper: Pre-Pump filter paper to find a list of widely available water separator filters using a pretty cheap Napa 4770 filter head (about $22 or so) and $10 or less filters. Some of these filters already have water drains in them, making it easier than heck to drain water from your fuel regularly.

Do not use anything that will disperse the water into the fuel; water in fuel is not good for diesel engines, especially the newer ones.

Good luck.

Merlin

Link Posted: 9/9/2010 6:00:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2010 6:27:20 PM EDT by VaFarmBoy]
We were having trouble with water in our 2,000 gallon diesel tank. This tank had no drain on it. We drained the tank completely, then I went to the end of the tank away from the pump and torched a hole at the very bottom of the end cap. To that I welded a bung which was nothing more than a female to female pipe threaded union. To this, I screwed in a good quality ball valve. Before refilling with fuel, I elevated the oppositer end(pump end) of the tank by a little more than an inch. The tank was refilled with a eye on the new valve to make sure I had no leaks.

Now any water that may have come in with the new load of fuel, or any condensation from the tank sitting outside, drains to the rear of the tank, away from the pump and pickup tube. Once or twice a year you can put a small container under the valve and open it. The off highway fuel is red and anything else is either clear or nasty looking. I let it flow until it runs red then I am done.

We also have a filter on the pump, and use a treatment when the tank is filled. This has cut down on the diesel related repairs significantly. Before I did this, we had sporadic issues with most likely condensation. One summer, we got some bad fuel, and spent several thousand dollars replacing injectors and rebuilding injector pumps until I fixed this tank. Just make sure that whoever does the welding does a good job, and this will be the best investment of time and money you ever spent. Anyone with any further questions about it is welcome to IM me here.

EDIT....one other note. When you get a delivery of diesel fuel, let it sit for at least a day before you pump any out. This will let anything in the fuel settle out, and flow to the rear of the tank.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 6:27:03 PM EDT
feral, I have a smaller tank I got from oldgrouch here on arfcom and it is plumbed with a valve on the bottom to release water. That's how i do it.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 6:31:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 6:32:31 PM EDT by Hawk_308]

Originally Posted By Ops:
BTDT more times than I care to remember..

If you are using a top feed hand pump, go to TSC and buy a Goldenrod filter assembly and a couple extra filter elements, and install it on the outlet of the hand pump.

When you install the hand pump, install it on the opposite end of the tank from the drain fitting. Install a hand valve on the drain fitting, and when you set the tank in place, set the tank with the hand valve end about 1-1/2" below the pump end. Any water will accumulate in the low end, and periodically crack the hand valve and see what comes out. If you get water, stick a container under it and drain off the water.

Do NOT use a water dispersant! Use a water coalescent instead and periodically drain the tank. Water and oil mixed together = cutting oil.

Gimme a yell, I may be over at FIG on Saturday for training. LMK if you want me to stop by.

Ops

ETA: I add one gallon of Walmart two stroke oil and 64 oz of Power Service when I get the offroad fuel tank filled. ULSD has little lubricity and the 2 stroke oil replaces the lubricants removed with the sulphur.
This

tilt is your friend .

I had several tanks on the farm and all of them were tilted a little .

Link Posted: 9/10/2010 8:16:58 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 1:56:50 PM EDT
tag for later
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 3:18:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Ops:
ETA: I add one gallon of Walmart two stroke oil and 64 oz of Power Service when I get the offroad fuel tank filled. ULSD has little lubricity and the 2 stroke oil replaces the lubricants removed with the sulphur.


Ditto here. I add one ounce per gallon of the Wally World 2 stroke oil to my diesel. It definitely makes for a happier motor since we've been saddled with this ULSD crap.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 3:56:21 PM EDT
good info here. tag for a future project.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 4:48:46 PM EDT
I've had seven 55 gallon drums in a conex trailer for 4 years now. Pulled a sample today after reading all this. The oldest diesel which was two years old almost to date with no additives was a little milky looking but had no issues as far as water . Think there was some gear oil in the drum that wasnt flushed out cauing the thicker then normal color.I did run it through a fleetguard FF 105 to catch anything as far as fungus.Guess i'll start running some additives to be on the safe side.

Thanks for the good info guys
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 5:04:14 AM EDT
All of our fuel storage tanks on the farm have inline water filters that take care of that. You may want to look into getting water filters. Basically it's inline before or after (I can't remember which) the pump so anytime the fuel goes through a pump it also goes through a water filter. You just have to remember to occasionally drain the water out of the filter until you get good clean fuel coming out (use that fuel to start a fire or something).
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