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Posted: 1/2/2023 8:19:42 PM EST
I'm not sure if this is technical enough to belong in this forum, but...

Starter reloader kits. Worth it? Could I piece together what I need elsewhere, better and/or cheaper? Any good ones to look out for? Etc...

I'm not entirely sure what I absolutely need and don't. Obviously a press and scale, die for the size I need, what else? I have calipers already at least...

And is there a good resource to just watch how this is done? Youtube being the pieces of shit they are, no videos there...
Link Posted: 1/2/2023 8:23:09 PM EST
[Last Edit: RodMI] [#1]
A kit is a good start but get 2 quality beam scales you don't wont to be over on the load. Lee is a good entry kit the scale is junk I probably would go with RBC then use Lee die sets. You will won't to upgrade the kit if you find you like reloading plan on that. Cut some wire as a check weight once you find your loads. You will always have a use for a single stage press for rework or working up a load.

https://rumble.com/user/76HighboyReloading

https://castboolits.gunloads.com/
Link Posted: 1/2/2023 8:31:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: azmp5] [#2]
It kinda depends on what you want to do and how much you REALISTICALLY are going to do.

I started on a dillon 550B and used it for probably 5-6 years b4 I got a 650.  Everything from 9mm, 45, 357 to 556, 308 and 7mm.

You can usually find your "basic" equipment used and cheap.  Beam scale, trimmer, tumbler (even though I recommend wet tumbling with a F.A.R.T. or the F.A.R.T. lite).  

I will say I'm glad I started on a 550 vs a single stage, solely cause even when I started reloading I was doing about 5-6k 9mm and 556 a year.  Once I got to the point I was doing 1k a month, I got the 650 with a bullet and case feeder.

As far as WHAT kits, LEE, RCBS, Hornady all make a decent kit and pretty affordable.
Link Posted: 1/2/2023 8:42:58 PM EST
[#3]
I’ve started several folks with RCBS rock chucker supreme kits.  Single stage and pretty solid for rifle / low volume.  

Lots of folks getting out of the game.    Shop around locally for used, I’ve picked up a couple of really nice sets lately to fill gaps.
Link Posted: 1/2/2023 10:32:54 PM EST
[#4]
I'm still using my Lee Anniversary Kit that I bought in 2003.  The only parts I've replaced were the beam scale (seemed to work alright for pistol loads) and the toggle on the press broke, so they sent me the updated version.  Otherwise, thousands and thousands of rounds loaded without issue.
Link Posted: 1/3/2023 12:21:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: eye-gor] [#5]
Kits usually have at least one thing you'll want to end up replacing and there are a few things you'll want that aren't in most kits...

I was given a press and a promise of powder and primers... and I'm also a poor, so I did things one piece at a time, though I looked at a kit figuring "well, having two single stage presses is almost like having a progressive..." but there was still a bunch of fiddly bits to buy to get what I wanted.

Also, if you shop for certain tools on Amazon you can avoid the "reloading brand" tax or "gun stuff" tax on a lot of things.  Good example is a set of calipers - I paid $25 for a Lyman branded set, my son paid $10 on Amazon for a Sinclair Scientific branded set and they are the same darn thign with a different sticker and box stamp.  


Oh, and as far as production goes - if you do things in batch processes, you can get 100-200 rounds done on a single stage in about a hour.  IE, first process would be deprime/resize, then toss in tumbler.  Next go round would be trimming if needed.  Next go around would be to prime the cases.  Then next go around would be to actually load 'em.  

I've got a ton of brass but I'm feeding bolt guns and typically shoot 50-100 rounds in a session, so I keep a "working group" of 200-250 cases.  Once I start seeing failures in them (neck cracks, etc) I'll just recycle the whole bunch and get a fresh batch from the buckets.
Link Posted: 1/3/2023 10:54:43 PM EST
[#6]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By eye-gor:
Kits usually have at least one thing you'll want to end up replacing and there are a few things you'll want that aren't in most kits...

I was given a press and a promise of powder and primers... and I'm also a poor, so I did things one piece at a time, though I looked at a kit figuring "well, having two single stage presses is almost like having a progressive..." but there was still a bunch of fiddly bits to buy to get what I wanted.

Also, if you shop for certain tools on Amazon you can avoid the "reloading brand" tax or "gun stuff" tax on a lot of things.  Good example is a set of calipers - I paid $25 for a Lyman branded set, my son paid $10 on Amazon for a Sinclair Scientific branded set and they are the same darn thign with a different sticker and box stamp.  


Oh, and as far as production goes - if you do things in batch processes, you can get 100-200 rounds done on a single stage in about a hour.  IE, first process would be deprime/resize, then toss in tumbler.  Next go round would be trimming if needed.  Next go around would be to prime the cases.  Then next go around would be to actually load 'em.  


I've got a ton of brass but I'm feeding bolt guns and typically shoot 50-100 rounds in a session, so I keep a "working group" of 200-250 cases.  Once I start seeing failures in them (neck cracks, etc) I'll just recycle the whole bunch and get a fresh batch from the buckets.
View Quote
That's what I do.  One stage at a time, I do all the brass I have in that caliber laying around, multiple calibers if I have time.  I end up with a bunch of primed casings ready for boolits and boompepper.
Link Posted: 1/4/2023 12:37:19 AM EST
[#7]
Look at the rcbs partner press kit.
Link Posted: 1/6/2023 12:59:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: Shinobi15] [#8]
okay...

what's everyone's thoughts on this? since it showed up in my email.

https://palmettostatearmory.com/hornady-lock-n-load-classic-deluxe-kit-85010.html?avad=293137_f2d751e55&utm_source=Avantlink&utm_medium=Referral&utm_campaign=el

if it helps, my plan is to load 300 norma mag, 308, maybe 9mm if i feel like it, and possibly 6 arc someday because that's next on the list.
Link Posted: 1/6/2023 1:43:54 PM EST
[#9]
I'm not seeing $200 extra value - https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item/00005085003/lock-n-load-classic-single-stage-press-reloading-kit

And $300 buys a lot of extras - https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item/0004487472/partner-press-reloading-kit-2
Link Posted: 1/11/2023 12:03:12 AM EST
[#10]
okay...

can someone spell out what i absolutely need, what's a nice to have, what's a only-if-you-do-such-and-such, and what's a waste?

this is surprisingly difficult to figure out with google searches.
Link Posted: 1/11/2023 12:56:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: W_E_G] [#11]
This kit, plus a set of dies for whatever caliber you reload, will get you well on your way.

https://leeprecision.com/bench-prime-press-kit.html

https://leeprecision.com/bench-prime-press-kit.html


Attachment Attached File



While its an older reference, I used this to learn the basics from scratch.
$20 used book on eBay.
Very helpful.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/403750958227

Attachment Attached File


Link Posted: 1/11/2023 12:59:31 AM EST
[#12]
You can end up spending a fortune on reloading gear.

You don't have to spend a fortune to reload.

Don't do it if you are only doing it for the notion of saving money on ammo.

You will not save money on ammo. You will only get to shoot more.

If the process of loading ammo is drudgery to you, then reloading is not for you.

I started reloading in 1984. I thought it was cool as shit.

I still think its cool as shit.
Link Posted: 1/11/2023 1:09:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: W_E_G] [#13]
If you choose to reload bottleneck rifle cartridges, please also invest in a case gage.

Without a case gage, you will never know whether your resizing die is set up correctly.

Without a correctly set-up resizing die, you will have problems with your reloads either being too short (causes case-head separations on firing), or too long (causes bolt to not close).

I lot of folks like the Wilson-type drop-in case gage. Those gages are OK.

I think the RCBS Precision Mic is better, and it doesn't cost a lot.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000MOAU18?tag=arfcom00-20

Attachment Attached File


Here's a video I made that talks about use of the Precision Mic tool.
You won't have a set of headspace gages to "calibrate" the tool as I did in the video, but you won't NEED to do that either.
You can basically "calibrate" your Precision Mic by using a round of good-quality factory ammo to determine where your case shoulder on your reloads needs to be.
Push the shoulder on the spent case back to the same dimension as a round of factory ammo, and you'll be where you need to be.


Wilson type gage

https://www.brownells.com/reloading/measuring-tools/case-gauges-headspace-tools/wilson-case-gage-prod33287.aspx

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 1/11/2023 2:25:18 PM EST
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:
okay...

can someone spell out what i absolutely need, what's a nice to have, what's a only-if-you-do-such-and-such, and what's a waste?

this is surprisingly difficult to figure out with google searches.
View Quote


Assuming 223 or some other simple bottle neck rifle -

Press, dies (sizing and bullet seating), shell holder, some method of priming (I prefer a hand priming tool), some method of measuring powder (Lee scoop system, scale, scale + measure, scale + measure + trickler), case lube, micrometer/calipers, powder, primer, bullets

If the stars align and you don't need to trim your brass or ream your primer pockets or any other case prep this will let you reload at a minimal level.

You will eventually end up with the scale + measure + trickler for powder dispensing and you'll need a way to trim cases sooner rather than later.  Then you'll hit a crimped primer and need a primer pocket reamer (get both large and small) and depending on what you do about case trimming you'll probably need something to chamfer the case mouths too. And while you can get away without it for a bit, you really do need a way of cleaning the cases, so tumbler and media and such.
Link Posted: 1/12/2023 2:05:18 PM EST
[#15]
now i'm just looking at this...

https://www.rcbs.com/rcbs-kits/rebel-master-reloading-kit/16-9251.html

...for around 360 delivered. i'll get some dies and plates or whatever else when needed.

anyone care to talk me out of this plan?
Link Posted: 1/12/2023 4:58:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: W_E_G] [#16]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:
now i'm just looking at this...

https://www.rcbs.com/rcbs-kits/rebel-master-reloading-kit/16-9251.html

...for around 360 delivered. i'll get some dies and plates or whatever else when needed.

anyone care to talk me out of this plan?
View Quote



That looks like a good kit.

That said, I've had mixed results with the RCBS hand-priming tool. Mine doesn't seat the primers as fully as I would like.
Be sure all primers are seated at least flush with the case head. Preferably a couple thousandths BELOW the case head.

I'm glad to see they are using a digital scale instead of a beam scale. This is the 21st century after all.

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 1/12/2023 5:20:21 PM EST
[#17]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By W_E_G:



That looks like a good kit.

That said, I've had mixed results with the RCBS hand-priming tool. Mine doesn't seat the primers as fully as I would like.
Be sure all primers are seated at least flush with the case head. Preferably a couple thousandths BELOW the case head.

I'm glad to see they are using a digital scale instead of a beam scale. This is the 21st century after all.

https://www.ar15.com/media/mediaFiles/105614/Untitled_jpg-2669693.JPG
View Quote


right???

okay, good to know about the hand primer, i'll watch closely.

can you explain how to make sure the die is set correctly to seat the bullet at a certain depth when changing dies out?
Link Posted: 1/12/2023 7:34:18 PM EST
[#18]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:


right???

okay, good to know about the hand primer, i'll watch closely.

can you explain how to make sure the die is set correctly to seat the bullet at a certain depth when changing dies out?
View Quote


I have both a Lyman and a RCBS hand primer.  Much prefer the Lyman.  FWIW that kit looks very complete, but if price is important you can get very similar by starting with a less complete kit and adding a couple of items...

As far as bullet seating goes.... depends on if you want crimp or no crimp, and if you do want crimp, do you do it as a second pass or as part of seating? I prefer no crimp but when I need/want to I do it as a second pass...

Here's how I set it up with my Hornady dies (some dies may be different, other users certainly could be different...).  With the Hornady seating/crimping die, the die depth in the press (controlled via lock ring position) is what controls the crimp, and the bullet seating stem has a secondary adjustment to control depth.

1 - trimmed to length, resized UNPRIMED case onto the shell holder, raise ram to cam-over/TDC, screw die in until it contacts case mouth and back it off two turns, set lock ring.  

Now no matter what, the crimp part of the seat/crimp die doesn't kick in

2 - unscrew seater most of the way, put bullet on that unprimed case and raise ram again.  When ram at TDC/cam-over, screw in seater until it touches bullet.  Lower ram, screw in seater two or three more turns, and raise ram and then lower.   The bullet should now be minimally seated.  Get out the calipers and measure COAL.  Put case w/ partially seated bullet back on, turn seater screw in one full turn, raise and lower ram, measure again.  The difference between the two measurements is how much a full turn changes the seating depth.  Do some math, twist the seater stem in, raise and measure, rinse and repeat until you have correct length.

Now take that round w/o powder or primer but properly seated bullet and go see if it chambers OK, etc.   Then figure out some way to mark, label, or ID it (super fine sharpie writing on case works) for bullet type etc.  Next time you need to load that bullet to that length, put it in, raise ram to TDC/cam-over, screw seater in until it contacts the bullet and you are done.

Link Posted: 1/12/2023 10:23:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: rrbgeb] [#19]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:
now i'm just looking at this...

https://www.rcbs.com/rcbs-kits/rebel-master-reloading-kit/16-9251.html

...for around 360 delivered. i'll get some dies and plates or whatever else when needed.

anyone care to talk me out of this plan?
View Quote



Looks like a solid foundation.  The rebel takes priming off the press and is supposedly an upgrade over the rockchucker.  

The plus kit with powder stand and a few other goodies might be a good option.
Link Posted: 1/13/2023 1:08:23 AM EST
[#20]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By eye-gor:


I have both a Lyman and a RCBS hand primer.  Much prefer the Lyman.  FWIW that kit looks very complete, but if price is important you can get very similar by starting with a less complete kit and adding a couple of items...

As far as bullet seating goes.... depends on if you want crimp or no crimp, and if you do want crimp, do you do it as a second pass or as part of seating? I prefer no crimp but when I need/want to I do it as a second pass...

Here's how I set it up with my Hornady dies (some dies may be different, other users certainly could be different...).  With the Hornady seating/crimping die, the die depth in the press (controlled via lock ring position) is what controls the crimp, and the bullet seating stem has a secondary adjustment to control depth.

1 - trimmed to length, resized UNPRIMED case onto the shell holder, raise ram to cam-over/TDC, screw die in until it contacts case mouth and back it off two turns, set lock ring.  

Now no matter what, the crimp part of the seat/crimp die doesn't kick in

2 - unscrew seater most of the way, put bullet on that unprimed case and raise ram again.  When ram at TDC/cam-over, screw in seater until it touches bullet.  Lower ram, screw in seater two or three more turns, and raise ram and then lower.   The bullet should now be minimally seated.  Get out the calipers and measure COAL.  Put case w/ partially seated bullet back on, turn seater screw in one full turn, raise and lower ram, measure again.  The difference between the two measurements is how much a full turn changes the seating depth.  Do some math, twist the seater stem in, raise and measure, rinse and repeat until you have correct length.

Now take that round w/o powder or primer but properly seated bullet and go see if it chambers OK, etc.   Then figure out some way to mark, label, or ID it (super fine sharpie writing on case works) for bullet type etc.  Next time you need to load that bullet to that length, put it in, raise ram to TDC/cam-over, screw seater in until it contacts the bullet and you are done.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By eye-gor:
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:


right???

okay, good to know about the hand primer, i'll watch closely.

can you explain how to make sure the die is set correctly to seat the bullet at a certain depth when changing dies out?


I have both a Lyman and a RCBS hand primer.  Much prefer the Lyman.  FWIW that kit looks very complete, but if price is important you can get very similar by starting with a less complete kit and adding a couple of items...

As far as bullet seating goes.... depends on if you want crimp or no crimp, and if you do want crimp, do you do it as a second pass or as part of seating? I prefer no crimp but when I need/want to I do it as a second pass...

Here's how I set it up with my Hornady dies (some dies may be different, other users certainly could be different...).  With the Hornady seating/crimping die, the die depth in the press (controlled via lock ring position) is what controls the crimp, and the bullet seating stem has a secondary adjustment to control depth.

1 - trimmed to length, resized UNPRIMED case onto the shell holder, raise ram to cam-over/TDC, screw die in until it contacts case mouth and back it off two turns, set lock ring.  

Now no matter what, the crimp part of the seat/crimp die doesn't kick in

2 - unscrew seater most of the way, put bullet on that unprimed case and raise ram again.  When ram at TDC/cam-over, screw in seater until it touches bullet.  Lower ram, screw in seater two or three more turns, and raise ram and then lower.   The bullet should now be minimally seated.  Get out the calipers and measure COAL.  Put case w/ partially seated bullet back on, turn seater screw in one full turn, raise and lower ram, measure again.  The difference between the two measurements is how much a full turn changes the seating depth.  Do some math, twist the seater stem in, raise and measure, rinse and repeat until you have correct length.

Now take that round w/o powder or primer but properly seated bullet and go see if it chambers OK, etc.   Then figure out some way to mark, label, or ID it (super fine sharpie writing on case works) for bullet type etc.  Next time you need to load that bullet to that length, put it in, raise ram to TDC/cam-over, screw seater in until it contacts the bullet and you are done.



i looked around and couldn't find everything in that kit cheaper if done piecemeal. am i looking in the wrong place?
Link Posted: 1/13/2023 1:11:26 AM EST
[#21]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By rrbgeb:



Looks like a solid foundation.  The rebel takes priming off the press and is supposedly an upgrade over the rockchucker.  

The plus kit with powder stand and a few other goodies might be a good option.
View Quote


what's this thing you speak of? i'm a nooooob i googled but i don't follow.
Link Posted: 1/13/2023 6:43:37 AM EST
[#22]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:


i looked around and couldn't find everything in that kit cheaper if done piecemeal. am i looking in the wrong place?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:


i looked around and couldn't find everything in that kit cheaper if done piecemeal. am i looking in the wrong place?


The plus kit with powder stand and a few other goodies might be a good option.


If you look at the pic of the kit you pointed to, you'll see the powder measure is attached to an arm that is held in place by the lock ring on the die on top of the press.

You probably want a stand-alone measure, either with a clamp mount to fit on a shelf or on some other type of mount.  Otherwise, each time you change dies you'll have to deal with your powder measure ... becomes a PITA.


I like midsouth, so that is where I started.

Partner press kit - $189, just like the kit you pointed to but missing powder measure, powder trickler, and priming tool.  Those can be added for about $90 total...

Attachment Attached File



Link Posted: 1/13/2023 8:48:51 AM EST
[#23]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:


what's this thing you speak of? i'm a nooooob i googled but i don't follow.
View Quote


Link

This one, few more things included like a stand for the powder measure, bullet puller, etc.
Link Posted: 1/13/2023 9:07:30 AM EST
[#24]
Just buy the kit.

Then find room in your place to set it up.

Read the book I linked in my post above.

You gotta do some hands-on to get the hang of it.
Link Posted: 1/13/2023 9:16:28 AM EST
[#25]
For a couple of rifle cartridges I would try and start with a Redding turret.  So you can keep it set up w/o changing dies.


Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 1/15/2023 1:28:07 AM EST
[#26]
eh, went with the rcbs rebel master kit. got a deal for 310 after promo discount on grabagun, so for the quality of the parts that matter, i couldn't find anything close. so that should get me started when i'm ready to.

also already have calipers and a tumbler, as it happens.

so, how necessary is a case trimmer?
Link Posted: 1/15/2023 7:32:15 AM EST
[#27]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:

so, how necessary is a case trimmer?
View Quote


Kinda depends, but I'd say "very - eventually"

I've had brass stretch to beyond max length on the first reloading, and I've had some that went several loadings before exceeding the max length...  If you have enough brass, you can load once or twice and when too long just toss it...

Personally if you are going to end up going for precision, the key is consistency so you'll want your brass trimmed to same length, etc.
Link Posted: 1/15/2023 8:36:09 AM EST
[#28]
Has OP told us what caliber he is loading?

No need for case trimmer for straight wall cartridges.

Essential for bottleneck.
Link Posted: 1/15/2023 10:30:10 AM EST
[#29]
308 and 300 norma mag is the intention for reloading. 9mm might happen just cuz.
Link Posted: 1/15/2023 1:11:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: W_E_G] [#30]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shinobi15:
308 and 300 norma mag is the intention for reloading. 9mm might happen just cuz.
View Quote


Get CASE GAGES. Especially if ammo will be used in semiauto.

If shooting bolt gun, consider neck-sizing only. Case gage useful, but not essential if neck sizing ammo to be used in just one rifle.
Link Posted: 2/5/2023 8:24:47 PM EST
[#31]
Kits aren't bad. I just posted on the reloading section of the armory regarding hands primers.

Bolt or semi auto I FL size but use a bushing die for bolt guns. You're going to have to full length size at some point even when neck sizing.

Get gauges. Comparator or case depth micrometer will come in handy to bump the shoulders back on a semi or bolt gun. Hornady is most often mentioned/shown but I personally like and have the Wilson.

trimmers are a whole subject on their own.

Loading is awesome, but just like the firearms we load for it can end up costing
Link Posted: 2/6/2023 3:21:29 PM EST
[#32]
First off,  is this for precision reloading or just saving money over store bought ammo...

It makes a difference in the equipment you need versus want.....So if you are going to do precision, lets start with the 300norma and dies..For precision work you will likely want to buy competition dies, including a sleeved seating die, and a bushing neck sizing die... Redding/Forrester , the best for normal dies/presses, or Wilson if you want to go arbor press instead of reloading press...So if you go with a sleeved seating die, using the best long range heavy for caliper bullets, you may need a taller press throat then standard on most presses..I highly recommend the RCBS summit press or the Forrester single stage press..You can reload on a progressive, but you may limit what you can do such as sleeved seaters due to the lack of room available...Next, you will want to uniform primer pockets, so you need a uniformer for your primer sizes...Next you need to trim your brass to length after sizing, the most accurate trimmers gauge off the case head , the fastest trimmers gauge off the shoulder, so your trim lengths are only as good as your sizing die ability is...For a lathe style trimmer RCBS makes both a powered and a manual trimmer, the manual you can buy a cheap bit for and run it off a drill, Wilson makes what many believe is the best lathe type trimmer, I don't know I use a powered RCBS trimmer and if its inaccurate, its because of me, not the machine..I use RCBS 3 way trimmer for trimming, it trims to length and chamfers both the inside and outside at one shot, making for extremely consistent trims and making the whole process a once and done thing instead of trimming, chamfer outer, chamfer inner  3 stage process most others have...For precision ammo, you will likely want to anneal brass after every firing, weather you use a torch and some tempilac or you by a top of the line annealer like AMP...So that gets your brass mostly done, just needs cleaned, I use a FART(Franklin Armory rotary tumbler) that uses water, chemicals, and stainless pins to clean brass like new inside and out, or you can do a dry tumbler and they will look good on the outside but still will look like used ammo...

 So for powder handling, most will say a beam scale and a powder measure..Since most rifle ammo in precision uses flake type powders, I would go electronic..RCBS charge master lite is affordable and does quite a good job, a beam scale can give you a simple checker to make sure your charges stay consistent..Best of the best is one of the science grade scales that work with a electronic trickler for all out best of best, but you can spend big money getting the top ones...
You can use your press to install primers or do a hand primer, I do hand with RCBS universal hand primer... Finally there is a pile of measuring tools, a good micrometer, hornadays comparator kit for both checking shoulder length and for bullet ogive, toy may want a primer pocket checker, you may want concentricity gauge all though you can live without that for now, you may want  an inertia bullet puller and or a collet puller, you may want an individual deprimer die. So thats a beginning, if you look at this thread, it will give you a basic for these tools and processes, by no means the only way, simply a way to produce good ammo that works, but it will give you the how/why/when on some of the process...and most of the tools...

https://www.ar15.com/forums/Precision-Rifles/My-long-range-reloading-process-/10-8957/
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