Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
7/8/2020 3:01:36 PM
Posted: 4/6/2016 5:23:10 PM EDT
I was thinking of using wood shavings in my garden. I know I've heard walnut is not good to use. But I have pine, butternut, cedar, aspen, maple and cherry too. Would any of these be a bad choice. Looking to just control weeds and help with holding in moisture.
Link Posted: 4/6/2016 6:10:57 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/7/2016 3:43:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2016 3:45:44 PM EDT by SteelonSteel]
I'm leaning toward it's a bad idea.   Good place for molds and mildew.  

I compost the pine shavings out of the chicken coop but they don't go in the garden for a few years.  They get mixed with garbage scraps from the house and turned over periodically.


ETA- IIRC they bind up N for a few years until they rot.
Link Posted: 4/7/2016 3:55:51 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/8/2016 7:59:30 AM EDT
I would use straw.  Find a local farmer and he will,probably sell them to you $3 per bale.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/8/2016 8:00:19 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:


ETA- IIRC they bind up N for a few years until they rot.
View Quote




Correct.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/8/2016 9:54:43 AM EDT
I pile up wood chips of all varieties 8 to 10 inches deep mostly pine and ceder and in less than a year it becomes the most fertile part of the garden.
Google permaculture.
Link Posted: 4/8/2016 12:06:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/8/2016 2:20:17 PM EDT
We have been leaving chips in a pile for a year or two before use.  The first year the piles can get pretty warm as part of decomposition.  After that, they get used as general mulch around flower beds, etc.

Nick
Link Posted: 4/9/2016 11:15:15 PM EDT
I wouldn't. It will tie up major amounts of nitrogen decomposing, Assuming it's a proper wood to begin with, compost it first.
Link Posted: 4/9/2016 11:29:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/10/2016 12:45:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/10/2016 1:04:36 PM EDT by Kitties-with-Sigs]
Link Posted: 4/10/2016 12:53:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/10/2016 12:55:28 PM EDT by Kitties-with-Sigs]
Link Posted: 4/10/2016 12:58:48 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:


Here's the thing.  I understand why you think that.  You live in Arizona.  

It's different here.  We get 60" of rainfall per year.  NOTHING just sits on top of the soil.

If you put it on the soil, it immediately begins interacting, because of the moisture in the soil and in the air.   Anywhere but the desert, that wood will deplete the nitrogen in the soil.  How fast it happens depends on the level of moisture in soil and air.   You can lay a treated wood plank on the ground here, and in a few years, it will be gone.  An untreated plank will be rotten in two years.  In four it will be gone.

Those wood chips do not behave the same way in Georgia as they do in Arizona.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Originally Posted By Corporal_Chaos:
Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
I'm leaning toward it's a bad idea.   Good place for molds and mildew.  

I compost the pine shavings out of the chicken coop but they don't go in the garden for a few years.  They get mixed with garbage scraps from the house and turned over periodically.


ETA- IIRC they bind up N for a few years until they rot.


Only when mixed in with the soil.  On top of the soil it's not a concern.  

Fungus will help the wood chips break down and are a net beneficial organism.


Here's the thing.  I understand why you think that.  You live in Arizona.  

It's different here.  We get 60" of rainfall per year.  NOTHING just sits on top of the soil.

If you put it on the soil, it immediately begins interacting, because of the moisture in the soil and in the air.   Anywhere but the desert, that wood will deplete the nitrogen in the soil.  How fast it happens depends on the level of moisture in soil and air.   You can lay a treated wood plank on the ground here, and in a few years, it will be gone.  An untreated plank will be rotten in two years.  In four it will be gone.

Those wood chips do not behave the same way in Georgia as they do in Arizona.


I have areas that I water the crap out of there is no difference.

Link Posted: 4/10/2016 1:04:16 PM EDT
I appreciate all the thoughts on this. I guess I'll stick to weeding as needed during the season. It's not a very big area anyway. Glad I asked
Link Posted: 4/10/2016 1:05:22 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/10/2016 1:12:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/12/2016 1:32:48 PM EDT
I use alfalfa as mulch in my no till garden and have bee using it for about 5 years now. As it breaks down it will add about 4% N to your soil. I try and always keep 6 inches down. I will be spreading out 2 bales tonight in my garden as I just put my tomatoes in a few weeks back and it's time to top of my mulch. I pull zero weeds in my garden and its holds moisture in great if you keep 6-8 inches down.
Link Posted: 4/12/2016 1:57:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/12/2016 2:08:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/12/2016 2:11:00 PM EDT by Kitties-with-Sigs]
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 11:18:51 PM EDT
Sorry for the late reply I just back in from a much needed vacation to Maui. As far as me mulching with alfalfa and weeds. I put down 2 bales a year in my garden, it's amazing that it gets broken down so fast. Anyways as long as I have 6 inches down I have zero weed issues, I can't even remember the last time I had to pull a weed.  The one time I did have some issues I let it get thin in an area that I walked on alot and I had some weeds poke through but they got killed quick and mulched over.
Top Top