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Posted: 9/17/2009 4:31:06 AM EST
did a search, didn't find much.

Online resources suggest "one" 500cc packet per 5 gal bucket, ARCOM wizards suggest doubling up each back to ensure proper utilization.

These will likely be stored (long grain white rice) for years before I feed them to my kids in the following condition:

single large mylar bag (sealed) inside a home depot bucket and rubber-gasket lid, in a cool basement. Expectation of 5 years.

Suggestions? I have 500cc and 100cc 02 absorbers I havne't opened yet - going to do 4-5 buckets at a time. I was planning on one 500cc per bucket and then checking for "vacuum" so to speak after a few days, before sealing the buckets.

Link Posted: 9/17/2009 4:49:05 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 4:50:59 AM EST by bmw20]
I believe the general consensus is 1500cc of o2 absorbers for 5 gallon buckets (I could be wrong). There is a website that shows how many cc's per type of bag/bucket (I'll see If I can find it if someone else doesn't post a link). Also, If you seal the bags well with the proper amount of o2 absorbers - you can quadruple that 5 year anticipated shelf life.

ETA - http://www.sorbentsystems.com/o2absorbers_1.html
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 5:47:40 AM EST
I toss in a small hand warmer, it pulls a good vacuum, pulling the lid down concave.
With a couple of these, you could do a 55 gallon drum if you wanted to.

Hand warmers go on sale at Wally-world in the spring.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 7:55:10 AM EST
ETA: The answer is....

2 500cc packets

from the above link, their example was exactly what I was looking for (thanks!). They calculated that a 5 gal bucket of rice would need less than 700cc of O2 absorption... so 2 500cc'ers will be more than enough.

Example:
We want to know what size oxygen absorber to use for a 5 gallon bucket of rice.

1. We determine from the table above that there are 18,942 cubic centimeters in a 5 gallon plastic bucket.

2. The rice weighs 35 pounds which converts to 15,876 grams.

3. 18,942 (cc) container volume - 15,876 (g) rice = 3,066 cc residual air volume.

4. 3,066 (cc) residual air volume x .205 (oxygen fraction in air) = 628.53 cc oxygen volume

5. Since the size of oxygen absorbers are rated and named according to the amount of oxygen they absorb, we know that a 750 cc oxygen absorber will be sufficient for this bucket of rice
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 8:06:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2009 8:08:34 AM EST by SigOwner_P229]
Originally Posted By fundummy:
I toss in a small hand warmer, it pulls a good vacuum, pulling the lid down concave.
With a couple of these, you could do a 55 gallon drum if you wanted to.

Hand warmers go on sale at Wally-world in the spring.


Ok, so handwarmers work on (absorb) oxygen, I get that. But are these a commonly acceptable substitute for O2 absorbers?

I'm just wondering because that seems like a pretty cheap source of O2 absorbers if you can find them on sale.

Any negative effects from the "burst" of localized heat that is trapped inside a bag that reflects the radiation back in? There is basically no convection or radiation to get rid of heat which are the 2 major heat dissipators in this situation; and rice/grain is a pretty decent insulator so very little conduction.
Link Posted: 9/17/2009 11:24:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By fundummy:
I toss in a small hand warmer, it pulls a good vacuum, pulling the lid down concave.
With a couple of these, you could do a 55 gallon drum if you wanted to.

Hand warmers go on sale at Wally-world in the spring.


Ok, so handwarmers work on (absorb) oxygen, I get that. But are these a commonly acceptable substitute for O2 absorbers?

I'm just wondering because that seems like a pretty cheap source of O2 absorbers if you can find them on sale.

Any negative effects from the "burst" of localized heat that is trapped inside a bag that reflects the radiation back in? There is basically no convection or radiation to get rid of heat which are the 2 major heat dissipators in this situation; and rice/grain is a pretty decent insulator so very little conduction.


They don't get hot... they only get warm while it absorbs the oxygen, and should not affect the grain.
From what I understand, the 02 absorbers and the hand warmers are made of powdered iron and salt.

A reminder about 02 absorbers, if the packet is " stiff " ( not flexible with loose material inside )... it's probably shot.
I store them in an air tight jar.

There's more on this kind of stuff all the time, come on over to the survival forum -> http://www.ar15.com/forums/forum.html?b=10&f=17
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