Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 3/24/2009 12:19:28 PM EDT
hey everyone,

I caught a cottontail at work today and while i was cleaning him, i noticed some of his innerds were moving around. I didnt open up the intestines, but i assume there was a tapeworm of some sort in there. i checked the meat out and i didnt see anything at all out of the ordinary.

is there any chance that it would have worms that might get me sick inside of the muscles or do they usually just hang out in the digestive system.

i really hate to waste any meat especially something that i got myself.

thanks for any input.
Link Posted: 3/24/2009 7:26:42 PM EDT
Cook well and cook hot.
Link Posted: 3/24/2009 8:15:43 PM EDT
hey thanks rizzo, will do!

i really hate wasting meat, but i hate getting sick more.
Link Posted: 3/24/2009 10:09:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/24/2009 10:10:13 PM EDT by rizzo1318]
Hey smokie, I admire your wildlife conservative outlook - I too, avoid wasting meat where I can, and like to try and eat everything I kill. That being said, I steer clear of just about any meat that looks questionable, because there are a lot of bad diseases in some animals out here in the West and intestinal worms do not sound appealing to me.

This time of year is very "iffy" for eating rabbits - once the first of the year rolls around, I usually just leave 'em lay until after the first freeze. I don't think you're gonna die or anything from this one rabbit, so the decision is yours to make.

BTW, I killed a jackrabbit last fall that had worms really bad - and because I am who I am, I took a pic. Doesn't really do it justice since you can't see them squirming around, but you get the idea. Check out all the white stringy worms:

Link Posted: 3/25/2009 3:31:07 AM EDT
yeah my dad always taught me to not ever waste any meat that i take, unless, like you say, its just not edible or doesnt look or smell right.

if i had seen those worms in one of my rabbits, i probably wouldnt have eaten it.

btw, i really enjoy looking at all the pics of yotes and cats that you get. that is amazing, it must be full of them out by you!
Link Posted: 3/25/2009 6:09:11 AM EDT
Arizona is a great place for so many types of hunting, but your home there in Texas has some awesome opportunities, especially for predators - you can even night hunt!

I was just re-reading your original post, and I saw something I missed the first time. If his guts were 'moving around', kind of quivering, well that's pretty normal if you just killed the rabbit and then cut him open. All the organ muscles are still contracting, nerves are still firing - I mean, I've seen dead animals twitch for a solid 5 minutes after their brain is dead. A few years ago I was skinning a squirrel and I had him cut open, half his hide off and then one of his front legs just clenched up really tight and then released - and he'd been dead a solid 3 minutes.
Link Posted: 3/25/2009 6:43:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rizzo1318:
Arizona is a great place for so many types of hunting, but your home there in Texas has some awesome opportunities, especially for predators - you can even night hunt!

I was just re-reading your original post, and I saw something I missed the first time. If his guts were 'moving around', kind of quivering, well that's pretty normal if you just killed the rabbit and then cut him open. All the organ muscles are still contracting, nerves are still firing - I mean, I've seen dead animals twitch for a solid 5 minutes after their brain is dead. A few years ago I was skinning a squirrel and I had him cut open, half his hide off and then one of his front legs just clenched up really tight and then released - and he'd been dead a solid 3 minutes.


+1

I have never really been a proponent of the 'first freeze' rule for rabbits. I kill them when I want to eat them. If the meat appears edible (not full of cancerous looking spots/worms/diseased) I simply cook well and eat. Boiling meat will kill ANY internal parasites. Organisms that can survive in flesh prefer temps between 80 and 120 degrees. Anything outside of that range will almost always kill the organism.

Boiling guarantees the death of the parasites. Freezing ... maybe, maybe not. If you are suspicious, boil it. Not grilled or fried.

If you prefer fried meat, and you are suspicious of the parasties, boil it first. Remove it from the bones, carefully, then season, batter and fry.

Any meat that might be close to suspect, I toss.

TRG
Link Posted: 3/25/2009 9:21:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rizzo1318:
Arizona is a great place for so many types of hunting, but your home there in Texas has some awesome opportunities, especially for predators - you can even night hunt!

I was just re-reading your original post, and I saw something I missed the first time. If his guts were 'moving around', kind of quivering, well that's pretty normal if you just killed the rabbit and then cut him open. All the organ muscles are still contracting, nerves are still firing - I mean, I've seen dead animals twitch for a solid 5 minutes after their brain is dead. A few years ago I was skinning a squirrel and I had him cut open, half his hide off and then one of his front legs just clenched up really tight and then released - and he'd been dead a solid 3 minutes.


yeah ive had plenty of times when i get to clean some small game as soon as i take it and noticed the muscles twitching and contracting. hell growing up in southeast lousiana, i used to get a kick out of the fresh frog legs when you throw them in the frying pan.

my first guess was that it was maybe just the gas inside of the intestines causing them to move around but when i was watching them, they started to move back and forth, even standing up out of the pile sometimes. some sort of worm was definitely in there.

hey, at least i can say that is the first wild rabbit that i caught with my bare hands without a trap!

I do need to get my own property so i can start hunting more often. its hard for me to set up a hunt with my schedule.

TRG...ill definitely have to try what you said as far as cooking them, sounds good!

Link Posted: 3/28/2009 12:44:58 AM EDT
The only parasites which bother me are protozans. Yes, skin burrowing warbles are nasty but they are larvae. Roundworms ARE communicable but as long as you don't gut shoot or contact feces, all is fine. Nearly all dove/quail/turkey have them too.

Protozoans can infect blood
Top Top