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Posted: 8/20/2014 7:20:55 PM EST
Which would you rather have shtf and why?

I've made several diy alcohol stoves that seem to work fine and are lightweight. The jetboil kits seem nice and I like how they nestle together and seem packable. What do you guys prefer or do you use a different method altogether?
Link Posted: 8/20/2014 7:24:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/20/2014 7:25:31 PM EST by PhulesAu]
SHTF? Alcohol stove, lots of fuel choices. AND you can replicate with relative ease. very light and about as KISS as it gets.
Link Posted: 8/20/2014 7:36:56 PM EST
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Originally Posted By PhulesAu:
SHTF? Alcohol stove, lots of fuel choices. AND you can replicate with relative ease. very light and about as KISS as it gets.
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I agree, they are simple and they just work.
If not shtf would your choice be different?
Link Posted: 8/20/2014 8:28:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/20/2014 8:32:17 PM EST by rmcgee]
SHTF you could always just make alcohol stoves on the fly. I like my multi fuel whisperlite international for actual cooking so that'd be my choice.

A few backpacking buds have the jetboils and about the only big advantage I see is they boil water lighting fast (if thats an advantage) I like being able to throw any ole pot or pan on my stove and cook up some chicken breast or just make a cup or pot of coffee

I like flexibility and the international offers just that.
Link Posted: 8/20/2014 8:36:35 PM EST
I have a jetboil....they are awesome! They can boil water in a matter of seconds. BUT.....all you can do is boil water in them, if you want to heat up sauce, food, or anything else that is not a thin liquid....forget it.
Link Posted: 8/20/2014 8:54:10 PM EST
There is one problem with homemade alcohol stoves: putting them out. They work by getting very hot and then burning not the liquid alcohol but the vaporized gases. The problem is that it can be difficult to put out. I made a few mostly for fun but I did take one backpacking. I made a cover out of another can. I used foil tape and made sure that it would seal around the stove. The problem is that unless you put it on just right gases will escape from around the cover and continue to burn. Since the stove is still hot, it will continue to produce these vaporized gases. The flames will quickly make the lid too hot to handle. So now you have an fire that you cannot put out. With a little practice I could put the fire out almost every time. But the first time I used it on a backpacking trip, I had this problem. I used a couple sticks to remove the lid and got the fire out on the second try. I own a jet boil now.
Link Posted: 8/20/2014 9:06:35 PM EST
In a SHTF scenario, how are you going to re-supply either alcohol or isobutane fuel? Consider two failsafe alternatives --- the venerable Kelly Kettle, fueled by almost anything inflammable and hell-on-wheels for boiling water, albeit big and bulky, or, the Solo Stove (with pot it nests in) fueled by sticks and cones and other "biomass", and also accommodates use with an alcohol burner. Either implement works well with twigs and scraps of wood, dried dung, or other easily scrounged no-tech fuel. Size matters, so opt for the larger capacity versions of the Kelly Kettle, or the "Titan" Solo Stove. For general purpose campfire cooking, see also Purcell Trench Grills --- offering lightweight, compact, grills and accessories for cooking over open fires. None of these are cheap, all are bargains.
Link Posted: 8/20/2014 9:20:33 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/20/2014 9:27:47 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By imq707s:
I have a jetboil....they are awesome! They can boil water in a matter of seconds. BUT.....all you can do is boil water in them, if you want to heat up sauce, food, or anything else that is not a thin liquid....forget it.
View Quote


This is an inaccurate assertion --- my JetBoil stoves have a fuel valve "throttle", which is one of their selling points, and a distinguishing feature, compared to other "blow torch only" stoves. It is finicky to dial down the burn rate, but it's easily done, and easiest using JetBoil's proprietary pots and pans with their "Flux Ring" feature, but do-able with conventional utensils,using the JetBoil pot support accessory. The JetBoil stoves are marvels of efficiency and smart design, but still, not ideal choices for SHTF.
Link Posted: 8/20/2014 9:42:00 PM EST
There are several stoves that use twigs and etc to cook with...
Link Posted: 8/21/2014 3:21:23 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 161Infantry:
There are several stoves that use twigs and etc to cook with...
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Emberlit
Link Posted: 8/21/2014 8:43:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2014 8:57:24 AM EST by rmcgee]
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Originally Posted By 161Infantry:
There are several stoves that use twigs and etc to cook with...
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Four dog stove bush cooker is a multi fuel stove that uses wood
Link Posted: 8/21/2014 9:49:24 AM EST
For FIVE BUCKS shipped you can do both and not break your bank. DannerTrax
Link Posted: 8/21/2014 10:51:38 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DannerTrax:
For FIVE BUCKS shipped you can do both and not break your bank. DannerTrax
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41pqcNyohqL._SY355_.jpg
View Quote


This was my first compact stove and it was fantastic for the price! I did a head to head with a pocket rocket and snow peak and it held its own with the rocket and was actually better then the snow peak at boil times. Only bad thing was a breeze would affect the flame more then the other two.

Only reason I gave it away was to go liquid fuel.
Link Posted: 8/21/2014 12:19:00 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DannerTrax:
For FIVE BUCKS shipped you can do both and not break your bank. DannerTrax
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41pqcNyohqL._SY355_.jpg
View Quote



I was really considering that one. Would be great for truck bag or a cache too.may grab one or two.
Link Posted: 8/21/2014 3:46:09 PM EST
The MSR Whisperlite is about as bombproof as they get. Field strippable and the international version will burn just about any fuel. I have had mine for decades.
Link Posted: 8/21/2014 6:47:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2014 6:48:20 PM EST by Spydermonkey]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By rmcgee:


This was my first compact stove and it was fantastic for the price! I did a head to head with a pocket rocket and snow peak and it held its own with the rocket and was actually better then the snow peak at boil times. Only bad thing was a breeze would affect the flame more then the other two.

Only reason I gave it away was to go liquid fuel.
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View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By rmcgee:
Originally Posted By DannerTrax:
For FIVE BUCKS shipped you can do both and not break your bank. DannerTrax
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41pqcNyohqL._SY355_.jpg


This was my first compact stove and it was fantastic for the price! I did a head to head with a pocket rocket and snow peak and it held its own with the rocket and was actually better then the snow peak at boil times. Only bad thing was a breeze would affect the flame more then the other two.

Only reason I gave it away was to go liquid fuel.
One of these will solve that problem


Link Posted: 8/22/2014 5:07:05 AM EST
For SHTF? Meaning I will not be able to rely on being able to find fuel cannisters for my jetboil?

I'll take one of these in that case..

http://www.bushcraft-essentials.com/english/outdoor-stoves/bushbox-xl-multi-fuel-outdoor-stove.html


Link Posted: 8/22/2014 10:48:15 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By glocke12:
For SHTF? Meaning I will not be able to rely on being able to find fuel cannisters for my jetboil?

I'll take one of these in that case..

http://www.bushcraft-essentials.com/english/outdoor-stoves/bushbox-xl-multi-fuel-outdoor-stove.html


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61L26YKlpVL._SL1500_.jpg
View Quote


Thanks! I've been looking for the right wood burning stove that will also work well with my trangia and this looks perfect
Link Posted: 8/22/2014 2:39:41 PM EST
Whisperlite International. It will burn just about any flammable liquid.

Only thing that would come close for SHTF would be this:

BioLite

Actually I think any one preparing for SHTF should have both of them.
Link Posted: 8/22/2014 5:16:27 PM EST
For SHTF I wouldn't choose a canister stove like the Jetboil. It's a great stove for boiling water for dehydrated meals, but it has a somewhat limited running time; depending on the size of the fuel canister. It's great for backpacking or camping, but I think it's limited by the single fuel source. I love mine for what it is; but it's not a great prolonged SHTF stove

My SHTF stove is the Primus Omnifuel. It burns everything but alcohol; unleaded, kero, diesel, white gas, liquid paraffin, canisters, propane. I purchased a 1lb propane adapter off of Ebay so I can also run those bottles too. The pump is mostly metal, so fewer breakages. I'm sacrificing weight for reliability, but I'm ok with that.

My backup to that is going to be an Emberlit Fire Ant; a lightweight titanium wood and biomass stove. They're currently in production and should be out shortly.
Link Posted: 8/22/2014 7:33:49 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By rmcgee:


Thanks! I've been looking for the right wood burning stove that will also work well with my trangia and this looks perfect
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By rmcgee:
Originally Posted By glocke12:
For SHTF? Meaning I will not be able to rely on being able to find fuel cannisters for my jetboil?

I'll take one of these in that case..

http://www.bushcraft-essentials.com/english/outdoor-stoves/bushbox-xl-multi-fuel-outdoor-stove.html


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61L26YKlpVL._SL1500_.jpg


Thanks! I've been looking for the right wood burning stove that will also work well with my trangia and this looks perfect


I ordered one off amazon, and will be using it this weekend for the first time. over on Bushcraft USA a couple of the guys have them and they are highly regarded.
Link Posted: 8/22/2014 9:09:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/22/2014 9:11:42 PM EST by DannerTrax]
For SHTF I would use fire, wood, pan, and rocks. DannerTrax
Link Posted: 8/23/2014 4:14:17 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DannerTrax:
For SHTF I would use fire, wood, pan, and rocks. DannerTrax
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This. Stoves are meant to make backpacking easier. If you're in the desert during SHTF, well you've already made poor decisions so your stove choice won't matter.
Link Posted: 8/25/2014 9:38:46 AM EST
for SHTF: Pawnee Fire hole.

otherwise, Jetboil.
Link Posted: 8/25/2014 6:46:12 PM EST
I suppose it depends on what shape Something Hitting The Fan takes:

I've got the old JetBoil PCS 1L system. With the issue 1L heat xchanger pot it works awsome for heating water and thin soupy type things. It came with an adaptor which sits on top of the burner assy and allows one to use any old pot, in addition to the original specialty pot. Mine works great. I like it. It's heavy.

My alcohol ventures have taken the form of the Trangia 25 and a homemade Caldera Cone. The T25 cooks very nicely, if slowly. The temp control w/ simmer ring is great. You can go from barely hot at all to full power, very easily. Simmers excellent. The Caldera Cone is a super nice design, which has lightweight virtues designed to appeal to backpackers. Vehicle campers will be better advised to stick with the sturdy Trangia 25, almost no matter how few or many mouths you have to feed. I like the Trangia. It's really heavy to carry.

If your cooking system needs to sit in a ragingly hot and then cold vehicle year round, then alcohol is the answer. The mixed butane/propane cans won't take the elevated temps seen by many parked cars (130F Max?). Alcohol will tend to evaporate and escape, but that's it. Plus there's no moving parts w/ an alcohol stove.

I like 'em both. It depends.
Link Posted: 8/26/2014 9:01:26 AM EST
im heavily considering the biolite.
I live in eastern Kentucky, its mostly woods here and there is plenty of wood or scrap wood to burn.
it seems very efficient.
I like the idea you could charge a battery bank with it as well.

natural disasters we deal with here are flooding and power outages. It never floods here at my home but sometimes the power is out. It can range from an hour to 2 weeks locally. (its never been off here longer than 4-5 hours)
so i think something like this could be beneficial.
Link Posted: 8/26/2014 8:48:20 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Bend:
Silverfire Scout
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I prefer the solo stove for wood gasifier stoves.
Link Posted: 9/8/2014 5:18:31 PM EST
I made a cat food can alcohol stove and it works slick as hell. That being said I also have a Jetboil. For SHTF I would take both!

The Jetboil boils water. Fast, simple, and that's it.

The alcohol stove does great for a fry pan.
Link Posted: 9/9/2014 9:19:25 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gks452:
There is one problem with homemade alcohol stoves: putting them out. They work by getting very hot and then burning not the liquid alcohol but the vaporized gases. The problem is that it can be difficult to put out. I made a few mostly for fun but I did take one backpacking. I made a cover out of another can. I used foil tape and made sure that it would seal around the stove. The problem is that unless you put it on just right gases will escape from around the cover and continue to burn. Since the stove is still hot, it will continue to produce these vaporized gases. The flames will quickly make the lid too hot to handle. So now you have an fire that you cannot put out. With a little practice I could put the fire out almost every time. But the first time I used it on a backpacking trip, I had this problem. I used a couple sticks to remove the lid and got the fire out on the second try. I own a jet boil now.
View Quote
I have never once had a problem putting one out.

Find and read the cat-stove document and make a proper cover.
Link Posted: 9/11/2014 6:24:30 AM EST
I have a few alcohol stove, the Trangia is the heaviest but still very effective if used properly. I really think alcohol fuel would be more available for long term SHTF; plenty of distilleries would pop up vice gas refineries. If done right, you can pretty much calculate your fuel use to boil a measure amount of water. I usually need a single ounce of fuel to boil enough water for a meal, drink and a little left over for clean up.

Still, a compact wood stove is a good choice (which I couple with a small alcohol stove). Using a compact wood stove gives you a quick base to make and sustain a small cooking stove which is much more efficient than a ground fire. Digging a Dakota pit is effective, but very time consuming. The gasification stoves are even more efficient (Bushbuddy, Solo stove) and once started will have little to no smoke signature; all these can boil water with just a couple handfuls of twigs, wood chips, bark, etc. More importantly, these are excellent Leave-No-Trace stoves as they completely burn to ash which can be dispersed with very little signature and no burned-ground fire ring. My Bushbuddy with alcohol stove is only 6.6 ounces (of course you need to pack some alcohol fuel):



Another option in a more compact package than the Kelly-Kettle, is the Boilerwerks Backcountry Boiler. It works just like the Kelly-Kettle in a minimalist size; not as much water boiled, but enough for a freeze-dried/instant meal and hot beverage. The nice thing about these is that once you boil/purify water, you can let it cool, cork it and pack it like a canteen.





Adding a small alcohol stove gives you the ability to boil up water with almost no signature and they are almost entirely quiet.

I’m awaiting the delivery of the new Emberlit Fireant for use with a Trangia stove; this looks like a pretty good duo for bugging home or long day-hikes.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 9/18/2014 10:40:00 AM EST
The trick to alcohol is not putting them out it's useing an economical amount of fuel to do the job and let it burn out shortly after.
Link Posted: 9/27/2014 1:05:35 AM EST
found an "older' jetboil at the thrift store today.. paid $4
everything was there.. not bad, considering they're about $75 new.

couldn't resist at that price.. I have a plethora of other types of stoves

canister, alcohol and multifuel...oh, and even a propane colman 2 burner

I'm pretty much ready for anything stove related
Link Posted: 9/27/2014 7:24:56 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By VaFish:
Whisperlite International. It will burn just about any flammable liquid.

Only thing that would come close for SHTF would be this:

BioLite

Actually I think any one preparing for SHTF should have both of them.
View Quote

One of my camping buddies has one of these and it's neat, but keeping it going is a PITA. You have to constantly feed it.

I have a Kovea Spider butane stove that I like a lot and a windscreen to go with it. I also recently bought a propane adapter so I can run it off 1lb. propane canisters.

Obviously, for long term SHTF a wood fired stove is hard to beat. But IMHO, for short duration use the butane canister/propane stoves are hard to beat for convenience.
Link Posted: 10/3/2014 1:15:19 PM EST
id love to get me a whisperlight, but for now i use a home made alc stove ill post pictures of the cover i made that works pretty well with it. i used it at work last winter after some dental work whre i was on a soup diet for a week, i used it out in the shop to heat up soup. one of my techs thought it was so cool he brought in two fosters beer cans for me to make one out of it works pretty well aswell.
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