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Posted: 9/9/2007 2:26:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2007 2:53:16 PM EST by geish]
I booked a hunt in the summer of '08. I need some advice.

I have acheived some great groups with my 45-70 using a 300gr. Hornady hollow point bullet going at ~1900fps. Is this a good enough load, should I go for a heavier bullet, or faster velocity?

I also have some great groups with my .308 using a 178gr. Hornady A-MAX. I still have not chronoed it, but according to the manual, it should be around 2100+ fps. I don't know if the A-MAX is made only for target or also for hunting.

If these loads are good enough for hog, where should I place my shots for the 45-70 and .308 respectively. I've seen people on the boards shoot for the lungs, and some shoot somewhere on the neck area. I don't know if the shots are dependent on the bullet being used. I also read someone's post saying to go for the head using a .308. What is the easiest shot. I'm thinking the lung area because it's so large. Thanks for your help in advance.

Link Posted: 9/9/2007 2:51:23 PM EST
Either load should work fine.

The easiest and most effective shot is in the neck behind and below the ear. You can take a lung shot and chase them down when you get a hit or you can shoot it in the neck and it will drop right there. I've never had them go anywhere after a neck shot and I'm shooting a lot smaller round than you do.

Have fun on your hunt
Link Posted: 9/15/2007 6:11:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2007 6:43:25 AM EST by FMJshooter]
Everything depends on the terrain. If your in thick shit you may want something lower caliber that points quick and can produce fast follow up shots. If the grass gonna be high or down the time of year your going? Neck/head shots are best for any caliber. If your going for body shots the sweet spot is much smaller then you think. Theres a small area right where the shoulder is that will produce a DRT hog. Theres a link some where in this forum that has actual pictures of the shoulder area. I gut shot a hog with a .308 and had to track him for a about 600 yards till he bled out. Even though his guts where out he still ran for a long ways.

Just my .02

ETA Here it is courtesy of lonegunman. www.texasboars.com/anatomy.html
Link Posted: 9/15/2007 6:39:28 AM EST
I found that they aren't all that tough to kill. Hit my little 200 pounder in the head with a .270 and he dropped like a rock. Barely even a twitch. Now my buddy hit his right up the nostril with a .375 H&H. Can you say overkill!
Link Posted: 9/18/2007 1:45:55 PM EST
That's a 178gr A-MAX right, not 78gr? If yes, both loads are good.

Iron sights or scope? If scope, should be on lowest setting.

Positively know your target AND positively know what is beyond your target.

Shoot within your known accuracy range.

Bring a big cooler to haul the meat.

Pack two boxes of ammo in separate bags, should one bag be lost.

Have fun.

PS I always bring a handgun for backup. So far a 10mm and a 45ACP have been along for dispatching shots.
Link Posted: 10/1/2007 8:16:52 AM EST
Remember to bring a good field dressing kit and extra gloves so that you dont touch the animals blood. Remember that you must be careful when handling a wild animal.
Link Posted: 10/1/2007 2:56:04 PM EST

Originally Posted By chris65:
That's a 178gr A-MAX right, not 78gr? If yes, both loads are good.

Iron sights or scope? If scope, should be on lowest setting.

Positively know your target AND positively know what is beyond your target.

Shoot within your known accuracy range.

Bring a big cooler to haul the meat.

Pack two boxes of ammo in separate bags, should one bag be lost.

Have fun.

PS I always bring a handgun for backup. So far a 10mm and a 45ACP have been along for dispatching shots.


chris, yes I just corrected it; 178 grain A-MAX. I will be using scoped rifles. My cousin and I are going. I'm more adept at handling the 45-70 so he will/might be using the .308. We'll see. As for sidearms/backup, I do have an .45ACP and a .460SWmag just in case.
Thanks for all yall's help.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:23:50 AM EST
height=8
Originally Posted By Muerte:
hat

huh?
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:59:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By lemanster:

Originally Posted By Muerte:
Remember to bring a good field dressing kit and extra gloves so that you dont touch the animals blood. Remember that you must be careful when handling a wild animal.

huh?


+1 never heard of this before.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 11:48:08 AM EST
Feral hogs can carry some nasty viruses and blood born pathogens. Some hunters are very careful when they field dress them-using gloves etc..... Me, I just get a little warm and bloody.
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