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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 10/9/2007 8:30:48 AM EST
I bought one of those electronic calls and have tried 2 times to hunt coyotes using it. but no luck. I had it set on the distressed rabbit call.

any particular tips I need to know about hunting predators and using those calls?

which is better - dawn or dusk?

How far away can a yote/predator hear them?


Link Posted: 10/9/2007 8:35:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/9/2007 8:35:54 AM EST by stretch415]
I went out my first full season last year. We did call some in but they were close range(under 200yds) I think alot of electronic callers(we have a small crappy handheld and larger remote control top of the line one) dont get loud enough to work effectively in the openness of Minnesota and SD. I talked with a kid at sportsmans wearhouse about it(I guess he really knows his stuff) and he recommended a few calls that really scream in the open tundra.

We spotted 6 yotes at 500yds out on a windier day down in a canyon and were unable to get their attention(due to it not being loud enough). I then split up from my party and went and posted up and couldnt even remotely hear it at 250yds away.

So make sure your call is loud enough. I like closed reeds because the open ones buzz my lips so damn bad.

(EDIT) We spotted all of ours in the mornings and could hear them in the evening but never close enough to see.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 1:10:53 PM EST
I call and kill about 60 coyotes a year. They can hear a call from about two miles away and they don't need to be all that loud. In fact I started to kill way more with hand calls then with E-calls. I kill about 80% with a shotgun.

Nevada is full of coyotes and I hunt very open country. My guess is your calling a heavier wooded area so you have probably called in dogs and never saw them.

Sneak in to a clearing or a field from the down wind side call your first series for no more then 45 seconds sit quite for about 5 minutes (make them hunt you) the more you call the quicker they figure out where you are and will use the wind to double check. Try it out you may be surprised how less noise works better.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 6:41:55 PM EST
scent/wind direction I think is the #1 key. Movement on your part is #2. Stay still or use a blind.
Make sure you are using the right call for the local. Find out what is plentyfull the yotes to eat and make that call. I use hand calls, but from what I read the new E-calls are very effective.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 3:57:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By 220ackley:
I call and kill about 60 coyotes a year. They can hear a call from about two miles away and they don't need to be all that loud. In fact I started to kill way more with hand calls then with E-calls. I kill about 80% with a shotgun.

Nevada is full of coyotes and I hunt very open country. My guess is your calling a heavier wooded area so you have probably called in dogs and never saw them.

Sneak in to a clearing or a field from the down wind side call your first series for no more then 45 seconds sit quite for about 5 minutes (make them hunt you) the more you call the quicker they figure out where you are and will use the wind to double check. Try it out you may be surprised how less noise works better.


thanks for the tip. We are new at this so anything helps. Most people stalk them around here using large parties but we dont have the time or manpower to walk around and scout and stalk.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:49:20 AM EST
thanks for the tips. I am hunting a fairly wooded area as opposed to open terrain. we hunt deer on 100 acres of fairly remote wooded terrain. Lots of oaks, acorns, for deer. not much in way of farmland or fields.

Is it safe to assume yotes are most everywhere?

I was calling from a ladder stand about 12 ft off the ground.

I am assuming predators are out there, you just dont see them tromping through the woods and I have not seen any deer hunting so far.

I did not realize they can hear those calls from that far out (2 miles).
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 2:02:01 PM EST
Yes, it's always safe to assume - but your success rate will go way up if you do a little scouting. Remember, you can't call predators if they're not there! Where they are at night, they may not be during the day, and vice-versa.

Predator scouting is easy - and fun. When you're out hiking around, check for tracks and sign in creek beds, game trails, and fencelines. These are areas predators will most often be using. At night, try to locate where they are howling from, or use a siren or your own howler call to locate them - but watch out! They may come in for a closer look, and if it's legal to hunt at night in your area, do so - that's some of the best predator hunting you will do.

Ladder stands or tree stands work well for predators, just place the call on the ground of course! You will come upon predators from time to time when you're just out walking, but most of the time you will not see them. Every now and then, though . . . . last week I was creeping up to a stand location just as the sun was about to set, and caught a coyote laying down in the field about 200 yards ahead. BAM! Dead coyote, didn't even have to call. So it happens, but not often.

Predators will come from a long ways off if they hear your call, so give your stands plenty of time, depending a lot on location and time of year. I have stood up from a stand a few times and seen a coyote or such making haste the other direction - sometimes even after 45 mins of calling. You just never know when they'll come in - which makes calling so exciting!
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 2:52:22 PM EST
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Originally Posted By hicap:
thanks for the tips. I am hunting a fairly wooded area as opposed to open terrain. we hunt deer on 100 acres of fairly remote wooded terrain. Lots of oaks, acorns, for deer. not much in way of farmland or fields.

Is it safe to assume yotes are most everywhere?

I was calling from a ladder stand about 12 ft off the ground.

I am assuming predators are out there, you just dont see them tromping through the woods and I have not seen any deer hunting so far.

I did not realize they can hear those calls from that far out (2 miles).



If your by yourself use a E-calller and leave you speaker on the ground. Start of very low volume. call 45 to 60 seconds take 3-5 minutes off the increase the volume.

when we contest call we do 10 minutes on a stand( the more stands the better your odds) when I call for fun or fur I will spend as much as 45 minutes on a stand. BE PATIENT. I can tell you how many I have killed thinking the area i was in was void of Coyotes. They don't no the rules about calling Coyotes. I have had them run under my truck coming to the call. They have come in stait down wind and never act like the smelled me.
I take guys out all the time that have read every book and watched every DVD on the subject. they tell me every thing we're not supost to do so I will do them to show the Coyotes Do not know these rules. use the wind to your advantage. All ways possion your self to face more down wind If they circle down wind you will be ready but don't be shocked when they don't.
The first one is always the hardest once he/she on the ground it just gets easier and way more fun. Don't over think it KISS works best here like so many other places. Just go have fun. ( The two mile thing is open contry not wooded) If your ever in northern Nevada IM me and I will gladly take you out. That goes for any of you guys. you buy the beer at the end of the day.
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