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Posted: 8/9/2011 3:40:45 AM EDT
City runs out of water

If you have people in your family who don't see a need to prep, maybe this article would be good to show them as to why it would be worthwhile to keep some extra water or food around.

As temperatures soared to the triple-digits for the 37th consecutive day Sunday, city officials made an emergency decision to shut off the town's water supply.

"Right now our water towers have no water in them at all," said Mayor Donald Kile. "According to the weather forecast we got no relief coming. We're believing and we're praying for rain."

In the meantime, Kile said the water supply could remain shut off for days while the towers refill. A combination of high water demand and old pipes caused major ruptures along waterlines and forced the city to resort to emergency procedures, Kile said.

Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:31:14 AM EDT
I have a WaterBOB precisely for this reason...but if you don't fill it before they turn the water off you are screwed.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:40:36 AM EDT
We have a dual hot water heater set up in our house - 2 50 gallon tanks.  We also keep 2 weeks worth of water stored (100 gallons).  Between the heater tanks, the stored water, and the two water BOBs, we have enough drinking water for 6 weeks (4 if we can't get the water BOB filled).
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:42:49 AM EDT
Can't they pump water out of Cedar Creek Reservoir?

They're pumping out of Lake Conroe here in Houston.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:47:15 AM EDT
I store 3000 gallons
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:49:31 AM EDT
I hate cleaning our pool and think pools are a waste of money but it came with the house and one perk is water won't be a big issue for us in a SHTF if we bug in. Our bug out in west texas on the other hand has a pond that is dry as a bone and the creek next to our bol is also dry as a bone. Texas is seriously needing some rain.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:50:40 AM EDT



Originally Posted By coldair:


I store 3000 gallons


I only store about 30 right now, which is far below the standard I wish to achieve.



However, I know where I could go to get water, there are rivers within a 10 minute drive that never run dry, and I have all the proper micronic filtration I need to purify the water.
 
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:50:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By coldair:
I store 3000 gallons


Swimming pool?
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:55:39 AM EDT
Like others I have over 14K gallons in the backyard.  But as drinking & cooking goes I'm extremely light in preps.

Texas better be careful what they wish for...they might get a couple of hurricanes parking over their state & causing other problems.

7mm
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 7:04:09 AM EDT



Originally Posted By Skibane:



Originally Posted By coldair:

I store 3000 gallons




Swimming pool?


we are on a well and I put in a whole house 3000 gpd RO with silver impregnated carbon filters, UV sterilizers and 2 1550 gallon tanks. it takes about 8 hours to go from the low point of storage to full tanks and I can do that with a 10kw generator I have with enough gas in the boat to do that ten to 12 times



last time we were without power for 5.5 days after hurricane Wilma



 
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 7:10:50 AM EDT
Well water for the Win!!!  
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 7:20:40 AM EDT
Originally Posted By coldair:

Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By coldair:
I store 3000 gallons


Swimming pool?

we are on a well and I put in a whole house 3000 gpd RO with silver impregnated carbon filters, UV sterilizers and 2 1550 gallon tanks. it takes about 8 hours to go from the low point of storage to full tanks and I can do that with a 10kw generator I have with enough gas in the boat to do that ten to 12 times

last time we were without power for 5.5 days after hurricane Wilma
 


We're on a 12gpm well here, there is no tank other than the pressure vessel, but I have been considereing something like this.
Run the well to a storage tank and draw the water from the tank (so the tank would always be refreshed).
What is a ballpark figure for your setup if you don't mind me asking?
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 7:39:43 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Desert_AIP:
Originally Posted By coldair:

Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By coldair:
I store 3000 gallons


Swimming pool?

we are on a well and I put in a whole house 3000 gpd RO with silver impregnated carbon filters, UV sterilizers and 2 1550 gallon tanks. it takes about 8 hours to go from the low point of storage to full tanks and I can do that with a 10kw generator I have with enough gas in the boat to do that ten to 12 times

last time we were without power for 5.5 days after hurricane Wilma
 


We're on a 12gpm well here, there is no tank other than the pressure vessel, but I have been considereing something like this.
Run the well to a storage tank and draw the water from the tank (so the tank would always be refreshed).
What is a ballpark figure for your setup if you don't mind me asking?




Wow, I'd like to take a guess.

$7k if new and not in biz, got help from friends, etc...

Link Posted: 8/9/2011 7:49:39 AM EDT
my friend runs the local well supply and I am a contractor so I got the ro for cost around 1200. the silver carbon filter was 800, the uv was 400 the tanks I got from free as a customer had to buy them when they were getting a geothermal well drill on the beach and the slurry had to be contained but they cost about 900 a piece at the farm supply company I have about 4 grand in to it, but we pay no water and sewer bills so it works out pretty cheap. one ro membrane every 18 months for 280.0 and recharge the carbon filters and the filter that neutralizes the ph is another 200 a year
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 7:52:38 AM EDT
that aint the only town doing this. there was a story on the news here in sw ok last night about another town that ran out of water and shut everybody off.

and 37 days of 100?! PLEASE, we are already at 75 days straight, and would have been a lot more, except one day it was only like 98.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:11:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ag04blast:
Well water for the Win!!!  


This, plus we have several windmills that feed water to our stock tanks we could use
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:17:06 AM EDT
I get more anxious over water storage than over food. Water just takes up so much more space.



I keep about 300 gallons just for drinking, cooking etc., and have about 400 gal. in the hot tub for flushing, and in a pinch that could be treated for drinking.



With a little notice, I could add another 200 gals in the Water Bob, and misc. buckets and such.







Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:55:55 AM EDT
We are on a well (as is everyone else in our community) in this small southern New Mexico area with a permanent spring fed creek (year round with water rights attached).  Thinking about purchasing a small fuel driven 'trash pump' for emergencies (if rural electric goes out); can use it as a community resource to fill containers for both us and others if needed.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 10:13:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By coldair:
my friend runs the local well supply and I am a contractor so I got the ro for cost around 1200. the silver carbon filter was 800, the uv was 400 the tanks I got from free as a customer had to buy them when they were getting a geothermal well drill on the beach and the slurry had to be contained but they cost about 900 a piece at the farm supply company I have about 4 grand in to it, but we pay no water and sewer bills so it works out pretty cheap. one ro membrane every 18 months for 280.0 and recharge the carbon filters and the filter that neutralizes the ph is another 200 a year


Coldair - Does this system also neutralize salt from coastal intrusion?
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 10:50:47 AM EDT



Originally Posted By 7mm-08:


Like others I have over 14K gallons in the backyard.  But as drinking & cooking goes I'm extremely light in preps.



Texas better be careful what they wish for...they might get a couple of hurricanes parking over their state & causing other problems.



7mm


If your pool water is maintained, Chlorine level, pH, alkalinity etc,

it is good to drink, cook with etc.



Or, if it isn't good to drink, you probably shouldn't swim in it, either.



YMMV





 
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 11:15:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DS11M:
Originally Posted By ag04blast:
Well water for the Win!!!  


This, plus we have several windmills that feed water to our stock tanks we could use


I should add that I can store a month worth of water likely more, and run my well pump off of a small genny.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 11:46:42 AM EDT
Hmmm, seems there are some advantages to living in a temperate climate where it rains a fair amount.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 11:57:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By coldair:
my friend runs the local well supply and I am a contractor so I got the ro for cost around 1200. the silver carbon filter was 800, the uv was 400 the tanks I got from free as a customer had to buy them when they were getting a geothermal well drill on the beach and the slurry had to be contained but they cost about 900 a piece at the farm supply company I have about 4 grand in to it, but we pay no water and sewer bills so it works out pretty cheap. one ro membrane every 18 months for 280.0 and recharge the carbon filters and the filter that neutralizes the ph is another 200 a year


Thanks for the info.

We don't have anything more than a sediment filter here right now.  
We have really good water quality, the well is about 180' deep.  
I don't know if I'd need a lot of treatment equipment, I don't now.

I was thinking of just tapping the main line to the house and placing a tank in between the well and the house.
My thinking is a small pump pulling from the tank would take less electricity than driving the main pump in the well.
Even a hand pump from a ground level (or just below ground level) tank would work in an emergency.

Are your tanks poly or concrete?  I've been looking at underground septic style tanks in both materials.  I think the poly is probably the better choice.

Link Posted: 8/9/2011 12:05:06 PM EDT
Up here in the outlying areas everybody's on a well.  For which they must acquire permits.  Which means, in times of drought, they can pull the permit and shut down the wells.  Usually based on chronological hierarchy.



It's only happened once in the twenty plus years I've been here, but it did happen.  In fact, our last mayor, who's son in law was a bit time contractor pushed through sufficient developments that we figure we're living about 20-50% above the sustainable water level for the area.



So what happens when you've got a well and the sheriffs show up with a lock and shut it down?
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 12:07:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By darkpaladin1:
City runs out of water

to keep some extra water or AND food around.


As a kid, our town once had a 1-day planned water outage.  When they announced it, the shelves of bottled water in stores were empty within minutes, and I kid you not, within a couple of hours, many of the aisles of FOOD were completely empty, too.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 12:25:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TheOTHERmaninblack:
Up here in the outlying areas everybody's on a well.  For which they must acquire permits.  Which means, in times of drought, they can pull the permit and shut down the wells.  Usually based on chronological hierarchy.

It's only happened once in the twenty plus years I've been here, but it did happen.  In fact, our last mayor, who's son in law was a bit time contractor pushed through sufficient developments that we figure we're living about 20-50% above the sustainable water level for the area.

So what happens when you've got a well and the sheriffs show up with a lock and shut it down?



I am not sure about your wells, but I am not sure just how anyone could shut down my well.  I have a 6 inch pipe in the ground, there is no lock on the top, or any way to fasten one.  There is a pump in it that runs with underground piping to to the house, barns, and outdoor hydrants.  Short of physically pulling the pump, I don't know how they could prevent it from being used.  I could always jury rig up power or a second pump if that was an issue anyways.

I don't have any permit for the well anyways, it has been here for years, and I am actually surprised that rural citizens would be willing to accept this.

Link Posted: 8/9/2011 1:02:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TheOTHERmaninblack:
Up here in the outlying areas everybody's on a well.  For which they must acquire permits.  Which means, in times of drought, they can pull the permit and shut down the wells.  Usually based on chronological hierarchy.

It's only happened once in the twenty plus years I've been here, but it did happen.  In fact, our last mayor, who's son in law was a bit time contractor pushed through sufficient developments that we figure we're living about 20-50% above the sustainable water level for the area.

So what happens when you've got a well and the sheriffs show up with a lock and shut it down?



Bolt cutters.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 2:40:28 PM EDT



Originally Posted By lumper:



Originally Posted By TheOTHERmaninblack:

Up here in the outlying areas everybody's on a well.  For which they must acquire permits.  Which means, in times of drought, they can pull the permit and shut down the wells.  Usually based on chronological hierarchy.



It's only happened once in the twenty plus years I've been here, but it did happen.  In fact, our last mayor, who's son in law was a bit time contractor pushed through sufficient developments that we figure we're living about 20-50% above the sustainable water level for the area.



So what happens when you've got a well and the sheriffs show up with a lock and shut it down?






I am not sure about your wells, but I am not sure just how anyone could shut down my well.  I have a 6 inch pipe in the ground, there is no lock on the top, or any way to fasten one.  There is a pump in it that runs with underground piping to to the house, barns, and outdoor hydrants.  Short of physically pulling the pump, I don't know how they could prevent it from being used.  I could always jury rig up power or a second pump if that was an issue anyways.



I don't have any permit for the well anyways, it has been here for years, and I am actually surprised that rural citizens would be willing to accept this.





I was kind of surprised myself.  Apparently, the aquifers are considered public property, and permits are granted based on total foot acreage (if that's the proper term) up to the density the county/state figures the aquifer will support.  Once it's reached its max, they quit granting permits. (or they're supposed to.  Assuming you aren't related to somebody in the .gov)  If the aquifer starts going dry, they start pulling permits, newest first.



They never pulled mine, so I don't know for sure how they do it.  I suspect it would be a fairly simple matter to pull the pump and cap the well with some sort of seal like they do for gas (and, in some cases, electric).  Sure, you can trot out the bolt cutters, but if you get caught, look to be spending some quality time working off the hefty fine as well as possible revocation of the well permit.



Remember, in many parts of the country, even well water is a finite commodity.





 
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:16:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TheOTHERmaninblack:
So what happens when you've got a well and the sheriffs show up with a lock and shut it down?


Shuts down the REAL well, or the one that's just for show?

Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:25:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/9/2011 5:36:09 PM EDT by TomJefferson]
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:36:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/9/2011 5:36:20 PM EDT by FreeBear]


"The city will continue to provide bottled water to residents at city hall until the water supply is restored. But for Kay Bloomfield, 57, it was not enough. "I've got two grand kids I had to bathe in the sink in there!" she told CNN affiliate WFAA-TV."



Oh, the horror!

This woman better realize quick that there's a bigger F-ing problem looming than where she 'has to' bath her grand kids.


Sheeple.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:36:53 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ag04blast:
Well water for the Win!!!  


I have county water and a well as well
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:42:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:47:04 PM EDT
Tulsa was precariously close to a water shutdown.  Almost nobody knew about it except for the families and friends of people on the water crews.
Main lines had ruptured and the tanks were very low.
The Arkansas river is always running and I have the means to make it drinkable but it would have gotten very bad in a hurry around here.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 5:57:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By us-kiwi:

Originally Posted By 7mm-08:
Like others I have over 14K gallons in the backyard.  But as drinking & cooking goes I'm extremely light in preps.

Texas better be careful what they wish for...they might get a couple of hurricanes parking over their state & causing other problems.

7mm

If your pool water is maintained, Chlorine level, pH, alkalinity etc,
it is good to drink, cook with etc.

Or, if it isn't good to drink, you probably shouldn't swim in it, either.

YMMV

 

Absolutely not.  Alot of factors can screw up pool water for drinking.  Best to distill it unless you know EXACTLY what has ALWAYS been put in it.  Use a good filter at very least
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:13:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By elevenbangbang:
Can't they pump water out of Cedar Creek Reservoir?

They're pumping out of Lake Conroe here in Houston.


Cedar Creek Lake has a pipeline that runs to Fort Worth and supplies part of their water suppply.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:38:22 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TomJefferson:

You see in my eyes, the woman lost the has any sense as soon as I read, her grandchildren.



I am sorry but I have no idea what this means.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:50:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/9/2011 6:51:46 PM EDT by FredMan]
Glad I'm on a well and live on a property that has 4 ponds.

ETA:  Also front a river on the back side.  All ponds are fed from water that originates on the property.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 11:00:17 PM EDT



Originally Posted By TomJefferson:




............ it was continuous for the entire week as people would knock on my door, tell me their problems, and seek my advice........  







So... basically the same position you hold here





 
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 11:04:39 PM EDT
I have 4 55-gallon barrels of emergency drinking water. Swimming pool water is for washing dishes, flushing toliets, etc
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 4:23:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By FreeBear:
"The city will continue to provide bottled water to residents at city hall until the water supply is restored. But for Kay Bloomfield, 57, it was not enough. "I've got two grand kids I had to bathe in the sink in there!" she told CNN affiliate WFAA-TV."


If there's a water shortage then that's a waste.  Using wet wipes to bathe for a week or so won't kill you.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 4:45:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Bubbles:
Originally Posted By FreeBear:
"The city will continue to provide bottled water to residents at city hall until the water supply is restored. But for Kay Bloomfield, 57, it was not enough. "I've got two grand kids I had to bathe in the sink in there!" she told CNN affiliate WFAA-TV."


If there's a water shortage then that's a waste.  Using wet wipes to bathe for a week or so won't kill you.


I had to take wetwipe baths before, didn't kill me.
I know people who had to for months.  They smelled dead, but im pretty sure they weren't.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 6:57:02 AM EDT
Water is just one element but it points out the fact that as populations rise, there are precious resources which must be/should be respected.  We waste so much in this society and appear to take more for granted.  Air, water, food:  the basics - and while we are blessed in this country with (for the most part) an abundance of each, most (especially those living in the city areas) take each for granted - sad.
BTW, if you do live in the city (specific to either El Paso Texas or Las Cruces/Albuquerque New Mexico) and run out of your resources, please don't come knocking at my door - look somewhere else.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 5:06:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/10/2011 5:10:58 PM EDT by dcboyd]
Our City, the City of Victoria, Texas is in a major drought.  We have several deep wells that used to be used, until the city decided to purchase river water from the GBRA.  Now that the river is so low, they are pumping this very drinkable water into the river upstream to pick up at their intakes.  The drainage ditches are flowing fresh well water.  tlhis has been going on for several months.  Our city managers and water department are idiots, and should be prosecuted.   No one seems to care.  That is unlil the wells run dry.
There should be law against this waste.  If I new where to go, I would report this. It is against all common sense.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 5:14:02 PM EDT



Originally Posted By dcboyd:


Our City, the City of Victoria, Texas is in a major drought.  We have several deep wells that used to be used, until the city decided to purchase river water from the GBRA.  Now that the river is so low, they are pumping this very drinkable water into the river upstream to pick up at their intakes.  The drainage ditches are flowing fresh well water.  tlhis has been going on for several months.  Our city managers and water department are idiots, and should be prosecuted.   No one seems to care.  That is unlil the wells run dry.

There should be law against this waste.  If I new where to go, I would report this. It is against all common sense.


While I agree with you that the managers are idiots, the phrase "there should be a law" makes the hair in the back of my neck stand on end.  Better to publish and attempt a recall of the idiots doing it than incrementing one more step to total regulation.



 
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 5:38:53 PM EDT
You are right, enough regulation,   When the wells run dry.  They will be sued.   Yet they will fine you, if you water outside of their established time.
Link Posted: 8/12/2011 2:08:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2011 2:09:02 PM EDT by Merlin]
Originally Posted By oldrock:
I hate cleaning our pool and think pools are a waste of money but it came with the house and one perk is water won't be a big issue for us in a SHTF if we bug in. Our bug out in west texas on the other hand has a pond that is dry as a bone and the creek next to our bol is also dry as a bone. Texas is seriously needing some rain.


No shit!  


Link Posted: 8/12/2011 4:59:17 PM EDT
God help the South. It looks awful.

Interesting, the band of no-drought running diagonally up from Mississippi to Ohio.
Link Posted: 8/12/2011 7:10:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By worker:
Water is just one element but it points out the fact that as populations rise, there are precious resources which must be/should be respected.  We waste so much in this society and appear to take more for granted.  Air, water, food:  the basics - and while we are blessed in this country with (for the most part) an abundance of each, most (especially those living in the city areas) take each for granted - sad.
BTW, if you do live in the city (specific to either El Paso Texas or Las Cruces/Albuquerque New Mexico) and run out of your resources, please don't come knocking at my door - look somewhere else.


I promise I won't––I won't need to.
Link Posted: 8/12/2011 7:40:29 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Mr_Psmith:
Originally Posted By TomJefferson:

You see in my eyes, the woman lost the has any sense as soon as I read, her grandchildren.



I am sorry but I have no idea what this means.


The way I read it, it means that, in TJ's eyes, the woman lost all credibility as soon as it was revealed that she is raising her grandchildren.

While it is possible that she is raising her grandchildren due to other factors, based on other experiences with grandparents in this situation, she is likely raising them due to her own child's misconduct and/or lack of responsibility.  

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