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Posted: 5/23/2012 4:45:45 AM EST
Been a tough year for gardening here so far... too cold, too wet, now too dry

But here's a few pics. Most everything is mulched with my favorite cardboard+grass clippings routine.

Onions, garlic, a few 'taters, tomatoes at the poles and a bit of corn in the very back:



More tomatoes, peppers in there somewhere, peas:



Lettuce, herbs, not really sure what else in this one:



Asparagus (recovering this year; weeds almost overtook it last year), horseradish in the background:



Newly tilled/planted corn... to dry for it to come up yet. Big pile of grass clippings stockpiled for mulch:



A few young blueberries and a couple of pecan trees. This field is where most of the grass clippings come from:



Raspberries coming on:



Blackberries ready for picking:



And an experiment... extra Bhut jolokia and Trinidad Scorpion peppers that I'm going to try and hawk at a swap meet:



Stuff is holding out pretty well so far, but we're going to have to start pouring the water to everything if it doesn't rain here pretty quick.



Link Posted: 5/23/2012 5:50:09 AM EST
Nice setup. It looks like you have a little of everything, hopefully my next place will allow me to have something similar.
Link Posted: 5/23/2012 6:04:30 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/23/2012 6:05:02 AM EST by Corporal_Chaos]
I envy you guys that can garden without fencing. It really adds to the infrastructure costs when expanding. Whatever the rabbits didn't eat here, my dogs would dig up so they could lay in the moisture.
Link Posted: 5/23/2012 6:18:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By Corporal_Chaos:
I envy you guys that can garden without fencing. It really adds to the infrastructure costs when expanding. Whatever the rabbits didn't eat here, my dogs would dig up so they could lay in the moisture.


We actually do have much of it fenced off, just have some of it down at the moment. Ours is more for protection from our chickens than anything else, though. We do have a lot of rabbits around too, but those aren't too much of a problem until things start getting dry in mid/late summer. For now they apparently have enough to nibble on out in the the wild, but it'll be .22 time soon enough.

Link Posted: 5/23/2012 8:08:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/23/2012 8:09:10 AM EST by TheRedGoat]
Originally Posted By midmo:
Originally Posted By Corporal_Chaos:
I envy you guys that can garden without fencing. It really adds to the infrastructure costs when expanding. Whatever the rabbits didn't eat here, my dogs would dig up so they could lay in the moisture.


We actually do have much of it fenced off, just have some of it down at the moment. Ours is more for protection from our chickens than anything else, though. We do have a lot of rabbits around too, but those aren't too much of a problem until things start getting dry in mid/late summer. For now they apparently have enough to nibble on out in the the wild, but it'll be .22 time soon enough.



My neighbor complains about rabbits in his garden. I've never seen evidence in mine from them. I keep the grass mowed low and my two devil-hunds seem to keep them at bay. I also think the windmills, with eyes on them, help scare them away.

My problem is moles. My dogs, on several occasions, have destroyed multiple yards of garden plants trying to get one.

Nice garden you have. It is interesting to associate users with gardens after getting advice from many of you over the last year.

About the swap meet, I planted 150' of gourds to re-sell in a local art community this Fall. After reading about the growth rates, I think I probably should have made a new patch just for the gourds. Supposed to be prolific and spread out alot. Hopefully, they will not cover the potatoes and peanuts too much.

TRG
Link Posted: 5/23/2012 12:39:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
It is interesting to associate users with gardens...
TRG


Agreed... I really like seeing what others have done/are doing and have gotten some good ideas from here. That's why I decided to pony up.

Link Posted: 5/23/2012 6:31:41 PM EST
Nice garden, OP.

Surprised that you've had too much cold though. We've been WAY warmer than normal. We're six weeks ahead of normal for almost everything. The gardens I'm seeing look like it's late June.

Link Posted: 5/23/2012 6:51:46 PM EST
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Nice garden, OP.

Surprised that you've had too much cold though. We've been WAY warmer than normal. We're six weeks ahead of normal for almost everything. The gardens I'm seeing look like it's late June.



I'm in Texas, since I was a child, I have heard the phrase, "April shower bring May flowers."

This has never made sense. We have wildflowers in March and early April.

May means 90 temps, bugs and drying grass.

June?

June is dirt, wildfires, and rye grass at best.

I never really thought much about that until I started gardening. Now, water is becoming more of an issue.

TRG
Link Posted: 5/23/2012 7:06:23 PM EST
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Nice garden, OP.

Surprised that you've had too much cold though. We've been WAY warmer than normal. We're six weeks ahead of normal for almost everything. The gardens I'm seeing look like it's late June.



I'm in Texas, since I was a child, I have heard the phrase, "April shower bring May flowers."

This has never made sense. We have wildflowers in March and early April.

May means 90 temps, bugs and drying grass.

June?

June is dirt, wildfires, and rye grass at best.

I never really thought much about that until I started gardening. Now, water is becoming more of an issue.

TRG


I think that saying was created by somebody living in the north.

We're a full month to six weeks ahead of that. March showers bring April flowers really. I figure y'all are two months ahead.
Link Posted: 5/23/2012 11:07:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Nice garden, OP.

Surprised that you've had too much cold though. We've been WAY warmer than normal. We're six weeks ahead of normal for almost everything. The gardens I'm seeing look like it's late June.



We were ahead by about a month too; but then got caught with several late hard frosts that knocked a lot of stuff back. All of our fruit trees got zapped, and that's also part of the reason why the asparagus in the pic above is pretty sparse. So it's actually a combination of being too warm AND too cold that's set us back a bit this year. I'm almost afraid to see what the summer has in store.

Link Posted: 5/24/2012 2:07:34 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/24/2012 2:07:00 PM EST
Where did you get that heavy fencing for the beans?
Link Posted: 5/24/2012 3:41:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By bassackwards:
Where did you get that heavy fencing for the beans?


Cattle panels. Around here they're available from pretty much any feed or ag supply store (Orscheln's, MFA, Tractor Supply, etc.).
They're very useful.. in pic #2, just to the left of the wooden arbor, that clump of vegetation is actually grapevines growing over another arbor made from two cattle panels (16' ea) bent over into an arch. Can also make impromptu greenhouses & stuff out of them like that.

Link Posted: 5/24/2012 4:46:45 PM EST
Hey Midmo, Talk to me about the berries. Want to put out blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries. What kind of sun and what variety.
Link Posted: 5/24/2012 6:26:09 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/24/2012 6:27:31 PM EST by Kitties-with-Sigs]
Are your blackberries wild or tame? Looks like tame bushes, but I wasn't sure.
Link Posted: 5/25/2012 12:20:40 AM EST
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Are your blackberries wild or tame? Looks like tame bushes, but I wasn't sure.

Nope, they're wild, though we try to keep a path mowed around that particular patch to make harvesting easier. I like the wild stuff... we've also got gooseberries, black walnuts, persimmons and wild plums scattered around the property, all volunteers.

Originally Posted By TTUGOOB:
Hey Midmo, Talk to me about the berries. Want to put out blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries. What kind of sun and what variety.

I'll have to talk to Mrs. midmo about the varieties of raspberries & blueberries and report back later, but those are both in full sun. We haven't had a lot of luck with the blueberries in the past... have tried to grow them on and off for 10 years, and it seems like they always have some untimely end - several times from the lawnmower If you look close, you can see a big rock next to each of the blueberry plants - the Mrs.s' Mower Protection Plan.

The blackberries are wild, as mentioned above. We've actually got several patches of those, one of which is right under a big walnut tree. That's kind of unusual because most things won't grow close to a walnut (Google "juglone" or "allelopathy"). Sometimes Mother Nature knows best.

Link Posted: 5/25/2012 2:59:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By midmo:


I'll have to talk to Mrs. midmo




We are a website of rules...

TRG
Link Posted: 5/25/2012 1:29:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/25/2012 2:07:22 PM EST by midmo]
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By midmo:


I'll have to talk to Mrs. midmo




We are a website of rules...

TRG


Now now, this ain't GD...

We come here by way of SF, where posting a picture of your actual person equates to stealing your soul. Or your credit history, or your preps

ETA: Aww, what the heck. The Mrs. gave her permission, so who am I to argue? This lady is the most important thing in my life (along with the kids), and deserves way more of the credit for the garden and homestead than I do:



And THIS is one reason I wouldn't just post a pic without clearing it first :

Link Posted: 5/25/2012 5:12:41 PM EST
Winning.

TRG
Link Posted: 6/3/2012 9:37:06 AM EST
Breaking ground for a new section of garden... dry, dry, dry.

We need rain pretty bad....



If it weren't for heavy mulch and watering the whole garden would probably be belly-up right now.
Link Posted: 6/3/2012 9:39:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By midmo:
Breaking ground for a new section of garden... dry, dry, dry.

We need rain pretty bad....

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/dry.jpg

If it weren't for heavy mulch and watering the whole garden would probably be belly-up right now.


Internal combustion is all that is keeping my corn alive.

TRG
Link Posted: 6/6/2012 1:24:26 AM EST
Not just my imagination... went back a few years on a local weather station looking at the month of May:



A whopping .81 inches in 2012
Link Posted: 6/6/2012 3:30:35 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/6/2012 3:31:33 AM EST by TheRedGoat]
Originally Posted By midmo:
Not just my imagination... went back a few years on a local weather station looking at the month of May:

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/rain.jpg

A whopping .81 inches in 2012


2.75" here since April 20th.

Sucks.

If you guys don't get some rain, it's Dustbowl 2.0 soon, right?

TRG
Link Posted: 6/6/2012 4:24:35 AM EST
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:

2.75" here since April 20th.

Sucks.

If you guys don't get some rain, it's Dustbowl 2.0 soon, right?

TRG


It already seems like it. When I tilled that new patch (rake pic above), those dustbowl pics from the 30's was exactly what was going through my mind.
A major drought in the grain belt and major cattle producing states is the last thing this economy needs right now.

Looks like they just stuck a possibility for rain this Sunday/Monday in the forecast, though. We shall see.
Link Posted: 6/6/2012 4:51:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By midmo:
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:

2.75" here since April 20th.

Sucks.

If you guys don't get some rain, it's Dustbowl 2.0 soon, right?

TRG


It already seems like it. When I tilled that new patch (rake pic above), those dustbowl pics from the 30's was exactly what was going through my mind.
A major drought in the grain belt and major cattle producing states is the last thing this economy needs right now.

Looks like they just stuck a possibility for rain this Sunday/Monday in the forecast, though. We shall see.


We had torrential, but effective, Spring rains for most of North Texas.

Last summer, my friend sold his corn stalks from his garden to a cattleman.

We are not at that level of drought, yet, but it is coming soon.

TRG
Link Posted: 6/6/2012 8:46:47 AM EST
With all this dry hot weather and an early TS in FL, ya'll just might get the hurricane you're asking for by August.
Link Posted: 6/11/2012 5:50:17 AM EST
MidMO, I think you got your wish... I hope the rain makes it's way down south of JC...
Link Posted: 6/11/2012 6:53:52 AM EST
Midmo...garden looks great....you have a pretty large area...how many acres ?

I have a small city lot, so not much room to grow stuff, plus 10 oak trees for lots of shade...but i'm still trying.

Just went through a week of rain, last two days spent drying out some.....

Hope you get some rain, but not 13 inches like Pensacola.

Keep the pics coming...lot's of inspiration. and that wife is a bad-ass hottie.....no offense.
Link Posted: 6/11/2012 7:47:32 AM EST
Originally Posted By Buckshot4U:
MidMO, I think you got your wish... I hope the rain makes it's way down south of JC...


Yep, just shy of 1/2" here today. Woulda liked more - not even close to getting us where we need to be, but I'll take it!
At least maybe we can go a couple days without watering.

Link Posted: 6/11/2012 7:59:40 AM EST
Originally Posted By SFC_77:
Midmo...garden looks great....you have a pretty large area...how many acres ?

+/- 10 acres, about half in woods (oak/hickory/walnut)


I have a small city lot, so not much room to grow stuff, plus 10 oak trees for lots of shade...but i'm still trying.

Nothin' wrong with small gardens... some really nice ones here in the forum! They have some advantages too... much easier to pay close attention to the individual plants, keep an eye out for bugs, etc. I've seen people harvest surprising amounts of food out of small gardens.


Just went through a week of rain, last two days spent drying out some.....

Hope you get some rain, but not 13 inches like Pensacola.

Just got a very badly-needed 1/2" today


Keep the pics coming...lot's of inspiration. and that wife is a bad-ass hottie.....no offense.

None taken! We recognize a compliment when we see one... thanks!

Link Posted: 6/17/2012 11:52:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2012 12:30:34 PM EST by midmo]
WOOT! Got about an inch and a half of rain yesterday!


Even the accompanying 2-hour power outage didn't wipe the smiles off our faces. It's amazing how much better everything looks today... even though we've been watering almost constantly (rotating around), a solid rainstorm just affects the plants completely differently. Hand watering keeps things alive, rain makes it grow. Picked up some drip irrigation stuff last week; gonna see how much that helps from this point on. I suspect it'll help a lot.

ETA: a little sky-juice inspired me to go out and take a couple of update pics.

Same section of the garden in pic 1 of the OP. Onions and some 'taters have been pulled (some of which were fried up together that day... mmmmm). Tomatoes coming on pretty strong.



New cornfield, pic 5 in the OP (shot from another angle):



Bhut jalokias, Trinidad Scorpions, Caribbean Red Habaneros. These were leftovers that didn't sell at the swap meet (OP pic 9). This is the area in the "dry, dry, dry" pic above. Plants are having a hard time of it, but hopefully yesterday's rain will help kick 'em into gear. Plan is now to try and sell the peppers (and ground up powders and whatnot) rather than the plants once they start producing.



This year's coffee bean crop. Production down 66% from last year, when we had THREE beans



Told my daughter to go build a scarecrow for that new corn field. I don't know if bothers the crows, but it damn sure scares the hell out of me!



Link Posted: 6/17/2012 1:20:22 PM EST
Originally Posted By midmo:
WOOT! Got about an inch and a half of rain yesterday!


Even the accompanying 2-hour power outage didn't wipe the smiles off our faces. It's amazing how much better everything looks today... even though we've been watering almost constantly (rotating around), a solid rainstorm just affects the plants completely differently. Hand watering keeps things alive, rain makes it grow. Picked up some drip irrigation stuff last week; gonna see how much that helps from this point on. I suspect it'll help a lot.

ETA: a little sky-juice inspired me to go out and take a couple of update pics.

Same section of the garden in pic 1 of the OP. Onions and some 'taters have been pulled (some of which were fried up together that day... mmmmm). Tomatoes coming on pretty strong.

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0001.jpg

New cornfield, pic 5 in the OP (shot from another angle):

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0004.jpg

Bhut jalokias, Trinidad Scorpions, Caribbean Red Habaneros. These were leftovers that didn't sell at the swap meet (OP pic 9). This is the area in the "dry, dry, dry" pic above. Plants are having a hard time of it, but hopefully yesterday's rain will help kick 'em into gear. Plan is now to try and sell the peppers (and ground up powders and whatnot) rather than the plants once they start producing.

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0007.jpg

This year's coffee bean crop. Production down 66% from last year, when we had THREE beans

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0009.jpg

Told my daughter to go build a scarecrow for that new corn field. I don't know if bothers the crows, but it damn sure scares the hell out of me!

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0005.jpg



Scared me too.

TRG
Link Posted: 6/19/2012 6:16:25 PM EST
Originally Posted By midmo:
WOOT! Got about an inch and a half of rain yesterday!


Even the accompanying 2-hour power outage didn't wipe the smiles off our faces. It's amazing how much better everything looks today... even though we've been watering almost constantly (rotating around), a solid rainstorm just affects the plants completely differently. Hand watering keeps things alive, rain makes it grow. Picked up some drip irrigation stuff last week; gonna see how much that helps from this point on. I suspect it'll help a lot.

ETA: a little sky-juice inspired me to go out and take a couple of update pics.

Same section of the garden in pic 1 of the OP. Onions and some 'taters have been pulled (some of which were fried up together that day... mmmmm). Tomatoes coming on pretty strong.

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0001.jpg

New cornfield, pic 5 in the OP (shot from another angle):

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0004.jpg

Bhut jalokias, Trinidad Scorpions, Caribbean Red Habaneros. These were leftovers that didn't sell at the swap meet (OP pic 9). This is the area in the "dry, dry, dry" pic above. Plants are having a hard time of it, but hopefully yesterday's rain will help kick 'em into gear. Plan is now to try and sell the peppers (and ground up powders and whatnot) rather than the plants once they start producing.

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0007.jpg

This year's coffee bean crop. Production down 66% from last year, when we had THREE beans

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0009.jpg

Told my daughter to go build a scarecrow for that new corn field. I don't know if bothers the crows, but it damn sure scares the hell out of me!

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0005.jpg



Okay that scarecrow is effin' awesome!

And I love your little garden shed.

Link Posted: 6/19/2012 11:01:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By midmo:
Been a tough year for gardening here so far... too cold, too wet, now too dry

But here's a few pics. Most everything is mulched with my favorite cardboard+grass clippings routine.

And an experiment... extra Bhut jolokia and Trinidad Scorpion peppers that I'm going to try and hawk at a swap meet:

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/DSC_0276.jpg

Stuff is holding out pretty well so far, but we're going to have to start pouring the water to everything if it doesn't rain here pretty quick.


What potting mix do you use to start your pepper seeds and grow out the seedlings?
Link Posted: 6/20/2012 12:49:00 AM EST
Originally Posted By Condition_1:
What potting mix do you use to start your pepper seeds and grow out the seedlings?


I cheated... 1:1 ratio of bagged compost and topsoil from the hardware store, mixed together in a wheelbarrow like concrete. Turned out a little heavy; probably could have used a bag of vermiculite or perlite in there too, but I was trying to keep the cost down since they were ultimately for sale. Had to consider the cost of the seeds, growing medium, and the 6" pots. I about broke even with the number of plants I sold, but the leftovers will now produce some fruit that will hopefully bring a modest profit.

Link Posted: 7/7/2012 1:20:04 AM EST
A few update pics...

The "scarecrow" corn field is doing OK. No crows... I think the Japanese beetles ate them



Top cornfield taking some damage. Even with daily watering, the heat & drought are getting to them. I've never seen corn sunburn before - afternoon sun between 3 and 5:00 is just brutal:



Our grass is crunchy



Like the corn, the horseradish is suffering even with watering:



Drip irrigation, like an IV keeping this part of the garden alive:



More drip, this is the patch of Bhut jolokia's and Trinidad Scorpions. They should be bigger by now...



Coupl'a japs peeking through:



Lima's aren't happy even with the IV:



We'll see if we can keep enough water on these guys:



We need rain!

Link Posted: 7/7/2012 3:13:13 AM EST
I've seen a lot of stunting on my plants here too. My peas died despite the watering that I was doing.

From what I read, corn needs .3 to .4 inches of water per day. That means 2.1" to 2.8" of water each week. Toward the end of my corn's growth (last two weeks of growth and ear production) we were out of subsoil moisture.

From looking at your corn, you are not watering them enough. My neighbor's corn curled and burned up.

Mine did not, because I was spending two hours per day to put water on it. My patch is 15' by 90'. I was putting 1000-1500 gallons of water per day on it and it was just barely enough to prevent the majority of the stunting and wilting.

Grab a calculator and do the math, I'd be willing to bet that you have the right fertilizer mix, but not the right amount of water being added.

TRG
Link Posted: 7/7/2012 3:23:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
I've seen a lot of stunting on my plants here too. My peas died despite the watering that I was doing.

From what I read, corn needs .3 to .4 inches of water per day. That means 2.1" to 2.8" of water each week. Toward the end of my corn's growth (last two weeks of growth and ear production) we were out of subsoil moisture.

From looking at your corn, you are not watering them enough. My neighbor's corn curled and burned up.

Mine did not, because I was spending two hours per day to put water on it. My patch is 15' by 90'. I was putting 1000-1500 gallons of water per day on it and it was just barely enough to prevent the majority of the stunting and wilting.

Grab a calculator and do the math, I'd be willing to bet that you have the right fertilizer mix, but not the right amount of water being added.

TRG


That could well be, but we're giving it all we can... our well just won't take any more. That's the reason for the barrels feeding the drip irrigation - we can fill those up during "non-peak" times. We pretty much spend all day going in half-hour cycles watering stuff. Next year we'll probably have them drill the well a little deeper.

On the other hand, the corn's really not as bad as it looks. It's hard to tell from the pic, but the crispy ones are pretty much confined to that one row, which is on the west side and gets the full brunt of the afternoon sun.
Link Posted: 7/7/2012 3:38:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By midmo:
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
I've seen a lot of stunting on my plants here too. My peas died despite the watering that I was doing.

From what I read, corn needs .3 to .4 inches of water per day. That means 2.1" to 2.8" of water each week. Toward the end of my corn's growth (last two weeks of growth and ear production) we were out of subsoil moisture.

From looking at your corn, you are not watering them enough. My neighbor's corn curled and burned up.

Mine did not, because I was spending two hours per day to put water on it. My patch is 15' by 90'. I was putting 1000-1500 gallons of water per day on it and it was just barely enough to prevent the majority of the stunting and wilting.

Grab a calculator and do the math, I'd be willing to bet that you have the right fertilizer mix, but not the right amount of water being added.

TRG


That could well be, but we're giving it all we can... our well just won't take any more. That's the reason for the barrels feeding the drip irrigation - we can fill those up during "non-peak" times. We pretty much spend all day going in half-hour cycles watering stuff. Next year we'll probably have them drill the well a little deeper.

On the other hand, the corn's really not as bad as it looks. It's hard to tell from the pic, but the crispy ones are pretty much confined to that one row, which is on the west side and gets the full brunt of the afternoon sun.


I understand about the well. Mine could not keep up last year.

Luckily, in Texas, I can pump water from my creek, but it takes time, money, gasoline, electricity and manpower to do what a nice rain could do better.

TRG
Link Posted: 7/25/2012 12:06:08 AM EST
TRG's right about the corn... even watering as much as we could, we harvested maybe 30% of what we'd normally expect from this little patch. Only twenty or so ears worth keeping as corn-on-the-cob, and 10 quart-sized Foodsaver bags of cut corn, from the uglier ears. Looked like this three days after we stopped watering:



The real tragedy, though, is that ALL the corn in this area looks like this now. News reports are calling the Missouri corn crop "unsalvageable". As of July 17, USDA had 93.5% of the state listed in the 'severe drought' category (link), 23% in 'extreme'. There's been no rain since, so this week's figures will be even more grim. Downstream effects of this year's growing season are going to be painful, I fear.

Horseradish isn't happy either, even with the watering:



On the bright side, the drip irrigation stuff I set up is like life-support for the tomatoes and peppers:



and just for comparison to one of the pics above, it's also helping my Trinidad Scorpion/Bhut jolokia/paprika patch:



Slight chance of rain later in the week. I hope so, but I'm not holding my breath. As in one of TRG's posts in another thread, it seems that even when there are little pop-up storms in the area, they dance around our place like there is a force field around it. It's 83F here now at 04:00, with a forecast high of 102, heat index around 110.

Relentless.
Link Posted: 7/25/2012 10:32:00 AM EST
Got a half inch, maybe less, on Saturday. It rained less than 20 minutes.

The drought here is also relentless.

I was watering my garden this afternoon and thought about your corn problems. I gave my fall crop of indian corn an extra drink of water in memory of your loss.

TRG
Link Posted: 7/25/2012 2:19:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/25/2012 2:43:51 PM EST by midmo]
Oh yeah... I forgot to talk about the Possum Horde Invasion.
First it was 'coons - trapped/shot 5 in a month, stealing eggs and chicken feed.
Now, the possums have decided that midmo's nicely irrigated tomatoes are the tastiest things in the county. They won't mess with the traps... too many nice juicy tomatoes hanging close by. I've been going out just after dark and when I get up in the morning (2:30-ish) and running a patrol. Got two this morning, missed one. So far, every day the possums get about 5 tomatoes, we get maybe two.

Gardening this year is more a matter of principle than sustenance.

––––
ETA: Supper tonight was BLT's with tomatoes the possums left us.
It's still worth it.
Link Posted: 7/26/2012 3:46:15 AM EST


There is some strange, clear liquid falling out of the sky and onto my property!



Actually up to .31" since I took this screenshot. Ain't a lot, but I'll take it!
Link Posted: 7/26/2012 5:40:23 AM EST
We got .18". At least it was something. I'm getting tomatoes and a few peppers now. Most of the peppers are burning up. Potatoes and onions are out and in storage already.
Link Posted: 7/26/2012 3:38:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By midmo:


There is some strange, clear liquid falling out of the sky and onto my property!

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/littlerain.jpg

Actually up to .31" since I took this screenshot. Ain't a lot, but I'll take it!




Get out in it and dance around.

Maybe it'll help it keep falling.

Link Posted: 7/27/2012 3:43:08 AM EST
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Originally Posted By midmo:


There is some strange, clear liquid falling out of the sky and onto my property!

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/littlerain.jpg

Actually up to .31" since I took this screenshot. Ain't a lot, but I'll take it!




Get out in it and dance around.

Maybe it'll help it keep falling.



I haven't been able to get rain here, so I am now pumping 6000 gallons per day to my gardens.

Apparently nobody appreciated my naked gasoline dance at ExxonMobile HQ.

TRG
Link Posted: 7/27/2012 4:57:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Originally Posted By midmo:


There is some strange, clear liquid falling out of the sky and onto my property!

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/littlerain.jpg

Actually up to .31" since I took this screenshot. Ain't a lot, but I'll take it!




Get out in it and dance around.

Maybe it'll help it keep falling.



I haven't been able to get rain here, so I am now pumping 6000 gallons per day to my gardens.

Apparently nobody appreciated my naked gasoline dance at ExxonMobile HQ.

TRG


That's a lot of water. Is it coming from your well?

Link Posted: 7/28/2012 4:23:35 AM EST
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Originally Posted By midmo:


There is some strange, clear liquid falling out of the sky and onto my property!

http://i1010.photobucket.com/albums/af227/mid_mo/Garden%202012/littlerain.jpg

Actually up to .31" since I took this screenshot. Ain't a lot, but I'll take it!




Get out in it and dance around.

Maybe it'll help it keep falling.



I haven't been able to get rain here, so I am now pumping 6000 gallons per day to my gardens.

Apparently nobody appreciated my naked gasoline dance at ExxonMobile HQ.

TRG


That's a lot of water. Is it coming from your well?



I dammed my creek. It is a small creek, but, according to a local university it has been flowing for a thousand years. There is an artesian spring a mile east of me that feeds it. Evidence of indian habitation along it, and old creek channels where it has moved over the centuries. It is not alot of water, but, it adds up over a 24hr period.

According to my math the flow rate is under 15 gpm in this drought. But, DPeacher helped me expand my dam so now I have a reservoir of about 7k useable, 10k total gallons.

TRG
Link Posted: 8/1/2012 5:31:10 AM EST
MO gardening this year has been hard. My tomatoes and peppers are in bad shape. Green beans got eaten by ground hogs and peas feel victim to the early heat wave.

Grove
Link Posted: 8/1/2012 6:47:25 AM EST
Originally Posted By Grove:
MO gardening this year has been hard. My tomatoes and peppers are in bad shape. Green beans got eaten by ground hogs and peas feel victim to the early heat wave.

Grove


Ayup. My summary so far:

  • Cucumbers: did surprisingly well, seein' as we only watered them with the hose once in a while. Had to battle Japanese beetles all the way.

  • Broccoli: nary a head.

  • Onions: did OK; didn't have a lot planted.

  • Garlic: same as onions

  • Corn: will see 30-50% of normal yield, watering as much as we can with a hose.

  • Paprika peppers: miserable, even with drip irrigation. Plants never thrived.

  • Hot peppers: doing OK (with drip irrigation), but seem awfully slow to put on fruit this year. Hope they make it.

  • Tomatoes: doing pretty good, only due to drip irrigation. Main problem with them this year is possums

  • Green beans: total loss; watering with the hose but they never put on any beans.

  • Lima beans: drip irrigated, but the plants never really took off. Abandoned them last week to save water for other stuff.

  • Potatoes: did OK, but they put on most of their growth before things got quite so dry. Harvested kinda early, so most were pretty small.

  • Fruit trees: total loss. No way to irrigate, gonna lose some of the trees. Bummer.

  • Blackberries: some critter got to 'em before we did.

  • Raspberries: maybe 5% normal production. Too dry.

  • Grapes: never have done really well with them (not enough TLC), but this year was worse. Blue jays are mad at us for not taking better care of them.

  • Watermelons: doing pretty good, surprisingly. Watering with buckets.



Link Posted: 8/1/2012 7:00:20 AM EST
"abandoned to save water for other stuff"

I've decided to do this as well.

I can't pump enough from my creek to water everything that I have planted. My new fruit trees might survive the grasshoppers, but I expect the drought to take them too

Now, I water the fall garden and the sweet potatoes.

Even with a limited amount of watering, I still run my creek dry by mid-afternoon.

TRG
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