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Posted: 6/15/2009 8:42:33 AM EST
Guys,

Just started setting up these new shelving units in the basement. Lots of room now.

I have a nice cache of Coleman gas tanks that I picked up from Wmart over the winter. Maybe 12 or so...not sure. I thought about putting them on these new shelves.

Would you guys store those small Coleman gas tanks in your basement? Would that be incredibly stupid?

Thanks.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:54:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 8:54:43 AM EST by boostedboxer]
Are you talking about the Coleman propane tanks or the duel fuel cans? Either way I'd probably store them away from my house as I would gasoline
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:32:27 AM EST
Not much help but I keep mine in my garage. Basement is finished..
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:42:47 AM EST
Here are what I believe the NFPA codes:

Storage of Flammable Liquids (Gasoline and Coleman White Gas)

Maximum residential storage of flammable liquids (gasoline and white gas) shall be limited to 25 gallons; preferably stored in an unattached garage or shed. Of this 25 gallon total, no more than 10 gallons can be stored in an attached garage; and absolutely no flammable liquid storage is allowed in basements. (2000 IFC 3404.3.4.4, NFPA 30)

Empty containers shall be counted as full when calculating total storage capacity. (2000 IFC 3404.3.3.4)

Flammable liquid storage containers shall be of an approved type. (2000 IFC 3404.3.1.1) Most of these containers are labeled as approved for flammable liquid use, and indicate the standards they are designed to meet (DOT, ASTM, NFPA 30, etc.) Always use approved or original retail containers. (No Used Milk Jugs!)

If you decide to store more than 5 gallons of flammable liquids at your home, you need at
least one 2A10BC rated fire extinguisher, located no closer than 10 feet, and no further than 50 feet. (2000 IFC 3404.3.3.1)

Control of sources of ignition is mandatory! All transfer and dispensing of flammable liquids requires careful attention be paid to eliminating static spark discharge, and ignition of flammable vapors. Open flames and high temperature devices must be controlled and approved for use with flammable liquids. And smoking is prohibited in the storage area. (2000 IFC 3405.3.2, 3404.2.4)

Flammable and Combustible liquids in fuel tanks of motor vehicles (gasoline, diesel and 2-cycle blends) are exempt and therefore not considered as part of your total home fuel storage quantities. (2000 IFC 3404.3.3)

Home Storage of Combustible Liquids (Diesel, Kerosene and Lamp Oil)

Maximum residential storage of combustible liquids (Diesel, Kerosene and Lamp Oil) shall be limited to 60 gallons; preferably stored in an unattached garage or shed. Of this 60 gallon total, no more than 10 gallons can be stored in an attached garage; and absolutely no combustible liquid storage is allowed in basements. (2000 IFC 3404.3.4.3, 3404.3.5.1, NFPA 30)

Combustible liquid storage containers shall be of an approved type. (2000 IFC 3405.2.4) Most of these containers are labeled as approved for flammable liquid use, and indicate the standards they are designed to meet (DOT, ASTM, NFPA30, etc). (No Used Milk Jugs!)

If you decide to store more than 25 gallons of combustible liquids at home you need at least two 2A10BC rated extinguishers, located no closer than 10 feet, and no further away than 50 feet. (2000 IFC 3403.2.1, 906.3)

Control of ignition sources is mandatory! All transfer and dispensing of combustible liquids requires careful attention be paid to eliminating static spark discharge, and ignition of flammable vapors. Open flames and high temperature devices must be controlled and approved for use with flammable/combustible liquids. And smoking is prohibited in the storage area. (2000 IFC 3405.3.2, 3404.2.4)

Portable Kerosene heating appliances shall be (UL) listed, and shall be limited to a fuel tank capacity of 2 gallons. (2000 IFC 603.4, 603.4.1) However, the Uniform Fire Code (Article 61) specifically prohibits the use of these unvented heating appliances in occupied living spaces. If you decide to use these devices, closely follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use, always maintain adequate separation from combustible surfaces, maintain good ventilation in order to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, and use a battery powered Carbon Monoxide detector to detect dangerous conditions.

Home Storage of Flammable Gases (Propane and Butane)

Residential Propane storage issues are more complex than those for flammable and combustible liquids. If you want a permanent LP-Gas system and tank installed, county ordinance allows you up to 2000 gallons water capacity in heavily populated areas, provided you obtain a permit, comply with relevant installation codes, and hire a state licensed contractor to perform the work and supply the equipment. However some cities have passed local ordinances that restrict total LP-Gas capacity to 500 gallons or less, where natural gas service is readily available. Please contact any state licensed Propane supplier, under "Gas-Propane" in the yellow pages, for more information regarding permanent Propane gas installations. (2000 IFC 3803, 3804)

For portable DOT tank storage, you are allowed up to 25 gallons total capacity. You could have up to five 5-gallon (20 lb.) portable appliance cylinders (the size usually found on barbecue grills – DOT 4BA240); or one 23 gallon (100 lb.) cylinder (DOT 4b240), in storage at your home, in an unattached garage or shed. But, if you want to store propane and flammable/combustible liquids together, they should be separated by at least 10 feet. (2000 IFC 3809.12)

You are only allowed to store up to two (2) of the small portable 1–pound disposable propane cylinders inside your home or attached garage. All other propane cylinders storage must be outside your home in an unattached garage or shed.

Propane cylinders attached to heating and/or cooking appliances, as well as those mounted on trailers, motor homes, and campers, do not count towards your total storage capacity.

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:43:45 AM EST
I would say you are probably pushing the limit in basement storage. I would not store 25# in the basement. Remember propane is heavy so it settles to the floor. A leak will saturate the floor level and look for a source of ignition. If you have a gas or oil boiler you could have a KB. THe chances of all your small tanks leaking at once are remote so you are probably OK. If you have a good house fire they may cook off somewhat spectaularly.... but that will happen if they are left in the garage to. Some citys and fire departments put limits on storing flammables and gunpowders in private residences!
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:53:31 AM EST
whenever possible, i like to keep most stuff that ignites easily Away from the house.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 11:02:11 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 11:45:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By blackhawkhunter:
I would say you are probably pushing the limit in basement storage. I would not store 25# in the basement. Remember propane is heavy so it settles to the floor. A leak will saturate the floor level and look for a source of ignition. If you have a gas or oil boiler you could have a KB. THe chances of all your small tanks leaking at once are remote so you are probably OK. If you have a good house fire they may cook off somewhat spectaularly.... but that will happen if they are left in the garage to. Some citys and fire departments put limits on storing flammables and gunpowders in private residences!


What he said.

I have satyed at a Holiday Inn Express, and:
I is a firefighter for a living. Not quoting NFPA because your city/state may or may not go by that. Speaking for myself as to what I know and have seen in the real world.. If your talking 1# LPG tanks, new, not dented, rusted, or holes plugged by JB weld, then odds are they will be safe in the basement. However read and head….. if your luck is like mine you will get the 1 in 500,000 bottle that has a faulty rubber seal. LPG has a Specific gravity of Vapor at 15 deg C of 1.5 where as air is 1. What does this mean, its heavier than air. I have a gas H2O heater, the pilot light is about 3” off of the floor, the odds are of having an explosion are slim and non from a leak of that much LPG. But there are damned good odds that the gas will ignite and light other shit on fire, then your house and basement fires are the SUCK of all fires... think crawling down a chimney to put out the fire... If you do not have any major flame sources in the basement your mileage will vary––- Depending on the fire and the FD response time, if your upstairs burns into the basement, 25#’s of LPG in 1# bottles is the least of your problems, and as a fire fighter would be the least of mine.

Its 25# like this that gets your atention


<o:p>
</o:p></?xml:namespace> [div]that one came right out of the building to greet us as we pulled up.

Now if you are talking about Coleman white gas… NO WAY ON GODS GREEN EARTH is that going in my basement.


[div] <o:p> </o:p></?xml:namespace>That being said, all my stuff like that, is in the garage
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 12:07:10 PM EST
Thanks guys.

It's a no go.
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