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Posted: 10/10/2007 10:40:14 AM EDT
Figured someone here might know about this . . .

We need a whole house water filter, have been to numerous websites trying to figure this out and it just got us lost more.

We know nothing about this except we do need one.

Can anyone suggest a good brand we could use with out 220 ft. well?

Or maybe direct us to someone who would know?

Thanks
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 11:56:48 AM EDT
The depth of the well doesn't make any difference in which filter you select.

This is what I have - Big Brand Filter

Stage 1 is a dual wound filter: 50 micron / 5 micron.
Stage 2 is a 5 micron carbon for removing any organics (pesticides, benzene, etc.)

The filters are installed after the pressure tank - before it goes into the house. I fliter the drip system with sperate filters in the valve boxes.

These are great guys to deal with!
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 12:14:35 PM EDT
The first thing you have to know is the level of contaminants you're dealing with. Have you had your raw water tested first?

You might have naturally occurring contaminants. You could have iron, calcium, tannins, sulphur, organics - just to name a few things. Then there's the bio hazzards that may or may not be present like micro organisms (bacteria), cysts, etc. Then finally, there are the man made chemicals that could have leached into your well.

I don't know if they still do it, but Sears used to accept water samples that they would have tested. If not, there's bound to be a lab around somewhere that does. If you can't find a place on your own, check with some of the local water treatment companies to see where you can take your sample.

Whole house carbon filters work great in the right application. I have one on my water system, and it has made a tremendous difference.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 2:41:01 PM EDT
test your water first, either the well driller can do it, or your local ext office, sometimes the state has facility for doing it. I have whole house filter to go along with my softener, plus I have an RO system
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 3:27:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 3:15:36 AM EDT by Full-Auto]
I use a common glass fiber filter for the whole house. I went with the General Ecology Seagull filter for drinking water. It is the same technology as the portable First Need Deluxe. It's expensive $450 or so, and the filter cartridges are expensive at around $72 but when I did the research a couple years ago, the specs were better than the other ones I looked at. The water tastes great and I have been very pleased except when I have to replace the cartridge.

Full-Auto


Link Posted: 10/10/2007 3:52:06 PM EDT
Thanks for all the help guys.

I think we also need a softener too. Water leaves orange stains in sinks, toilet, shower.

Sometimes a rural life can be taxing but I guess it's better than urban living.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 8:59:52 PM EDT
Ditto on what the others have said about testing first. But, here's what I did. The house I bought a few years ago has a 100 plus foot deep well that provides good water but also had the orange stains. It was simply sediment. Started stopping up the screens on my washing machine and faucets. Iwent to the local Ace Hardware and picked up a couple of home testing kits, (bacteria,lead, and other chemicals). All these being negative I picked up two whole house filter kits from the Ace. Then I had my local plumber install them (in line, after the pressure tank). Could have done it myself but went much faster with the plumber. In the first unit I use a 20 micron spun filter that takes out the larger particles. Then in the second unit I use a .5 to 1 micron spun filter to get the really fine stuff. These work great for my situation.

This set up will reduce the pressure at the faucet. I once tried a carbon filter in the second unit but it reduced the pressure too much. (I have 1/2 inch lines under the house. 3/4 inch would help with pressure loss.) Now I just run all my drinking water from the kitchen sink through a Brita pitcher (charcoal filter). Not really necessary, but I think it slightly improves the taste of already great water.

The filter set up cost me about (less than $100) + the plumbers fee. Filters should be replaced every 2 to 3 months depending on how much water you put through them. They can be had for about $15 for a 2 pack. Just my .02 cts

MIKE PS try this before going the water softener route.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:22:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 3:28:03 AM EDT by RV-1]

Originally Posted By mike-in-savannah:
Ditto on what the others have said about testing first. But, here's what I did. The house I bought a few years ago has a 100 plus foot deep well that provides good water but also had the orange stains. It was simply sediment. Started stopping up the screens on my washing machine and faucets. Iwent to the local Ace Hardware and picked up a couple of home testing kits, (bacteria,lead, and other chemicals). All these being negative I picked up two whole house filter kits from the Ace. Then I had my local plumber install them (in line, after the pressure tank). Could have done it myself but went much faster with the plumber. In the first unit I use a 20 micron spun filter that takes out the larger particles. Then in the second unit I use a .5 to 1 micron spun filter to get the really fine stuff. These work great for my situation.

This set up will reduce the pressure at the faucet. I once tried a carbon filter in the second unit but it reduced the pressure too much. (I have 1/2 inch lines under the house. 3/4 inch would help with pressure loss.) Now I just run all my drinking water from the kitchen sink through a Brita pitcher (charcoal filter). Not really necessary, but I think it slightly improves the taste of already great water.

The filter set up cost me about (less than $100) + the plumbers fee. Filters should be replaced every 2 to 3 months depending on how much water you put through them. They can be had for about $15 for a 2 pack. Just my .02 cts

MIKE PS try this before going the water softener route.


Mike,

Did they orange stains go away after that?

I'm worried about our water heater, washing machine, dishwasher, etc collecting that scale. The two inlines will prevent this?

ETA: I have 1" PVC main supply line which comes from the pump and goes to the water heater where it splits off into 3/4" Pex which supplies the rest of the house.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 9:28:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 9:29:49 AM EDT by dougman]
Hey if your interested this is a fairly new technology from G.E. Water.
It works with Zenon membranes.
Bacteria Removal** >99.99999%
Virus removal ** >99.999%
Cyst removal ** >99.95%
Supposedly it works great and takes very little maintenance and requires no electricity.

http://www.homespring.com/about.shtml
If its more costmetic stuff that you are worried about let me know what the symptoms are and I can maybe help you select the correct unit.
If your interested drop me an IM were in the water filtration business and I could get a dealer price on one of them for you.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 10:10:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dougman:
Hey if your interested this is a fairly new technology from G.E. Water.
It works with Zenon membranes.
Bacteria Removal** >99.99999%
Virus removal ** >99.999%
Cyst removal ** >99.95%
Supposedly it works great and takes very little maintenance and requires no electricity.

http://www.homespring.com/about.shtml
If its more costmetic stuff that you are worried about let me know what the symptoms are and I can maybe help you select the correct unit.
If your interested drop me an IM were in the water filtration business and I could get a dealer price on one of them for you.


This is interesting, thanks for posting.

Does GE make a replacement RO cartridge using this new Zenon membrane that will fit a standard RO system?
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