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Posted: 9/10/2013 12:11:01 PM EDT
Just checked the numbers...S/N is lucky number 13 with a K index of 3.  Here in Indy it's 96*F and dry as a popcorn fart, and the lawn care folks want to come out and aerate my "lawn" for $100.  
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 12:35:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By BigDaddy0004:
Just checked the numbers...S/N is lucky number 13 with a K index of 3.  Here in Indy it's 96*F and dry as a popcorn fart, and the lawn care folks want to come out and aerate my "lawn" for $100.  
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You know BD this is my first sunspot high as a general.  I've not been impressed.  I'm surprised that I've made as many DX contacts as I have.


Vulcan94
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 1:29:34 PM EDT
Want to trade I have a new pond in my yard

Link Posted: 9/10/2013 1:38:57 PM EDT
Recent picture comparison from SolarHam.com  




I hear crickets !!    
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 1:48:16 PM EDT
For the guys that aren't read up on sunspot numbers how about you give me them a little lesson.
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 2:27:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/10/2013 2:41:19 PM EDT by BigDaddy0004]
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Originally Posted By gcw:
For the guys that aren't read up on sunspot numbers how about you give me them a little lesson.
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Originally Posted By gcw:
For the guys that aren't read up on sunspot numbers how about you give me them a little lesson.

I'm still looking for a cheat sheet I have stashed around here somewhere that helps me to understand this Voodoo stuff that is predicting propagation.

The following quote is from Understanding HF propagation reports.

SN: Sunspot Numbers: This value is the visible number of spots on the Sun’s surface. Traditionally, the higher the number, the better the ionization of our atmosphere which will help create great HF propagation conditions. The range of SN can be between 0 and up to 250, sometimes more. It is somewhat rare that we see over 200 sun spots, and when we do, it might be an ideal time to turn on your Transceiver!


This quote is from The Basics of Radio Wave Propagation.

Current Solar Terrestrial Activity Report

A- and K-index: Geomagnetic activity indices, high indices (K:>5 or A:>20) means stormy conditions with an active geomagnetic field. The more active, the more unstable propagation with possible periods of total propagation fade-out. Especially around the higher latitudes and especially at the polar regions, where the geomagnetic field is weak, propagation may disappear completely. Extreme high indices may result in aurora propagation, with strongly degraded long distance propagation at all latitudes. Sporadic-E is strongest during low indices. Low indices result in relative good propagation, especially noticeable around the higher latitudes, when transpolar paths may open up. Maximum K-index is 9, and the A-index can exceed well over 100 during very severe storm conditions, with no maximum. The ARRL often reports the K-index from the Alaskian station where this index is known as the College K-index. Other stations reporting K-indices include Planetary and Boulder. In contrast, the A-indices are usually reported for the Planetary station only.

The higher the K-index, the more unstable propagation becomes, the effect is stronger at high latitudes, but weaker near low latitudes.
When storm level is reached, propagation strongly degrades, possibly fade out at high latitudes.
Classification of K-indices are as follows:

K0=Inactive
K1=Very quiet
K2=Quiet
K3=Unsettled
K4=Active
K5=Minor storm
K6=Major storm
K7=Severe storm
K8=Very severe storm
K9=Extremely severe storm

As with the K-index, the higher the A-index, the more unstable propagation becomes.
Classification of A-indices are as follows:

A0 - A7 = quiet
A8 - A15 = unsettled
A16 - A29 = active
A30 - A49 = minor storm
A50 - A99 = major storm
A100 - A400 = severe storm
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 4:28:48 PM EDT
What's the lowest sunspot number you've seen lately?
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Uhm................. zero
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 6:24:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2013 4:22:31 AM EDT by Mndless]
The cliffs notes version...

Stuff we all know

Radio waves in the HF spectrum 'reflect' off the ionosphere...  once they get through the pesky D layer (all but goes away at night)...  the more 'ionized' the upper level of the atmosphere, the more effective it is in reflecting these waves back down....

The more sun spot activity is directly tied and proportional to the ionization levels of the upper atmosphere and how effective our signals are returned to earth....  and... increases the MUF so we can all enjoy some 10m DX

so... sun spot numbers (A) , is proportional to ionization (Z)  which is proportional to effective propagation (R)....

Then, we can simplify by saying A ~= R...   or more accurately A sub Z =~ R...  

or, in other words...   A =~ DX         Or one step further...   we set QSL Card collection rate to Q

A reduced value of A directly effects a reduced Q  !!

A == Q




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