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Posted: 11/29/2016 9:54:34 PM EST
I live in WV and work in MD so 2 things to consider is i can't (legally) have a pistol and i will have to cross a river if bridges are not crossable

Its about a 35mile hike

List:

Quality knife around 7in blade (or more)
Fire starting kit (cotton balls in petroleum jelly with a firestick)
LIfestraw
small fishing kit (couple hooks and small line)
3 day 3500 calorie bars as a last resort backup
Map of the area

Winter gear
gloves
Balaclava
good jacket (would be in my SUV not the bag)
small folding shovel



What else? Or what would you remove?
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 10:20:22 PM EST
First thing that comes to mind is extra socks and good boots.

There are some great ideas in this thread: Ragnar's GHB
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 10:23:41 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By T2OPFOR:
First thing that comes to mind is extra socks and good boots.

There are some great ideas in this thread: Ragnar's GHB
View Quote


I have boots so I'm good on that.

extra socks, good idea.

i also considered vacuum sealing the gloves, socks, etc to compress to save space


im gong to check out the link you posted, thanks!
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 10:24:58 PM EST
I would add a first aid kit.

Also, if you have to cross a river then I would recommend a change of clothes in a water tight bag. Getting wet in fall or winter is a good way to get hypothermia. Pants, socks, and a shirt. If you get wet then you can change and then build a fire to dry your wet clothes when you stop for the night.

Rope or para cord would be good.

Depending on how rural the area you have to cross is, you might want to add something that you can make an emergency shelter from. You may need improvise something to get out of the weather. Maybe a tarp some rope and a couple of stakes (you could probably improvise those) for a makeshift tent, or top of a lean too.

If you can't have a handgun, then can you have a long gun? A 10/22 or Henry Survival Rifle? Any gun is better than no gun, and if you can cap a couple squirrels or rabbits then your trip might be easier.

Flashlights are always good to have.

Can you throw an extra pair of boots into the truck?


Link Posted: 11/29/2016 10:40:24 PM EST
Folding shovels all suck. If you can make one work, the small fiberglass handled shovels are often nearly the same weight, and a far better shovel. Takes a tall pack to fit one inside, or need a way to mount it outside the pack. Lowes and Home Depot both sell these, as well as Harbor Freight.

Vacuum bags are probably nearly impossible to tear by hand. I always carry a pocketknife, but keep an extra just to be able to cut the bags open. A 7" knife is big, and not all jobs need a big knife. A small folding knife would be nice to have.

I vacuum seal water, and pre-measured water for freeze dried food.
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 10:50:03 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By motown_steve:
I would add a first aid kit.

Also, if you have to cross a river then I would recommend a change of clothes in a water tight bag. Getting wet in fall or winter is a good way to get hypothermia. Pants, socks, and a shirt. If you get wet then you can change and then build a fire to dry your wet clothes when you stop for the night.


Rope or para cord would be good.


Depending on how rural the area you have to cross is, you might want to add something that you can make an emergency shelter from. You may need improvise something to get out of the weather. Maybe a tarp some rope and a couple of stakes (you could probably improvise those) for a makeshift tent, or top of a lean too.


If you can't have a handgun, then can you have a long gun? A 10/22 or Henry Survival Rifle? Any gun is better than no gun, and if you can cap a couple squirrels or rabbits then your trip might be easier.


Flashlights are always good to have.


Can you throw an extra pair of boots into the truck?




View Quote

Extra boots and food in the truck and maybe at work, depending on the setup. Maybe you can "loan" someone who lives by work something in a small safe.

If you crossing the Potomac, not that many bridges, there are places that rent boats, kayaks, etc, might be useful to know where they are.

Might also have paper maps and explore local back roads so your familiar with the routes home.
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 10:58:19 PM EST
Shit that stays in your vehicle:
Tiny IFAK that could stay with the vehicle, or bring with you.
$2 24pk of grocery store water.
Weather appropriate clothing

Backpack:
Head lamp
flashlight
2x batteries for both of the above.
All three of these phone charging options: 12v car, 120v wall/usb, AA battery
Multitool
50ft Paracord
2-4 small bungee cords.
Duct tape.. 1/4 or 1/2 roll
A small tarp/poncho.
Small survival blanket
Fire starting stuff - bic, two sticks, etc
MRE / boat bars / cliff bars for a day.
Minor First aid (Motrin / athletic tape) to keep your feet from falling apart.
refillable water source (Not a camelback bladder. Think nalgene bottles) or (keep & refill your 12oz water bottles AND fill these)
Map of the area (Mark up rest/aid/stores/public service spots you could stop for help along the route)
Simple compass - If only for cardinal direction if you get turned around. If you are familiar with land nav, bring better stuff.
Sharpie marker & notecards.
1x pair of extra socks.
1 large black trash bag, a few small ziploc bags.
Mace for animals or people.

This sort of mimics what I remember of our army 72hr/assault packing lists. This should fit in a kid's school backpack with room to spare. Don't go too heavy.
Bag all the shit you need dry. Priority is keeping your phone dry, charged then keeping yourself hydrated & mobile for the walk. It's going to blow but you can do the 35ish miles on a day or two worth of food, but you need to keep your feet whole and your body from getting too wet/cold when you stop for breaks.

I'd ditch the fishing stuff. Swap the rambo knife for a multitool.
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 11:10:40 PM EST
Quality flashlight/headlamp.
Power pack for charging your cell phone, even if its a small one.
BIC lighter. Fire sticks are fine, bics are better 99% of the time. Nothing beats starting with actual flame.
Set of head phones for your cell phone if it has an FM radio app.
Compass for your map, and skills to use both.
Ditch the lifestraw, sawyer mini and bladder to store water.
Speaking of water, at least a liter of water in the pack. Bonus if the container fits onto the sawyer.

Tell me more about this river. River crossings are nothing to take lightly. I may consider some kind of inflatable raft.

Others have already chimed in with good ideas.
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 11:17:43 PM EST
Cash
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 11:21:44 PM EST
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Originally Posted By stevem1a:
Cash
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That's a good one. I didn't think to mention it because I usually keep at least $60-$100 in my wallet, but extra cash is a good idea.
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 11:39:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/30/2016 7:42:47 AM EST by tc556guy]
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Originally Posted By JMichael99:

i also considered vacuum sealing the gloves, socks, etc to compress to save space
View Quote

I'm not \a fan of that, because then once you break the seal, you can't re-compress it.
I put stuff in Ziploc bags and suck the air out. protects and organizes the contents against weather when you have to go rummaging through the pack, and you can re-seal the bag to protect the contents.
Link Posted: 11/29/2016 11:44:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tc556guy:

I'm nota fan of that, because then once you break the seal, you can't re-compress it.
I put stuff in Ziploc bags and suck the air out. protects and organizes the contents against weather when you have to go rummaging through the pack, and you can re-seal the bag to protect the contents.
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Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By JMichael99:

i also considered vacuum sealing the gloves, socks, etc to compress to save space

I'm nota fan of that, because then once you break the seal, you can't re-compress it.
I put stuff in Ziploc bags and suck the air out. protects and organizes the contents against weather when you have to go rummaging through the pack, and you can re-seal the bag to protect the contents.

Seconded.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 12:04:21 AM EST
many things already mentioned but here are a few things I keep with me in the truck.

CCW w/ a reload or 2 (holsters)
Duct tape
Small battery powered radio
Cash in multiple denominations ($5 in quarters for vending machines)
Small Sun block
Small Bug repellant
$.99 mosquito headnet from Walmart (trust me on this one of you have to sleep outdoors where there are mosquitos)
chap stick
hydrocortisone (for chaffing if you're doing a lot of walking)
REAL MERINO WOOL socks x 2 pair
3-5 days worth of any prescription meds
quality poncho
wool blanket
Mio Energy Drink liquid
Various tools
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 12:18:34 AM EST
How about a cheap folding bicycle in the SUV? It would save a lot of time and energy and if you get it cheap you won't feel to bad about ditching it at the river if the bridges are no good.

Just brain storming, but a bike isn't that heavy. You could try bringing a long length of paracord and a life vest. Use the vest to float the bike, swim across the river then pull bike over with the paracord from the opposite bank.

Also if you are thinking of doing a river crossing you should give some thought to swim fins and a snorkle. Maybe even a wet suit depending on time of year. Definitely a towel. You could also wear a fife vest or have something like a cut down boogie board/kickboard in your bag to make it float so you can hold onto it for buoyancy and swim using fins.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 12:28:20 AM EST
As previously mentioned, dump the fishing stuff.

Add some lightweight freeze dried food and a micro stove. If you're going to have to pass a river and you need to eat, you can get additional water there.

Good shoes are always a must, and should be part of you're routine. If you must wear something impractical for work, like dress shoes. Put your hiking shoes in your vehicle.

a micro GPS is always nice. an older one works. Make sure you know how to use it. I keep a very old one in my pack with a pack of lithium AA's for it.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 1:57:09 AM EST
am/fm radio
Black and Silver sharpies.
USB drive with important docs and recent photos, encrypted.
Your favorite OTC pain med(s)
TP and/or baby wipes.
USB Charger with appropriate cables
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 4:09:29 AM EST
i can't (legally) have a pistol
View Quote


Can you have a black powder revolver? These are regulated differently from "real" guns by BATFE; perhaps your state will overlook them as well.

Here are some things that most people tend to ignore:

To your list, add a toilet sanitary kit. When camping I like to assemble the "kit" into baggies: a generous wad of TP, plus a couple of Tucs sanitary pads (one to wipe your rear, and one to cleanse your fingers). They can be bought as individual foil-wrapped pads. This will increase your after-dump comfort immensely.

A small bottle of eyewash. If SHTF you may have a lot of ash in the air; cleaning your eyes will be a necessity.

USCG lifeboat ration. This is a large sweet "cookie" that will last a long time. I kept one in my car for years and ate it, it was OK but no culinary masterwork.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 4:17:41 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By unpleasant:


That's a good one. I didn't think to mention it because I usually keep at least $60-$100 in my wallet, but extra cash is a good idea.
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Originally Posted By unpleasant:
Originally Posted By stevem1a:
Cash


That's a good one. I didn't think to mention it because I usually keep at least $60-$100 in my wallet, but extra cash is a good idea.

Keep a portion of it in nickles, dimes, quarters and small bills; it's amazing how much prices go up in an emergency, and mom&pop stores "run out" of small change. Also, being able to buy food, drink, & candy at a vending machine may be a blessing.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 5:44:43 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/30/2016 6:17:13 AM EST by ROCK6]
The 35 miles is a one to two day trek on foot, but is highly dependent on the situation (event, traffic, etc.), weather (probably the most important) and the time of day you depart.

I’m assuming you’ve mapped out a few different routes; best case to worse case. Additionally, you’ve identified all major obstacles whether they are populated areas, rivers or other “choke points” along each route. You’ve identified one major river crossing, but it would be helpful with the details such as how many bridges are available (that will extend your travel distance if the primary is inaccessible) or river details for an actual river crossing; how far across, current, etc. How far from the river is home? This is important if you have to make the rest of the trip on foot.

Along with all the standard “bug out” gear, don’t forget county maps, possibly a police scanner or at least a battery operated AM/FM radio for local intel. Binoculars would assist in reconnoitering from a distance and you should consider both a bicycle and even an inflatable raft as alternate means of transportation if you have to abandon your primary mode of transportation.

Your plan(s) are more important than your gear; start with routes and major obstacles taking into account the seasonal challenges as well.

I still think a self-defensive firearm is important, but only you an make that decision and weigh the risks. I'm in a similar situation and have mitigated as much risk as possible only bending the rules for my situation.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 7:44:14 AM EST
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:

Keep a portion of it in nickles, dimes, quarters and small bills; it's amazing how much prices go up in an emergency, and mom&pop stores "run out" of small change. Also, being able to buy food, drink, & candy at a vending machine may be a blessing.
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Originally Posted By unpleasant:
Originally Posted By stevem1a:
Cash


That's a good one. I didn't think to mention it because I usually keep at least $60-$100 in my wallet, but extra cash is a good idea.

Keep a portion of it in nickles, dimes, quarters and small bills; it's amazing how much prices go up in an emergency, and mom&pop stores "run out" of small change. Also, being able to buy food, drink, & candy at a vending machine may be a blessing.

I'd set a goal of $500 in the pack. I was keeping at least that much in mine til I had to pull it for an emergency last month
I'm working to build back up to that amount
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 8:09:24 AM EST
When it comes to flashlights, many of us grab one, use it briefly to poem around and investigate,navigate,whatever, then put the thing away. Actually having to work with a flashlight for any real length of time will quickly show the limits of a hand held device. After years of camping and hunting, and dressing many deer in the dark, I'd STRONGLY recommend a small LED headlamp. Ideally, it should have multiple illumination levels. I've used small Petzel branded units quite bit and like them, but there are others.... When using one you now have full use of both hands and don't have to fumble a flashlight. Invaluable when changing a tire, pitching a tent, dressing a wound, whatever....

As others have said, CASH. Variety of small bills included. It nearly always works, unlike your debit card.

I'd also recommend a small laminated card that lists phone numbers. Sounds crazy, but do any of us actually know all our phone numbers for loved ones? We rely so much on the programmed autodial on the phone, many of us - me included - don't know numbers for everyone. Listing email addresses might not hurt too. It can be really good to preplan a communications "drop box" too.... If you cannot contact me for an extended period, check with my brother Bill in Wisconsin, or your sister Susan in North Carolina..... You get the idea....

I universally carry a small thermal tarp/blanket thing.. It measures about 5x8, looks like a lightweight tarp with grommeted corners and sides, and has a mylar aluminized side. Use it for everything..... It makes for a bivy, string it up as a tarp, wrap yourself in it as a blanket. Its best use is when hiking and camping. Instead of sitting or laying on damp/wet ground, and becoming wet and soaked that way, I lay on the tarp as a ground sheet. When In Nicaragua on a missions trip and filth was EVEryWHERE, using the thing as a groundsheet kept me out of the shit too (literally).

You cannot have a pistol. Fine. It is what it is. Buy a Ruger 10/22 Take down or some other small rifle or shotgun. Even a single shot 12 or 20 ga shotgun. With a short 20" barrel and the barrel/action separated, its very compact. You don't need to have a full combat load. Even the lowly 10/22 is enough to convince most problems that there is easier prey elsewhere. MD is an issue because of weapons bans and other stupidity. Its not an issue. a garage sale $250 Winchester 94 30-30 is definitely Fudd, and doesn't offend delicate urban democrat sensibilities but remains a highly effective tool. Failing that, you need something. large can of pepperspray, stout walking stick, whatever.. you need some form of weapon. I typically hike with a beautiful five foot carved walnut walking stick. It has brass ferrules top and bottom. While its great as an actual walking stick, and acts like a third leg when crossing streams, muddy trip sections etc, its best use is as a non lethal dog deterrent when someone's unruly mutt is becoming aggressive (which happens almost daily when walking my little dog on local trails).

Asswipe and babywipes. Trust me. If you are living in the field for a few days, you quickly feel nasty. A quick wipe with baby wipes is a huge boost. Asswipe needs no explanation. Store inside freezer type ziplocs.

Some form of water container. A 1L water bottle is fine. A life straw works when you have water here where you are. But if you are moving, you can end up going many hours, or even days, without finding a suitable water source. You can still but shitty water in the container and filter as needed. But you need to be able to haul some water with you.



Link Posted: 11/30/2016 8:17:52 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tc556guy:

I'd set a goal of $500 in the pack. I was keeping at least that much in mine til I had to pull it for an emergency last month
I'm working to build back up to that amount
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Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Originally Posted By unpleasant:
Originally Posted By stevem1a:
Cash


That's a good one. I didn't think to mention it because I usually keep at least $60-$100 in my wallet, but extra cash is a good idea.

Keep a portion of it in nickles, dimes, quarters and small bills; it's amazing how much prices go up in an emergency, and mom&pop stores "run out" of small change. Also, being able to buy food, drink, & candy at a vending machine may be a blessing.

I'd set a goal of $500 in the pack. I was keeping at least that much in mine til I had to pull it for an emergency last month
I'm working to build back up to that amount

PSA: Keep your ca$h in several different places in your pack and about your person (wallet, sox, pocket...). You DON'T want to flash a large wad if there are people around.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 8:26:41 AM EST
Some form of water container. A 1L water bottle is fine. A life straw works when you have water here where you are. But if you are moving, you can end up going many hours, or even days, without finding a suitable water source. You can still but shitty water in the container and filter as needed. But you need to be able to haul some water with you.
View Quote


Universal Water Tap Key:


Inexpensive Multi Tool
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 8:31:15 AM EST
Layers/poncho/shelter. Food, water, large usb power bank to keep coms(cell phone going). Simple knife/multitool. Thats about all I make sure I have for edc. Otherwise it a 72hr bag
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 8:43:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/30/2016 8:56:26 AM EST by tapered-pin]
Originally Posted By JMichael99:
I live in WV and work in MD so 2 things to consider is i can't (legally) have a pistol and i will have to cross a river if bridges are not crossable

Its about a 35mile hike

List:

Quality knife around 7in blade (or more)
Fire starting kit (cotton balls in petroleum jelly with a firestick)
LIfestraw
small fishing kit (couple hooks and small line)
3 day 3500 calorie bars as a last resort backup
Map of the area

Winter gear
gloves
Balaclava
good jacket (would be in my SUV not the bag)
small folding shovel



What else? Or what would you remove?
View Quote

Honestly, if you think you'll need to cross a river, carry a drybag folded up in your pack large enough to put your bag and clothes in. A quality dry bag can also act as a flotation aid in a pinch.
I've got a Sea To Summit Hydraulic dry bag that comes with lashing points and removable straps that would probably be perfect for a scenario you're describing.


while we're talking about you crossing a river, probably a good idea to have a mylar survival blanket and a 20"X36" microfiber pack towel also.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 9:29:06 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:

PSA: Keep your ca$h in several different places in your pack and about your person (wallet, sox, pocket...). You DON'T want to flash a large wad if there are people around.
View Quote

When it comes time to be spending, sure.
Not so worried when it's there waiting for the rainy day
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 10:08:53 AM EST
Which part of Md Mike? I have details routes already planned out with river crossings. Coming from Fredneck or Htown.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 10:09:54 AM EST
Shoes for walking through forest/fields.
A FUCKING BIC LIGHER x2. You don't get points for doing it the hard way. It's not a merit badge.
Cash, extra, not just "what I always carry" a 20, a 10, 5s and 1s. Coins enough for a toll booth, can of soda or candy from a machine, or air from a gas station tire fill station.
Water, you can always drink it before you start walking, should have some in the car anyway. (Do you have a separate car kit? What's in it? How about at your desk, a drawer full of stuff you can select when there is a need will help.) I carry about a dozen bottles of water/gatoraid in my car at all times.
Sunglasses, snow blindness is a bitch.
Cell phone battery booster pack.
Caffeinated mints or gum, or nodoz. (Useful for having in the car anyway.)
Stocking cap
Silver emergency blanket
No lights? Leave batteries separate, pack bats and light in ziplocs. At least one head-lamp.
A "dump pack" ziploc with; more TP than you normally use, wet wipe or two. Maybe another small bottle of water or rubbing alcohol for washing up. (Hint: 5-hour energy drink bottles are strong as fuck and can carry small amounts of all kinds of liquids, powders or solids.) I keep two of these dump kits in my car.

Fuck the fishing kit, you should be able two walk 35 miles on an empty stomach, fishing is wasting time and requires a fire, a cooking pot, etc.

Don't worry too much about a gun. Watch the news, be ready to move out before people are killing each other. Folding Fudd gun (or a Little Badger) if you really want a firearm.

I keep a whole drawer full of foods at work. A couple MREs, microwave soups, jerky, crackers, hard candy, gum, instant coffee, drink mixes, etc. I could easily shove all of that in a plastic bag and have 2 days worth of calories.

Don't overlook train bridges, pipe / utility bridges and dams for getting across water. Also, look UNDER the bridge sometimes there is a walkway that goes all the way across, hidden, and safe from weather.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 11:28:36 AM EST
How's your vision?

I wear contacts daily and can function ok without them. However, I do keep a small bottle of solution and spare lens case in my pack. A spare set of cheap back up glasses is on my to do list.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 11:44:51 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Aikibiker:
How about a cheap folding bicycle in the SUV?
View Quote


This.

Cousin got stranded after 911 and could not get home for days. With bike he would have been home in a few hours.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 11:51:45 AM EST
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Originally Posted By RenegadeX:


This.

Cousin got stranded after 911 and could not get home for days. With bike he would have been home in a few hours.
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Originally Posted By RenegadeX:
Originally Posted By Aikibiker:
How about a cheap folding bicycle in the SUV?


This.

Cousin got stranded after 911 and could not get home for days. With bike he would have been home in a few hours.

My only question would be; how far do you have to go after you cross the river?

If he has 35 miles to cross, and 30 miles before the river with 5 miles after the river then OK. If he has 2 miles before the river and 33 miles after the river then the bicycle is going to be a waste, unless you can cross the river with the bicycle...which may or may not be possible. Personally, I wouldn't risk it since crossing the river is going to be tricky enough without trying to bring a bicycle with you.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 1:27:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/30/2016 1:30:53 PM EST by Plattekill]
If you are trying to get home, not going camping, lose the shovel and fishing stuff.

Add stomach meds for diarrhea and constipation.

And, since you are walking, moleskin, foot powder, medical adhesive tape, extra socks.

Boots/Sneekers/Outerware depending on season. Poncho.

Bike, money, etc.. all above that can HELP, not weigh you down.

Make friends along the way.

Link Posted: 11/30/2016 5:52:38 PM EST
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Some form of water container. A 1L water bottle is fine. A life straw works when you have water here where you are. But if you are moving, you can end up going many hours, or even days, without finding a suitable water source. You can still but shitty water in the container and filter as needed. But you need to be able to haul some water with you.


Universal Water Tap Key:
http://www.sustainablesupply.com/SSC%20Images/C1290951_main-1.jpg?resizeid=10&resizeh=450&resizew=450

Inexpensive Multi Tool

I bought one of these for my bag and then took it out. Based only on one reason. It was solid steel and heavy for what it was. if I could get an alloy one, I would put it back in the bag. Ounces turn to pounds, pounds turn to pain.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 7:44:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/30/2016 7:50:36 PM EST by BlindguyMcSqueezie]
I'll go ahead and drop a little of what I got in my bag. As a practicing trauma emergency room nurse and firefighter EMT, just note that my bag is slightly more medically geared than some but I like to provide help to other members here if I can. But its also important to remember that everyone's bag is going to be different based on their own judgement, life skills, and past experiences. I've been doing bags for years now and they always seem to be different iterations (evolving setups) based on various factors.

Starting with my bag: County Comm Sat Com bag. Used to keep one of my SBRs in it but decided to try it as my go bag as my previous was quite uncomfortable (back pack straps) to wear when full. Its a single wide strap bag and really damn comfortable to carry.

Medical Supplies:

Vacuum sealed IV start kits with a few varying size IV catheters and saline flushes (20s,18s,and a 14 gauge needles respectively)

Vacuum sealed 500mL 0.9% normal saline (went with a 1/2 liter for space concerns)

Israeli Combat dressing of various sizes x2

CAT x 1

Band Aids (don't forget the band aids, that was a fault of my previous bags)

Occlusive dressing x1

Quick-clot

Small sterile water bottle

Non sterile gauze and medical tape packed in with the band aids

Rescue blanket

Loosely packed size L gloves in side pocket

Trauma Shears (on the bag strap as it has Alice loops on it)

Time Out! Pen (used for marking on the skin of patients in surgical settings, looped through the strap's Alice loops)

Navigation:

Paper map of Florida with compass (Rand McNally map from WalMart I think) in a thick industrial zip lock bag

Write in rain book with metal Zebra pen

Signal Mirror (Star flash? I don't know, got it in Army years ago)

Headlamp with spare AAA batts, Surefire handheld with 123 spares

Garmin GPS and batts (foretrex I think)

Food:

MRE chicken with noodles (removed from the original wrapper and vacuum sealed to preserve space)

20oz. bottle of water (hydration and to activate the MRE flameless pack)

P51 opener

Protein bars (vacuum sealed of course)


Misc:

Altoids tin with razor blade, size 4.0 suture kit, little bottle of super glue, small Bic lighter, Energizer 9v industrial, steel wool, matches / striker

Various lengths of para cord

Large Poncho (flecktarn type camo pattern on it, got it on Amazon)

Gloves I got from autozone (Mechanix Multicam print)

Mag fire starter with fire sticks

Probably a few things in there I'm forgetting, sometimes a SIG semi-auto or S&W airweight goes in there depending on my mood. Like I said my loadouts are always evolving. I always consider medications, but at this time I have no RXs prescribed to me and the thought of being harassed by LEO for loose medications makes me not want to do it. Hopefully you're able to get a setup that works for your application. Mine's just set up to hold me over fairly well in an emergency

Link Posted: 11/30/2016 10:20:39 PM EST
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Originally Posted By TURNSKULL:
Which part of Md Mike? I have details routes already planned out with river crossings. Coming from Fredneck or Htown.
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frederick to martinsburg

so i can go through harpers ferry, shep, or hagerstown
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 10:35:48 PM EST
lots of good info here guys. I'm taking notes. I'm also going to add one 2 way radio. the wife will have the other and we will have a prearranged meeting place or if she is unable to travel i can let her know I'm close so i don't get shot coming into the house

my main concerns is weather, but the slight chance of SHTF i want to be prepared

Weather, getting ran off the road or jut running off the road in general and no rescue to come but I'm able to travel on foot. We received 5 feet of snow at my house last year over 2 days so its a concern







Link Posted: 11/30/2016 10:56:18 PM EST
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Originally Posted By tc556guy:

I'm not \a fan of that, because then once you break the seal, you can't re-compress it.
I put stuff in Ziploc bags and suck the air out. protects and organizes the contents against weather when you have to go rummaging through the pack, and you can re-seal the bag to protect the contents.
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Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By JMichael99:

i also considered vacuum sealing the gloves, socks, etc to compress to save space

I'm not \a fan of that, because then once you break the seal, you can't re-compress it.
I put stuff in Ziploc bags and suck the air out. protects and organizes the contents against weather when you have to go rummaging through the pack, and you can re-seal the bag to protect the contents.


The vacuum bags are much more durable. Keep a few extra gallon ziplocs in the bag and you have the more durable vacuum bag for longer term, and ziploc for short term re bagging.

Originally Posted By TURNSKULL:
Which part of Md Mike? I have details routes already planned out with river crossings. Coming from Fredneck or Htown.


There is a railroad track that mostly runs from my work to my house. The first time I looked at a route to walk it for like Plan F, it was very eye opening. There were lots of Y's that had a dead end, but the general direction I needed to go was the dead end. Lots of sidings that appeared to be the main track that would add extra distance for no reason. You need to print maps if you are going to walk a railway. Those trains will keep on moving no matter what happens on the roads, so stay clear of the rails and bridges and keep your ears and eyes open.
Link Posted: 11/30/2016 10:58:42 PM EST
Lots of good info here, the most important part is planning you can use the acronym PACE (Primary, Alternate, Contingency, Emergency) as applicable; The Ranger handbook and FM 3-05.70 are great aids to help you plan for this.

Look at your routes in all possible weather and lighting conditions, that means topo strip maps or recce of them on foot.

Plan what you will do within 24 hours and after 24 hours for both uninjured and injured and make sure who ever needs to know this plan knows it. In this plan include routes, your SOP's for various situations, comm plan (windows, method etc), and movement plan.

You want to get from A to B as fast and as safe as possible so focus on gear/equipment/supplies for staying dry, refueling your body (water should be your primary concern), self aid and staying out of sight or low profile.

Basic survival gear like fire starting, shelter, direction, signaling and water should the core of what you carry. But in your instance look at various evasion stuff out there on the web and YouTube. There is plenty of information on what to carry, how to use it and what to do for blending in etc. Also like someone said a complete water proof pack would be the best bet.

Have you considered caches along the route to lighten your load and once your are in a gun friendly area to pick up a beater pistol?
Link Posted: 12/1/2016 1:37:01 AM EST
Don't have room fora bike? Try a skate board. Buddy of mine broke down out in the sticks and he had his kids skate board in the truck. Said it all came back to him like riding a bike.
And having a pair of these Frogg Toggs will keep you dry and are light.
Link Posted: 12/1/2016 2:44:40 AM EST
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Originally Posted By bigvic:
How's your vision?

I wear contacts daily and can function ok without them. However, I do keep a small bottle of solution and spare lens case in my pack. A spare set of cheap back up glasses is on my to do list.
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Cheap eyewear, fairly durable.

http://www.zennioptical.com/
Link Posted: 12/1/2016 4:23:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/1/2016 4:54:43 AM EST by Aikibiker]
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Originally Posted By motown_steve:


My only question would be; how far do you have to go after you cross the river?

If he has 35 miles to cross, and 30 miles before the river with 5 miles after the river then OK. If he has 2 miles before the river and 33 miles after the river then the bicycle is going to be a waste, unless you can cross the river with the bicycle...which may or may not be possible. Personally, I wouldn't risk it since crossing the river is going to be tricky enough without trying to bring a bicycle with you.
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Yes, but the bicycle will let you try multiple bridges/crossing points before going swimming without wasting a lot of time and energy.
Link Posted: 12/1/2016 7:13:35 AM EST
Even with you saying a pistol is not legal for you to carry..but others have added their opinion on their daily carry....I would say to add a compact pistol cleaning kit.
Link Posted: 12/1/2016 9:33:18 AM EST
If no pistol, what about flare gun and pistol Cal insert? Neither is a gun until it's assembled.
Link Posted: 12/1/2016 11:05:11 AM EST
I think the best way to approach this is to determine what scenarios you are trying to prepare for.

Then, determine what your course of action would be with each, and figure out what you would need to accomplish that goal.

For example. If you have to cross a bridge, that could be an issue in a crisis. If there is a lot of traffic, the bridge may become a choke point and it could take hours for you to cross. In that case, you might want to consider crossing on your own. However, there is no reason to think you would strap on your pack at work and hike to the bridge. Just drive as close as you can to the river, and then pack out from there. That would open up a lot of options, such as a raft. Carrying something like a raft in your car is a lot more feasible than packing it 10 miles to the river.

Try to think outside the box and don't confine yourself to just a "bag". Most likely, no matter what the circumstances are, you will be able to drive part of the way home. And since weight is not much of a concern with a vehicle you can keep a LOT of stuff in your car. You also always have the option to swap stuff out of your "bag" before you leave your vehicle. I don't think there is a "list" that everyone can use for a GHB. It will vary a lot based on what you are trying to do.
Link Posted: 12/1/2016 3:44:30 PM EST
Water, change of socks, some sort of poncho.
Link Posted: 12/1/2016 4:16:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By JMichael99:


frederick to martinsburg

so i can go through harpers ferry, shep, or hagerstown
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Originally Posted By JMichael99:
Originally Posted By TURNSKULL:
Which part of Md Mike? I have details routes already planned out with river crossings. Coming from Fredneck or Htown.


frederick to martinsburg

so i can go through harpers ferry, shep, or hagerstown




Ok coming from FSK side or Golden Miles Side of Fred?

That doesn't seem like much but the Golden Mile side offers far more back roads and ways that avoid the major highways I.E 340 or 70. And those routes would be a dead shot almost or you coming out somewhere between the Ferry and Williamsport given the route I would take. And yes there are some train tracks ( they do Y but the Y's kick you to the Ferry, or She-Town. ) and the rail road bridges that go over the river. No to many shallows in between on the river but you wont have a problem finding a flat bottom boat or canoe. ( if you don't mind taking one haha ). Its a long walk that the trick. Have you walked that distance before with a pack? I have family and friends on that route ( from when i used to work in Fred.) so i had lots of stops and places to supply.

Link Posted: 12/1/2016 5:29:08 PM EST
Cash- certainly but also some American Silver Eagle coins in case cash isn't wanted.
Link Posted: 12/2/2016 9:37:44 AM EST
Most likely thing you are gonna need this time of year is traction. Get a set of chains for the car and some yak trax for your boots. Keep both in the car.

Make sure you have good boots and socks. Anytime I go out in winter I have waterproof boots and 2 pairs of wool socks in the trunk.

Statistically you are more likely to die in a winter storm if you leave your vehicle. In this scenario you should have some blankets, food, water, candles (or some other small form of heat) I have sternos and a sterno stove.

Link Posted: 12/2/2016 4:40:22 PM EST
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Originally Posted By motown_steve:

Seconded.
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Originally Posted By motown_steve:
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By JMichael99:

i also considered vacuum sealing the gloves, socks, etc to compress to save space

I'm nota fan of that, because then once you break the seal, you can't re-compress it.
I put stuff in Ziploc bags and suck the air out. protects and organizes the contents against weather when you have to go rummaging through the pack, and you can re-seal the bag to protect the contents.

Seconded.


There are some "space bags" that you can put stuff in, seal, squeeze the air out of to compress, and unpack/repack w/o a vacuum cleaner. I have had good luck with them for travel purposes, but no experience with them with respect to water proofing.

-shooter
Link Posted: 12/2/2016 6:29:49 PM EST
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Originally Posted By TURNSKULL:




Ok coming from FSK side or Golden Miles Side of Fred?

That doesn't seem like much but the Golden Mile side offers far more back roads and ways that avoid the major highways I.E 340 or 70. And those routes would be a dead shot almost or you coming out somewhere between the Ferry and Williamsport given the route I would take. And yes there are some train tracks ( they do Y but the Y's kick you to the Ferry, or She-Town. ) and the rail road bridges that go over the river. No to many shallows in between on the river but you wont have a problem finding a flat bottom boat or canoe. ( if you don't mind taking one haha ). Its a long walk that the trick. Have you walked that distance before with a pack? I have family and friends on that route ( from when i used to work in Fred.) so i had lots of stops and places to supply.
View Quote


Golden mile. Beside famous daves.

Most I've walked in one day was around 10 miles with a pack in Utah.

If I went up to Hagerstown I have one stop I could make near the outlets. I have a friend who lives there. Other than that one I'm friendless lol
Link Posted: 12/2/2016 6:37:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/2/2016 6:37:58 PM EST by therealdonjohnson]
Snickers, youre not you when youre hungry.
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