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Posted: 6/13/2016 1:38:39 PM EDT
If you had a large water storage tank - say 250 gallons or so - where would you rather store it?

Here are the caveats:

Basement
- no sunlight
- stored on concrete foundation
- most of basement (but not storage area) climate controlled
- to get tank outside for service/cleaning requires relocation of some shelving w/other storage items
- a major leak would reach finished, carpeted areas

Garage
- some sunlight (tank is black), as in up to 5 hours once/twice a week (weekends)
- stored on concrete foundation
- no climate control, but temps range from 50s-80s most of the year
- tank easily accessed for service, cleaning or refilling
- a major leak would have little effect except on a few carboard boxes
Link Posted: 6/13/2016 1:46:00 PM EDT
Why?
Link Posted: 6/13/2016 2:13:29 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By widerstehe:
Why?
View Quote

Why store water?
Link Posted: 6/13/2016 5:50:16 PM EDT
I store mine outside in the blue 55 gal barrels, in direct sunlight. No issues. I'd go garage but I don't have the space.
Link Posted: 6/13/2016 7:27:49 PM EDT
If I am worried about opspec, basement. Don't care about opspec, garage.

My two cents
Link Posted: 6/13/2016 7:32:41 PM EDT
What is the container made of?

There can be a concern of chemicals leaching into the tank, depending on the material, from the concrete floor.

Might want to consider placing the container on some lumber on the concrete floor.

But, I am no expert, by any means.
Link Posted: 6/13/2016 9:12:38 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By bowmanch:
If I am worried about opspec, basement. Don't care about opspec, garage.

My two cents
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I have drums of water in my basement. Couldn't hide them all when the AC repair man was over. "so what's with the drums of water? Are you a doomsday prepper?" me: "I just like to stay hydrated". From opsec perspective I would have been better off with them out of sight in the garage.
Link Posted: 6/13/2016 10:39:19 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By boomer_45:
What is the container made of?

There can be a concern of chemicals leaching into the tank, depending on the material, from the concrete floor.

Might want to consider placing the container on some lumber on the concrete floor.

But, I am no expert, by any means.
View Quote

Something like this

Link Posted: 6/14/2016 1:45:08 AM EDT
We have a pretty good source for 275gl and 330gl IBC totes that are drinking water safe for about $100-$130ea. I have four 275's for water and a 330 full of diesel that are covered with these "pallet tarps" when covered, they look like a pallet of blocks or concrete, benign. The water tanks, I'll drain and refill every year with fresh softened and filtered water. The last change I did, I found a small green spot in one tank only. These sit outside all year long. I still pressure wash and use zep degreaser inside before refill.

The IBC tanks have a bottom drain that I purchased 1" npt adapters for and hooked a irrigation booster pump to with a check valve on the output side and ran a garden hose from it to my backyard spigot (opened of course)t. This setup provided 45psi of "on demand" pressure to our house.

We had nine people in our house last Thanksgiving and our well motor sucked sand and cooked. We ran like this for four days and used 2 IBC totes (550gl) in that time. I did not stress our guests with rationing, so use was a little high LOL

http://www.ebay.com/itm/3ZRU1-Pallet-Cover-Tarpaulin-48x48x48In-/331331107016?hash=item4d24df78c8:g:KksAAOSwFEFXJNSc
Link Posted: 6/14/2016 9:05:26 AM EDT
Basement with a cover that hides it a catch basin with sump for leaks and a pump tied to house for convenience in an emergency.

Garage fast and easy.
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 5:10:25 PM EDT
If I had an easy way to deal with pumping the water in and out then the basement is good.

If I am emptying it using buckets or something and filling with garden hose run all around house and into basement, probably garage.

I have some rv type hoses of short lengths, safe for drinking water.

I have something that goes on most kitchen sink facets, or most big faucets if your laundery room or mud room has a big sink, so I got water from a few sources.

If there is a drain in the basement, siphon that sucker empty there and really with a little floor space it should not be hard to rinse and clean it even if you are wanting to slosh it around or something.

I do kind of agree with something to detect a leak and a sump pump to handle the leak if you are away from home at the time.

My problem would be eventually I would have both due to space issues.

I am currently on a big kick to stop having stuff where it might be seen. So the garage door up, will that be out in the open all the time? Course then I would build something for camo I guess.
Link Posted: 6/16/2016 9:23:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/16/2016 9:26:30 AM EDT by Lowdown3]
Garage may allow you to plumb into the house if necessary. A small 12v RV "on demand" pump could provide some pressure from the tank. In the basement it would have to work harder and have more of a time pushing water up to elevation.

Ideally you'd want the tank above where you might need the water- I.,e side of a hill, elevated area, etc. In other words, you could get SOME water pressure with this method.

If it's just a house in suburbia, that probably isn't an option however.

Still, you may be able in a pinch to use the tank and a small on demand pump to put pressure into the system if necessary. For something less than permanent you could probably tie into your washing machine plumbing connection. Have a shut off valve (or a one way valve) on the current incoming side of your water line coming into the house. If necessary, you could have somewhat normal water pressure in the house via what I'm describing.
Link Posted: 6/16/2016 10:19:14 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By biere:
If I had an easy way to deal with pumping the water in and out then the basement is good.

If I am emptying it using buckets or something and filling with garden hose run all around house and into basement, probably garage.

If there is a drain in the basement, siphon that sucker empty there and really with a little floor space it should not be hard to rinse and clean it even if you are wanting to slosh it around or something.

I do kind of agree with something to detect a leak and a sump pump to handle the leak if you are away from home at the time.

I am currently on a big kick to stop having stuff where it might be seen. So the garage door up, will that be out in the open all the time? Course then I would build something for camo I guess.
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Originally Posted By biere:
If I had an easy way to deal with pumping the water in and out then the basement is good.

If I am emptying it using buckets or something and filling with garden hose run all around house and into basement, probably garage.

If there is a drain in the basement, siphon that sucker empty there and really with a little floor space it should not be hard to rinse and clean it even if you are wanting to slosh it around or something.

I do kind of agree with something to detect a leak and a sump pump to handle the leak if you are away from home at the time.

I am currently on a big kick to stop having stuff where it might be seen. So the garage door up, will that be out in the open all the time? Course then I would build something for camo I guess.

All good points. No drain in the basement. We have a sump for the bathroom down there, but not looking to install a new one just for water storage emergencies.

I bought enough quality hose to reach from our spigots (front/back of house) to the tank through the basement windows on the side of the house, but still a PITA. I do OPSEC for much more valuable stuff in the garage and generally keep the door closed unless my wife is working in the garden, so we might be able to disguise it somewhat. We live in a tiny neighborhood in upper/middle class area (new home subdivision next to us is $600k homes), so we don't get much traffic and crime is very low.

Originally Posted By Lowdown3:
Garage may allow you to plumb into the house if necessary. A small 12v RV "on demand" pump could provide some pressure from the tank. In the basement it would have to work harder and have more of a time pushing water up to elevation.

Ideally you'd want the tank above where you might need the water- I.,e side of a hill, elevated area, etc. In other words, you could get SOME water pressure with this method.

If it's just a house in suburbia, that probably isn't an option however.

Still, you may be able in a pinch to use the tank and a small on demand pump to put pressure into the system if necessary. For something less than permanent you could probably tie into your washing machine plumbing connection. Have a shut off valve (or a one way valve) on the current incoming side of your water line coming into the house. If necessary, you could have somewhat normal water pressure in the house via what I'm describing.

Yeah, we're in suburbia and honestly, the intent is not to provide pressurized water to our house plumbing but a storage option for additional potable water in the event of an emergency. We keep at least 30 days of water on hand, and this would extend us to more than 3-4 months. Any water from the tank would be filtered through a big berkey if it was used for cooking or consumption.
Link Posted: 6/16/2016 3:16:13 PM EDT
I would go garage then.

I grew up in a house with a basement, unfinished but we had a wood working shop and washer and dryer down there and what not so were down there a lot.

Drain in basement was needed a few times when water heater had issue or washer had issues or water pipes had issues.

I don't really trust a sump pump, needs a battery backup and even then it can die and you need a 2nd one to make sure one will work.

If you actually have the space in the garage, I never have space in the garage if I had a garage, then it makes the most sense for times you want to drain it and refill it and what not.

I mostly consider it a pain to run hose around the house and through a window, it is good to be able to do so but I just don't like doing it very much.

I don't really think the temps or light matter all that much, compared to a crack in the tank in the basement being a bigger deal.

Link Posted: 6/16/2016 3:38:04 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By biere:
I would go garage then.

I grew up in a house with a basement, unfinished but we had a wood working shop and washer and dryer down there and what not so were down there a lot.

Drain in basement was needed a few times when water heater had issue or washer had issues or water pipes had issues.

I don't really trust a sump pump, needs a battery backup and even then it can die and you need a 2nd one to make sure one will work.

If you actually have the space in the garage, I never have space in the garage if I had a garage, then it makes the most sense for times you want to drain it and refill it and what not.

I mostly consider it a pain to run hose around the house and through a window, it is good to be able to do so but I just don't like doing it very much.

I don't really think the temps or light matter all that much, compared to a crack in the tank in the basement being a bigger deal.

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Makes sense, thanks for the advice.
Link Posted: 6/16/2016 4:20:21 PM EDT
I'm going to go with basement.

Even in the non climate controlled area, you're going to have less temperature variation and nearly zero chance of freezing. Given the choice of drinking warm water and cool water in the summertime, I'll take cool water every time. The thermal mass in the basement might also moderate temperature fluctuations.

Depending on the tank, sunlight (UV) can affect longevity.

Wherever you store it, don't forget about the possibility of condensation on the tank surface that might rot / rust nearby items or structural members.
Link Posted: 6/17/2016 8:36:08 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By boomer_45:
What is the container made of?

There can be a concern of chemicals leaching into the tank, depending on the material, from the concrete floor.

Might want to consider placing the container on some lumber on the concrete floor.

But, I am no expert, by any means.
View Quote


I knew someone would post it
Link Posted: 6/17/2016 11:40:50 AM EDT
Would this be for drinking water, or general use?

If it's for drinking you might consider multiple smaller containers so you can move them around more easily and rotate the water more easily.

For general use, (flushing toilets etc.) something large would be great.
Link Posted: 6/17/2016 2:40:14 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Urban_Viking:
Would this be for drinking water, or general use?

If it's for drinking you might consider multiple smaller containers so you can move them around more easily and rotate the water more easily.

For general use, (flushing toilets etc.) something large would be great.
View Quote

Both. We have about 30-40 gallons in bottled water. Were that to run out, we'd switch to the storage container, filtering as noted above.

As much water as could be collected elsewhere would be for non-drinking, non-cooking uses. I'm thinking worst case scenario, and we're unable to scavenge much/any additional water.

I also have a 55 gallon drum to fill.
Link Posted: 6/17/2016 9:14:44 PM EDT
Keep a few 330 totes full at the barn (livestock) and a few 55gal full in the basement. Change water 2x per year same as smoke detector batts/clock change. Have gens and a well too.
Link Posted: 6/17/2016 9:25:03 PM EDT
Garage. Because gravity.
Link Posted: 6/18/2016 3:58:52 PM EDT
The biggest downside I can see to garage is heat. Warm water is a much better environment for microorganisms to grow in, typically the warmer the better up to a point. Properly treated and rotated, that shouldn't be a big concern, though.
Link Posted: 6/19/2016 9:06:09 AM EDT
Well if I lived in Ga. Garage for the convenience of cleaning and refill.

I live in the north so the basement would make sense to avoid freezing issues.

That would be my biggest environmental effect on plans.
Link Posted: 6/19/2016 11:16:48 AM EDT
OK, I can see nobody here has a clue.

Water Tanks, we've used a 3,000 black poly tank for the past 20 years, it went thru a wild fire 5 years ago and survived, whereas the pumps did not.

Clean it out? It's a little slimy inside but that's just algea eating the bacteria, not a problem that's how most of your waste treatment plant purify the water.

I run it thru filters for drinking but that's it.

Clean it if you feel better about it, but it won't make it better water.

Rancher
Link Posted: 6/19/2016 11:30:22 AM EDT
Cases of bottled and drums for drinking. 40,000 gallon pool for flushing. Going to get a few totes for cushion and if needed shut off water main and water valve in crawlspace, demand pump for back feeding. Could build or buy a large distillation set up for pool water I guess.
Link Posted: 6/19/2016 12:22:36 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By boomer_45:
What is the container made of?

There can be a concern of chemicals leaching into the tank, depending on the material, from the concrete floor.

Might want to consider placing the container on some lumber on the concrete floor.

But, I am no expert, by any means.
View Quote


I've no idea where the idea that "chemicals" will leach into a plastic tank come from. I suspect it's like the old wives tale about setting a battery on a cement floor. As to the sunlight issue, if it isn't opaque the sun will have no effect except to heat the water.

Now, you must understand except for highly purified water all sources will contain some level of biological activity. If you think using a non opaque vessel will prevent the growth of undesirable biologicals you need to understand that some don't require sunlight to thrive.
And some of those that breed without sunlight can be much more undesirable than the green growth seen in opaque vessels.

If you are going to store water, regardless of container, the key is proper chlorination and cycling the water every six months. It's a bit of work, but during a situation where you are relying on that stored water the illness' from improperly stored water are the very last thing you want to deal with.

Imagine a situation where the water you drink results in either vomiting or diarrhea. These both lead to dehydration which would require more intake of your contaminated water. You get the picture.
Link Posted: 6/20/2016 10:42:47 AM EDT
Do your winter temps ever get below freezing?
Link Posted: 6/20/2016 12:27:46 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By madmacs69:
Do your winter temps ever get below freezing?
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Mine? Rarely. My garage rarely gets below 50s.
Link Posted: 6/20/2016 12:47:01 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By azrancher:
OK, I can see nobody here has a clue.

Water Tanks, we've used a 3,000 black poly tank for the past 20 years, it went thru a wild fire 5 years ago and survived, whereas the pumps did not.

Clean it out? It's a little slimy inside but that's just algea eating the bacteria, not a problem that's how most of your waste treatment plant purify the water.

I run it thru filters for drinking but that's it.

Clean it if you feel better about it, but it won't make it better water.

Rancher
View Quote

I have 3 3500gal tanks in rotation for the last ten years and use them on there own pump for watering so the water is replaced constantly.
I do run it through a filter when I run it into the house and the filters never pick up much of anything.
I also have a 20gal pressure tank on my RO so my coffee water always stays in good supply.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 5:50:22 PM EDT
Basement, in a containment box or at least a pan with one of those alarms that go off if they detect moisture.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 6:55:06 PM EDT
Garage for sure. Biggest risk is a leak, and that SUCKS.
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