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Posted: 9/11/2009 6:33:51 PM EST
Guns seem to hold their value OK, ammo go has gone up up up, gold and silver are the old stand bys. What about musical instruments? How well do they hold their value during hard times?
Link Posted: 9/11/2009 6:54:45 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/11/2009 6:55:59 PM EST by Lympago]



There hard enough to sell now. Once people are first and foremost concerned about the next meal is and safety for their family, they're not going to be thinking of buying or trading for musical instruments. What they will bring is what they bring now. Some pause to the stress of the time and a way for people to take their minds off things for a moment.


Link Posted: 9/11/2009 7:30:22 PM EST
Most of the pawn shops I've been in had quite a few instruments. I'd guess they don't have much value when people get short of money.
Link Posted: 9/11/2009 7:32:23 PM EST
The value of musical instruments goes down the toilet. Unless you have something special someone really wants.

I have 3 vintage Marshall amps that would each fetch a few hundred or more less than they would have 1, 2 or 3 etc.. years ago.

Prices for Guitars and Amps are nowhere what they where in 2006/2007 even.

as far as what I am seeing now compared to then when I was looking to buy.
Link Posted: 9/11/2009 7:40:39 PM EST
EVERY ONE WANTED TO JOIN THE MUSICAL QUARTET WHEN THE TITANIC WAS GOING DOWN.

Link Posted: 9/12/2009 12:25:16 PM EST
Originally Posted By Isenhelm:
The value of musical instruments goes down the toilet. Unless you have something special someone really wants.

I have 3 vintage Marshall amps that would each fetch a few hundred or more less than they would have 1, 2 or 3 etc.. years ago.

Prices for Guitars and Amps are nowhere what they where in 2006/2007 even.

as far as what I am seeing now compared to then when I was looking to buy.


Pretty much what I expected, but I don't keep track of the market at all. I have what I need now (Taylor guitar, Deering banjo), but I've been considering picking up another guitar or two and maybe a mandolin. A friend swears that instruments hold their value, but I had my doubts. Sounds like now is a good time to pick up some nice hardware for cheap.


Link Posted: 9/12/2009 6:18:21 PM EST
Yeah, its just the fluctuation, it in the down side right now, when it gos back up items might see increases.

Link Posted: 9/13/2009 3:51:40 PM EST
5 years after the zombie apocalypse they might be rare and highly valued - IF there are people who can play them, and IF there are places with enough normalcy to have time to actually spend a significant amount of money on entertainment.

Otherwise, no, its a thingy that makes sounds. Explain how that is supposed to put food on someone's table.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:19:04 AM EST
I think that having a musical instrument that you can play would be invaluable for morale, but I wouldn't consider it an investment, per se.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 5:03:49 AM EST
geez.. Its hard to pin this one down. I'll take my best wild assed guess at it...

There are some things which are true necessities, thing which are absolutely necessary for life. Water, air, food, warmth, shelter, medicines. I can see these things having lasting value, and increasing in value during times of scarcity.

There are some things that are luxuries. These things tend to go one of two ways. They either become worth very very little, or, in some rare cases, become quite valuable. Examples: TV's. Worth a fair bit now, but I strongly suspect that in an environment without power (and without programming) these will plummet in value. Same for the various prints and originals hanging on my walls, or the crystal and china in the cabinets. Our top-of-the-line Stickley furniture is worth a small fortune, but its likely firewood under most stressful conditions.

Other luxuries skyrocket in value. Cigarettes. Booze. Chocolate. Ever hear the stories about what a pair of silk stockings would get you in Europe during WWII?

I suspect the value of a particular luxury depends on the state of the economy (is is wartime-rationingin London type bad or is it we-are-starving-in Leningrad bad?). It would also depend on that item's ability to 'improve life". I'd argue that music can be a great comforter. However, I have great concerns about its usefullness. We are, by and large, not a population that really is into folk and bluegrass (I like em). Somebody picking on a guitar isn't necessarily going to dramatically comfort many people with far different musical tastes. Furthermore, the value of the guitar is largely depended on the players skill. My wife has a beautiful Gibson Lc-2 guitar with a gorgeous flame maple back, adirondack spruce top, great inlays and an unbelievable crisp, ringing tone that is simply amazing. We paid a lot of money for it. I know that the guitar is about item number 1432 on our list of items we "need" . In a stressed out economic situation I figure we'd be lucky to get 1/10th its value....

True luxury items are purchased by the affluent, or "collected" in times of prosperity. When prosperity ends the availble pool of people with excess cash(or other barter items) for luxuries is dramatically reduced. I cannot picture most musical instruments (luxuries) going up in value.

Fro
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 5:57:48 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 12:12:28 AM EST
Music, however, will always be a part of human life. Imagine a world with no recorded music, only what you can make. Songs will continue. It is unlikely, though, that many will barter food for flutes, or ammo for harmonicas, or guns for guitars.

There will be survivors with musical talent. There will always be music.

GL
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