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6/25/2018 7:04:05 PM
Posted: 7/24/2018 3:53:41 PM EDT
Do any of you have or use a GPS or something to log rides and look at them later???

I have different units, but not really sure how to do it on any of them.

We do a lot of trail and back gravel roads riding on our Polaris Ranger, this last weekend we rode 94+ mile over the day... No real destination, just out enjoying the country with my girl and a few friends......

I downloaded an Polaris App that lets you do some logging, but I was looking to see if and what others did...
Link Posted: 7/24/2018 5:41:14 PM EDT
If you have a smartphone - google fit or strava will do the job for you. I only carry my garmin on longer/more remote treks - where the ruggedness could be vital. For close in hikes, bikes, etc, the phone does a better job.
Link Posted: 7/24/2018 8:53:25 PM EDT
There are a few good apps out there and some even already have trail maps. If using Android check out Backcountry navigator. iOS check out motionX and for both you can download Polaris ride command
Link Posted: 7/28/2018 1:20:00 PM EDT
I've had several. My current one is the Garmin 64. I've also had the Vista, Oregon, and asteo 320 which is like the 62 only it can utilize the tracking collars for my dogs if I chose.

If you get one you need to practice using it before you need to use it, they are great but have little quirks that you need to get used to, they are merely a tool. I also have a compass with me to confirm the electronic compass of the GPS. Where I am there are no landmarks to see so a map and compass is almost useless. If something happens to my GPS I can also use the compass to know what general direction to go to to hit a road or known trail.

I prefer my handhelds to a phone because the handheld is waterproof and sturdy, plus I can carry extra batteries and easily change them. I'm also used to the software.

The instruction manual that comes with them only tell you how the functions operate, they don't tell use how to actually use the functions when you are out. This seems like a small thing but I've seen people struggle with this.

The settings seem complicated at first but are actually quite intuitive once you fiddle with it for awhile. You have the ability to change data fields, change the page orders, etc and you can change the way the map displays and the units it uses for distance, coordinates, etc.

Once I get to where I am going I reset my trip data. I clear my track log and trip data so everything is nice fresh and clean on the screen. I mark my vehicle.

It's good to waypoint things along the way, that way if you change your mind you can do a "go-to" to one of those you marked.

Sometimes it's better to do that instead of simply following your track. Reason being is that accuracy can be off by a few feet and if you are in thick underbrush it's easier to watch your go-to arrow and pick your way along the clearest path.

I have mapped entire hunt clubs with my GPS. While everyone else is staying on main paths ive been able to bushwhack and find the uncrowded spots. I've also been able to find deer and hunting dogs at night in thick overgrown woods with my headlamps and gps while others sit in their truck with their thumb up their ass waving around their beeping radio wave detector that only gives the general direction of their dogs, not that it matters because they aren't going to go in the woods anyway.

I like keeping track of how far I hike in what looks more or less like a jungle. When I rode my quad I had it mounted to the handlebars.

Oh, you don't need to get special Garmin maps, you can get free topo ones from Here

This was a hot day, it was 102 degrees! I had a camelbak of ice water.

Attachment Attached File

Attachment Attached File


In a lot of forums when this topic comes up the knee jerk response is "use a map and compass, it's the only way". I suspect a lot of those people never get off the couch. They never actually talk about the different compasses, like they have never used one and don't know there is an actual difference. Or that a compass can break as well. Or that if it's dark or no elevation that map and compass is useless.

They are both tools used in different ways. I recommend getting both but I mostly use my GPS, it's just because of my unique style of the outdoors. My favorite compass is either the brunton truarc 3 or the suunto m3 because of the global needle.

I know this is a long winded response but hopefully someone will find the info useful. Handhelds have really enriched my outdoor activities. You just have to learn to use them and know their limitations.
Link Posted: 7/28/2018 1:40:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/28/2018 1:43:46 PM EDT by Foxxz]
I use a smartphone app called gps logger. It simply logs and generates two common file types for storing a gps trail. You can import it into google maps or several different websites or programs for analysis and sharing. I use it to log my horse rides.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=eu.basicairdata.graziano.gpslogger

Heres a website with one of my rides
http://utrack.crempa.net/report/saved_report.php?ident=dee4d53f6bce050ed7e7fdc966947399&lang=en
Link Posted: 8/1/2018 4:25:38 PM EDT
We ride our Rzrs all over the eastern part of the country. If we are on designated trails we use the Polaris Ride Command App. Usually has all the trails marked and we just follow along. If we're boondocking, as it sounds like you are, we use MotionX. I really have no complaints about either.
Link Posted: 8/1/2018 9:23:04 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gitarmac:
I've had several. My current one is the Garmin 64. I've also had the Vista, Oregon, and asteo 320 which is like the 62 only it can utilize the tracking collars for my dogs if I chose.

If you get one you need to practice using it before you need to use it, they are great but have little quirks that you need to get used to, they are merely a tool. I also have a compass with me to confirm the electronic compass of the GPS. Where I am there are no landmarks to see so a map and compass is almost useless. If something happens to my GPS I can also use the compass to know what general direction to go to to hit a road or known trail.

I prefer my handhelds to a phone because the handheld is waterproof and sturdy, plus I can carry extra batteries and easily change them. I'm also used to the software.

The instruction manual that comes with them only tell you how the functions operate, they don't tell use how to actually use the functions when you are out. This seems like a small thing but I've seen people struggle with this.

The settings seem complicated at first but are actually quite intuitive once you fiddle with it for awhile. You have the ability to change data fields, change the page orders, etc and you can change the way the map displays and the units it uses for distance, coordinates, etc.

Once I get to where I am going I reset my trip data. I clear my track log and trip data so everything is nice fresh and clean on the screen. I mark my vehicle.

It's good to waypoint things along the way, that way if you change your mind you can do a "go-to" to one of those you marked.

Sometimes it's better to do that instead of simply following your track. Reason being is that accuracy can be off by a few feet and if you are in thick underbrush it's easier to watch your go-to arrow and pick your way along the clearest path.

I have mapped entire hunt clubs with my GPS. While everyone else is staying on main paths ive been able to bushwhack and find the uncrowded spots. I've also been able to find deer and hunting dogs at night in thick overgrown woods with my headlamps and gps while others sit in their truck with their thumb up their ass waving around their beeping radio wave detector that only gives the general direction of their dogs, not that it matters because they aren't going to go in the woods anyway.

I like keeping track of how far I hike in what looks more or less like a jungle. When I rode my quad I had it mounted to the handlebars.

Oh, you don't need to get special Garmin maps, you can get free topo ones from Here

This was a hot day, it was 102 degrees! I had a camelbak of ice water.

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/7067/gps-621865.JPG
https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/7067/IMG_20180716_175615983-800x600-621866.JPG

In a lot of forums when this topic comes up the knee jerk response is "use a map and compass, it's the only way". I suspect a lot of those people never get off the couch. They never actually talk about the different compasses, like they have never used one and don't know there is an actual difference. Or that a compass can break as well. Or that if it's dark or no elevation that map and compass is useless.

They are both tools used in different ways. I recommend getting both but I mostly use my GPS, it's just because of my unique style of the outdoors. My favorite compass is either the brunton truarc 3 or the suunto m3 because of the global needle.

I know this is a long winded response but hopefully someone will find the info useful. Handhelds have really enriched my outdoor activities. You just have to learn to use them and know their limitations.
View Quote
How do you like that GPSMAP 64?

I've got one coming for my ATV. Got a RAM mount for it already.
Link Posted: 8/1/2018 9:36:01 PM EDT
I love it, hadn't had a problem. I use the SE US topo map from gpsfilesdepot. I use rechargeable eneloops.
Link Posted: 8/1/2018 9:45:16 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gitarmac:
I love it, hadn't had a problem. I use the SE US topo map from gpsfilesdepot. I use rechargeable eneloops.
View Quote
Appreciate the maps link.

How long run time do you get from a set of eneloops?
Link Posted: 8/2/2018 7:10:44 AM EDT
I never have them in more than 8 hours or so, I swap them out for fresh ones each time I go out. Back when I used my astro 320 to track dogs (and ride my ATV) the GPS was on for longer and I would swap them out one time when they got kind of low. They have never leaked in my devices, unlike regular alkalines.

I have a whole bunch of eneloops so it's not an issue. I use them in my headlamps as well and other things. I always have spares with me, sometimes I throw alkalines in my pack if I don't think I have enough of the others.

We used to go to the club every weekend and stay the weekend, I could get batteries off the shelf if I forgot mine.
Link Posted: 8/2/2018 11:14:00 PM EDT
I just got a Garmin GPSMAP 64st. Been playing with it and I like it. I used to have a Garmin Etrex Vista which I liked but it wasn't nearly as useful as this one with the built in maps. I'll get some of the downloadable maps soon and make it even more useful.

Got it for $200 off ebay. It was "used" but looked brand new without a scratch in the original box.
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