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Posted: 7/21/2008 4:47:09 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 4:48:05 AM EST by ireload]
Has anyone here ever used them as pots to plant veggies? I have several of them.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:50:36 AM EST
they'll work...shouldnt hurt
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:54:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 4:55:00 AM EST by ireload]
That's what i'm thinking Protus. Just needed a second opinion. A good cleaning would be in order. They would be mainly for tomato plants.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:28:50 AM EST
They work fine!

Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:40:25 AM EST
I'm currently using two for cherry tomatoes on my back deck - no problems at all. Just clean them out.

Only problem I find with buckets in general is accumulation of water in the bottom. I hate drilling a couple drainage holes in them because they can be used for other things when not being used as planters.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 7:11:50 AM EST
I would drill 3 or 4, 1/2" holes in the bottom. Put 2" gravel in it and enjoy.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 7:35:10 AM EST

joint compound buckets have grown much of the country's supply of award winning indoor plants. They are great.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:34:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 5:35:27 PM EST by SHADI]
Joint compound, like you would use to tape and bed dry wall?

Or joint compound as in the stuff used on drill pipe threads in the oil and gas industry? (some of which contains up to 60% lead by weight)

I hope your talking about the first option
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:58:53 PM EST

1. I've done the 1/2" holes at the bottom already. Cleaned out the buckets the other day. The gravel idea is something that has not crossed my mind but willing to try.

2. It is the joint compound used for drywall the buckets contained.


Thank you for all the input. I have 6 baby tomatoes that will be needing pots in the near future.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 1:50:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2008 1:51:05 AM EST by ranchhand]

Originally Posted By globe512:
joint compound buckets have grown much of the country's supply of award winning indoor plants. They are great.



Pics?
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 2:53:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By ireload:
That's what i'm thinking Protus. Just needed a second opinion. A good cleaning would be in order. They would be mainly for tomato plants.


Joint compound is basically lime and perlite with a little palygorskite all of which are used as soil conditioners. I would'nt worry about cleaning too much. If you insist, the easiest way to clean mud buckets is to fill them with water, let them sit overnight and lightly wipe with a sponge the next day, quick rinse with a hose and air dry. Any residue will wipe off with a dry cloth. I used to clean 20 at a time and sell them at a flea market for $2/piece.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 8:41:39 AM EST
I currently have those 5 gallon recycled joint compound containers planted on my porch with tomatoes, corn, watermelons, canteloupe, squash, zucchini, pole beans, bush beans, basil, and oregano. This fall I'll plant collards, lettuce spinach and whatever else i can think of. I'll see if i can post pics later. But really, this is the best way I've found to keep bugs off them along with the critters... All the buckets are on the porch!
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