Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
User Panel

Posted: 2/15/2017 5:21:18 PM EDT
Updated the Truck's First Aid Kit. Please note that this First Aid System was designed primarily for Shooting Range, Camping, and ATV outings, as well as other events.



















Link Posted: 2/15/2017 6:06:12 PM EDT
[#1]
No quick clot, or did I miss it?
Link Posted: 2/15/2017 6:53:38 PM EDT
[#2]
Tagged
Link Posted: 2/15/2017 7:03:34 PM EDT
[#3]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
No quick clot, or did I miss it?
View Quote

Based on the reports/videos I saw, I chose Celox over Quick Clot (see Moderate to Severe Bleeding section for Celox items).
Link Posted: 2/15/2017 9:13:52 PM EDT
[#4]
Quite a kit.

Make sure family knows how to treat you.
Hands-on experience goes along way too.
Link Posted: 2/15/2017 9:50:13 PM EDT
[#5]
My biggest concern is keeping everything fresh or at least in usable condition through the freeze and hot of the different seasons.

How long is a FAK good for when the inside truck temps get +120 and freeze - 0 ??
Link Posted: 2/15/2017 10:55:39 PM EDT
[#6]
Wow, that's a lot of stuff.  I’m going to assuming you have at least some training?  If not that is the first plae you need to start.  No idea to what level so I’ll just toss out some of my thoughts- apologies if you're a trauma doc or something.  I’ve never owned a Littman Cardiology because all of my stethoscopes seem to take a beating or some wanker steals them; they also need to be serviced periodically.  I usually use the Littman Master Classic or a Classic II (ADC stethoscopes suck in my opinion).  

The first thing I would recommend is taking the batteries out of the stuff that requires them unless you are very methodical about periodically inspecting them or use them on a regular basis.  I bought a couple of those clear tubes that hold batteries and I just rubber band them to each piece of equipment that needs them.  It adds a minute to your times and takes up a little bit more room but the changing temp cycles, especially the high heat in a vehicle during summer, just kills batteries.  I've had Energizers leak in the Pelican light used in a corpsman kit and the ophthalmoscope.  I managed to clean the scope but the acid messed up the plastic in the Pelican light which is also used in the laryngoscope handle.  Just my two cents worth.

Other random thoughts:
Advil and Motrin are both ibuprofen.
Zinc oxide?  It’s primarily used for sunblock but maybe that’s why it’s in there.  
Chapstick will melt and make a mess, get something in a tube with a screw on top like the Carmex.
The surgical masks seem redundant when you have N95 masks
Disposable cpr mask are redundant when you have another barrier device that should work better (never used that one).
Unless the XL gloves fit you they will be baggy and hard to work in; the fingertips get caught on everything and in the way in my experience.  I’d rather wear gloves one size too small than one size too large.  I’d split your gloves inventory into some mediums, some large and some xl if you think anyone else may be using your kit.  
I prefer a small tube of the triple antibiotic with pain reliever to the non-pain relief formula.  Nice for kids and those small painful cracks I always get near my finger nails in the winter when my hands dry out.  Be aware that some folks are allergic to the neomycin in triple antibiotics and some docs are now recommending simply using bacitracin.
You’ve got a lot of bandaging supplies such as specialized stuff, i.e. knuckle bandages and tegaderms, that can be covered by using larger stuff and just cutting it down if you want to ease your logistics.  
Add more rolls of gauze Kling.  I carry 2” and 4”, no point in the 3” unless you just like it.  Also carry a couple of Ace bandages, I like 2” and 4” again.
Two triangular bandages is easier to sling and swath, secure parts for transport, etc.
Surgical tools but no suture material?  Not sure the point but make damn sure you know what you are doing before you decide to close a wound in the field.  
Why so many clippers and tweezers?
Looks like some redundancy on the tooth care but then I don’t remember the contents of those kits and I’m too lazy to look it up.  
Glucometers are a PITA to keep up with if you aren’t using them every day.  You need to do control checks on them and once the solution and test strips are opened they have limited shelf lives.  
Tympanic thermometers are nice and easy but an oral thermometer is smaller, lighter, cheaper and doesn’t require batteries.
The Welch Allyn penlight is redundant with your other lights.


Edited because I'm bored.
Link Posted: 2/16/2017 2:03:30 AM EDT
[#7]
Regarding the surgical gloves, I would second the idea that tighter is better than looser. I'm not a doc but when I was a cop we had DNA kits with oversized gloves in them and they were impossible to use. Also if those gloves are rolled up and held together with a paper band, consider replacing them with an unwrapped pair. I've tried the rolled gloves and I've had no luck with them. The end up getting rolled so tight that they are almost welded together and very difficult to get them to open up enough to don them. The gloves need to be easily located so that they can be put on quickly.
Link Posted: 2/16/2017 4:23:36 PM EDT
[#8]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Wow, that's a lot of stuff.  I’m going to assuming you have at least some training?  If not that is the first plae you need to start.  No idea to what level so I’ll just toss out some of my thoughts- apologies if you're a trauma doc or something.  I’ve never owned a Littman Cardiology because all of my stethoscopes seem to take a beating or some wanker steals them; they also need to be serviced periodically.  I usually use the Littman Master Classic or a Classic II (ADC stethoscopes suck in my opinion). - I agree on training, its a must to have. I have basic first aid training from the military and the state of California. Also, we usually have medical personnel participating in our events. The Littman Cardiology seemed like the better ones to get so that's why I added to the kit. I usually don't hang around thiefs so hopefully that won't be an issue. I figure the stethoscope, along with some of the other items in my kit, will be rarely used items so its loss won't be a significant problem.

The first thing I would recommend is taking the batteries out of the stuff that requires them unless you are very methodical about periodically inspecting them or use them on a regular basis.  I bought a couple of those clear tubes that hold batteries and I just rubber band them to each piece of equipment that needs them.  It adds a minute to your times and takes up a little bit more room but the changing temp cycles, especially the high heat in a vehicle during summer, just kills batteries.  I've had Energizers leak in the Pelican light used in a corpsman kit and the ophthalmoscope.  I managed to clean the scope but the acid messed up the plastic in the Pelican light which is also used in the laryngoscope handle.  Just my two cents worth. - I totally agree on the batteries, unfortunately I learnt the hard way a while back and have since addressed this issue. I have remove the batteries from most items, barring the ones with coin size batteries. I also added the green highlight on my inventory to reflect which items have batteries installed so I could monitor them more closely. I noticed my inventory was a little off in that it showed some items with batteries installed, which really wasn't the case. 

Other random thoughts:
Advil and Motrin are both ibuprofen. - I did this to provide choice for the taker's personal preference.
Zinc oxide?  It’s primarily used for sunblock but maybe that’s why it’s in there. - Protects chafed skin and dries the oozing and weeping of poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac
Chapstick will melt and make a mess, get something in a tube with a screw on top like the Carmex. - I do already have a tube of Carmex in the kit and will change out the Chapstick for the Screw on Top Carmex per your recommendation
The surgical masks seem redundant when you have N95 masks - The different masks have different purposes, e.g., the surgical masks have face shields, which provide eye protection whereas the N95 doesn't. The N95 masks provide repository protection whereas the surgical masks don't.
Disposable cpr mask are redundant when you have another barrier device that should work better (never used that one). - The extra/different CPR masks are in case more than one person needs CPR at a time. That way 2 or more people can perform CPR at one time.
Unless the XL gloves fit you they will be baggy and hard to work in; the fingertips get caught on everything and in the way in my experience.  I’d rather wear gloves one size too small than one size too large.  I’d split your gloves inventory into some mediums, some large and some xl if you think anyone else may be using your kit. - Will change out my glove load-out based on your recommendation
I prefer a small tube of the triple antibiotic with pain reliever to the non-pain relief formula.  Nice for kids and those small painful cracks I always get near my finger nails in the winter when my hands dry out.  Be aware that some folks are allergic to the neomycin in triple antibiotics and some docs are now recommending simply using bacitracin. - Will reevaluate my antibiotic load-out based on your recommendation and adjust accordingly
You’ve got a lot of bandaging supplies such as specialized stuff, i.e. knuckle bandages and tegaderms, that can be covered by using larger stuff and just cutting it down if you want to ease your logistics. - I have a pretty robust replacement regiment so a large variety isn't really an issue at this point
Add more rolls of gauze Kling.  I carry 2” and 4”, no point in the 3” unless you just like it.  Also carry a couple of Ace bandages, I like 2” and 4” again.
Two triangular bandages is easier to sling and swath, secure parts for transport, etc. - My kit contains 4 gauze rolls of various sizes, 2 ace bandages, 3 Israeli bandages, and several size splits, triangular bandages and raps, which I think should address most injuries in a single incident #fingerscrossed :) 
Surgical tools but no suture material?  Not sure the point but make damn sure you know what you are doing before you decide to close a wound in the field.  
Why so many clippers and tweezers? - The chances of me using the surgical tools is highly unlikely, I can't see a need where I'll ever use them. However, we usually have medical professionals participating in our events so I figure there may be a situation, e.g., long ATV runs, where they may find these tools useful/needed. As far suture materials, you're right. I've been reviewing the need to add more of those items to the system. I've been waiting to take a class on staple guns to get a better understanding as how they work and what is the best option. As for clippers and tweezers, they came in sets. The clippers are things like ingrown toenails, hang nails, etc, and the various type of tweezers are for tick, splinter, glass shard, etc removal.
Looks like some redundancy on the tooth care but then I don’t remember the contents of those kits and I’m too lazy to look it up.  
Glucometers are a PITA to keep up with if you aren’t using them every day.  You need to do control checks on them and once the solution and test strips are opened they have limited shelf lives. - There may be some over lap, which is unavoidable when buying premade kits. As for shelf life concerns, I have a good review and replacement system in place to address this issue. As for the Glucometer, to be honest, my best friend (who has diabetes) is always forgetting his shit so I added this to look out for him.
Tympanic thermometers are nice and easy but an oral thermometer is smaller, lighter, cheaper and doesn’t require batteries. - I have both, the oral is in the everyday kit and the ear one is in the special event kit. IMO the ear thermometer is a lot easier to use on kids and is more reliable 
The Welch Allyn penlight is redundant with your other lights. - The other lights in the kit aren't appropriate (too bright) to shine in someones eyes, which may be needed. 


Edited because I'm bored.
View Quote


Thank you for helping me improve my kit, I really appreciate it. 
Link Posted: 2/16/2017 4:27:38 PM EDT
[#9]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
My biggest concern is keeping everything fresh or at least in usable condition through the freeze and hot of the different seasons.

How long is a FAK good for when the inside truck temps get +120 and freeze - 0 ??
View Quote

So far it has survived one CA summer (100+ degrees) and we really don't have cold cold weather around where I live. I'm sure heat and cold affect items in the kit but I haven't seen any issues so far. I do keep a pretty good eye on it (in the summer mostly) and will replace anything defective immediately.
Link Posted: 2/16/2017 4:38:07 PM EDT
[#10]
This thread delivered! Thanks OP!
Link Posted: 2/16/2017 4:39:09 PM EDT
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Regarding the surgical gloves, I would second the idea that tighter is better than looser. I'm not a doc but when I was a cop we had DNA kits with oversized gloves in them and they were impossible to use. Also if those gloves are rolled up and held together with a paper band, consider replacing them with an unwrapped pair. I've tried the rolled gloves and I've had no luck with them. The end up getting rolled so tight that they are almost welded together and very difficult to get them to open up enough to don them. The gloves need to be easily located so that they can be put on quickly.
View Quote


I purposely buy rolled up higher end gloves for this system, which seems to have worked out pretty good so far. My plan is to rotate them every 2 years or when needed. In my system I have gloves everywhere, there is even a glove pouch on the outside of the main pack for easy access. I do agree I need to add different size gloves just in case others need to use them. I have to figure the best way to do this where easy of access, cleanliness, and protection is the goal.
Link Posted: 2/16/2017 8:34:15 PM EDT
[#12]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I purposely buy rolled up higher end gloves for this system, which seems to have worked out pretty good so far. My plan is to rotate them every 2 years or when needed. In my system I have gloves everywhere, there is even a glove pouch on the outside of the main pack for easy access. I do agree I need to add different size gloves just in case others need to use them. I have to figure the best way to do this where easy of access, cleanliness, and protection is the goal.
View Quote


Have you taken a random sample of the gloves in your kit and tried to don them?  I bought several of the same brand that you have in your kit and they were difficult to near impossible to use. They had all been stored inside so the issue wasn't heat related and I still had a hell of a time getting them on. If yours work, awesome but I changed out all of my kits to loose gloves. Getting into them when you have time is fairly easy but when you're bloody and under stress you don't need any impediments.

Also, consider buying (if you haven't already done so) "training" copies of your TQ, chest seals, pressure dressing and the like. That way you can periodically train with your gear without using the stuff in your kit.
Link Posted: 2/17/2017 8:02:00 AM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Have you taken a random sample of the gloves in your kit and tried to don them?  I bought several of the same brand that you have in your kit and they were difficult to near impossible to use. They had all been stored inside so the issue wasn't heat related and I still had a hell of a time getting them on. If yours work, awesome but I changed out all of my kits to loose gloves. Getting into them when you have time is fairly easy but when you're bloody and under stress you don't need any impediments.

Also, consider buying (if you haven't already done so) "training" copies of your TQ, chest seals, pressure dressing and the like. That way you can periodically train with your gear without using the stuff in your kit.
View Quote

I'll test the gloves today to see if there are any issues. I hope not, IMO these gloves are pretty expensive and would be bummed if they didn't work right.

I haven't bought any test items but I do rereview the videos on how to use the items every 3 months or so. I agree it's better to have ongoing hands on training but I don't really have anyone to practice with. 
Link Posted: 2/17/2017 6:45:18 PM EDT
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
This thread delivered! Thanks OP!
View Quote
You're welcome sir
Link Posted: 2/18/2017 12:34:09 AM EDT
[#15]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I'll test the gloves today to see if there are any issues. I hope not, IMO these gloves are pretty expensive and would be bummed if they didn't work right.

I haven't bought any test items but I do rereview the videos on how to use the items every 3 months or so. I agree it's better to have ongoing hands on training but I don't really have anyone to practice with. 
View Quote


You can practice on yourself with most of it. You really need to know how to put the TQ and the dressing on yourself anyway since their might not be anyone around to help.
Close Join Our Mail List to Stay Up To Date! Win a FREE Membership!

Sign up for the ARFCOM weekly newsletter and be entered to win a free ARFCOM membership. One new winner* is announced every week!

You will receive an email every Friday morning featuring the latest chatter from the hottest topics, breaking news surrounding legislation, as well as exclusive deals only available to ARFCOM email subscribers.


By signing up you agree to our User Agreement. *Must have a registered ARFCOM account to win.
Top Top