Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 10/13/2016 4:42:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/13/2016 4:43:58 PM EST by Dsparil]
Anyone have experience with these? Any good? Buying a house with 600 sqft upper room. Owner is taking the stove with him since it's a family heirloom. Thing was a giant potbelly stove that was bigtime overkill.

Want to replace it with something simple.

Here's a link. It's nice and simple.

http://m.acehardware.com//product/index.jsp?productId=107173126&KPID=24637137&cid=CAPLA:G:Shopping_-_Heating_-_Fireplaces/Inserts_-_New&pla=pla_24637137&k_clickid=bd6431a1-5f6e-434d-9a3e-0318c904c55b


Haven't heard of the brand but no idea how you can screw up a small wood stove.
Link Posted: 10/13/2016 4:55:36 PM EST
not ul listed,check your insurance company if they will cover it,I personally would buy a name brand used over it
Link Posted: 10/13/2016 5:26:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/13/2016 6:58:36 PM EST by Dsparil]
Just read their made in china. Looking for a decent 600 sq ft wood stove that isnt going to cost me an arm and a leg.
Link Posted: 10/13/2016 7:49:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/13/2016 7:51:36 PM EST by Merlin]
England Stove Works 13-NC. Smaller brother to the much larger 30-NC. I have the 30-NC in my living room, heats tour whole 2100 sq ft house. We're in SC TN, so YMMV.

http://www.heatredefined.com/englander/stove/Englander-1200-1800-Sq.-Ft.-Wood-Stove



The Englanders are very highly rated stoves over at Hearth.com, the Arfcom of wood heat.

Good luck.

Link Posted: 10/14/2016 10:50:06 AM EST
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
Anyone have experience with these? Any good? Buying a house with 600 sqft upper room. Owner is taking the stove with him since it's a family heirloom. Thing was a giant potbelly stove that was bigtime overkill.

Want to replace it with something simple.

Here's a link. It's nice and simple.

http://m.acehardware.com//product/index.jsp?productId=107173126&KPID=24637137&cid=CAPLA:G:Shopping_-_Heating_-_Fireplaces/Inserts_-_New&pla=pla_24637137&k_clickid=bd6431a1-5f6e-434d-9a3e-0318c904c55b


Haven't heard of the brand but no idea how you can screw up a small wood stove.
View Quote


I have one of those. I am not sure I would use it in a house without a brick floor / rear wall and the proper triple wall chimney. It does put off heat! It is a boxwood stove popular with hunting cabins and the like.

If you DO get one, have your first fire OUTSIDE, the sealant and paint stink to high heaven during the first burn. Lots of reviews out there.


Link Posted: 10/14/2016 5:09:06 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/14/2016 8:10:47 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JoseCuervo:


I have one of those. I am not sure I would use it in a house without a brick floor / rear wall and the proper triple wall chimney. It does put off heat! It is a boxwood stove popular with hunting cabins and the like.

If you DO get one, have your first fire OUTSIDE, the sealant and paint stink to high heaven during the first burn. Lots of reviews out there.


View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JoseCuervo:
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
Anyone have experience with these? Any good? Buying a house with 600 sqft upper room. Owner is taking the stove with him since it's a family heirloom. Thing was a giant potbelly stove that was bigtime overkill.

Want to replace it with something simple.

Here's a link. It's nice and simple.

http://m.acehardware.com//product/index.jsp?productId=107173126&KPID=24637137&cid=CAPLA:G:Shopping_-_Heating_-_Fireplaces/Inserts_-_New&pla=pla_24637137&k_clickid=bd6431a1-5f6e-434d-9a3e-0318c904c55b


Haven't heard of the brand but no idea how you can screw up a small wood stove.


I have one of those. I am not sure I would use it in a house without a brick floor / rear wall and the proper triple wall chimney. It does put off heat! It is a boxwood stove popular with hunting cabins and the like.

If you DO get one, have your first fire OUTSIDE, the sealant and paint stink to high heaven during the first burn. Lots of reviews out there.





That's what I am buying. Pretty much a hunting ranch/house. Knotty pine inside.
Link Posted: 10/18/2016 10:35:43 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Merlin:
England Stove Works 13-NC. Smaller brother to the much larger 30-NC. I have the 30-NC in my living room, heats tour whole 2100 sq ft house. We're in SC TN, so YMMV.

http://www.heatredefined.com/englander/stove/Englander-1200-1800-Sq.-Ft.-Wood-Stove

http://www.heatredefined.com/assets/images/products/88/13-nc_notrim_pedestal_nickel__product.jpg

The Englanders are very highly rated stoves over at Hearth.com, the Arfcom of wood heat.

Good luck.

View Quote

I have one and its a good stove.
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 2:39:31 AM EST
Another vote to England Stove Works stoves. Good US made stoves at a good price. Not the fanciest out there but still rock solid stoves for the money.
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 6:54:05 AM EST
I used to work for the company that made the part that England stove are made from. Really heavy duty metal. 7 - 12 gauge.


Vulcan94
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 9:38:18 AM EST
7yrs now with the 13-NC with no complaints. I'm heating a 1500 sq/ft 25yr old ranch in Mid MO. Less than 3 cords a yr, and it is usually 80º in the living room as my wife is reptilian. I "might" need to replace the baffle board this year, but then I thought that 2 yrs ago too. Firebox is a bit small for overnight burns, but 8hrs between loads is not unusual.
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 8:17:27 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 8:25:58 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 8:46:29 PM EST
I have the 30-NC with the pedestal. One downside to the Englanders 30-nc is the ridiculous R rating required for the floor below the stove. In my case, the 30- requires an R rating of 1.5. which requires 4 layers of Duroc NexGen concrete board. I don'/t recall what the legged model requires.
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 9:41:31 PM EST
I have the newest Madison stove. It's sized between the 13 and the 30. It has almost no requirements for the hearth compared to the other two. Of course, I can't tell you if it's good or not because I haven't used it yet. Should be firing it soon though.
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 9:51:44 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 9:54:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
You guys with the Englander..

It says it is Mobile Home safe with the PEDESTAL, but not with the legs.

I haven't bought a wood stove since they got all high-tech.

Why does the pedestal make a difference in that?

Disclosure: I do NOT live in a mobile home, but that caught my attention.
View Quote


Pedestal probably spreads out the weight.
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 9:57:08 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/19/2016 10:20:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2016 9:58:34 PM EST by marinesg1012]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:




I'm sure, but what does that have to do with the heat?


View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Originally Posted By callmestick:
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
You guys with the Englander..

It says it is Mobile Home safe with the PEDESTAL, but not with the legs.

I haven't bought a wood stove since they got all high-tech.

Why does the pedestal make a difference in that?

Disclosure: I do NOT live in a mobile home, but that caught my attention.


Pedestal probably spreads out the weight.




I'm sure, but what does that have to do with the heat?



Edit for clarification:
Mobil home safe requires fresh air from outside, the pedestal probably has the fresh air option where the legs dont.
Link Posted: 10/20/2016 10:00:33 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By marinesg1012:

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By marinesg1012:
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Originally Posted By callmestick:
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
You guys with the Englander..

It says it is Mobile Home safe with the PEDESTAL, but not with the legs.

I haven't bought a wood stove since they got all high-tech.

Why does the pedestal make a difference in that?

Disclosure: I do NOT live in a mobile home, but that caught my attention.


Pedestal probably spreads out the weight.


Mobil home safe requires fresh air from outside, the pedestal probably has the fresh air option where the legs dont.

I'm sure, but what does that have to do with the heat?





That's it!
Link Posted: 10/20/2016 10:36:17 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/20/2016 10:40:40 AM EST by ColtRifle]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:


Pics or ban.



I'm kidding, but of course we want to see.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
I have the newest Madison stove. It's sized between the 13 and the 30. It has almost no requirements for the hearth compared to the other two. Of course, I can't tell you if it's good or not because I haven't used it yet. Should be firing it soon though.


Pics or ban.



I'm kidding, but of course we want to see.







Mantle is 2 cedar 4x4s glued and screwed together. I then burned it randomly with a torch. Then MANY coats of poly on it.




This is mounted in a basement. The chimney is stainless triple wall Duravent chimney. The chimney connecting pipe is Duravent double wall pipe due to clearance from the mantle. This pic is where it meets the mounting part that routes the chimney through the main floor of the house. I also have the outside air hooked up. There is a lot of dispute on outside air for wood stoves but this house is pretty tight so I decided I'd rather have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.

Link Posted: 10/20/2016 11:33:32 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/20/2016 1:24:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/20/2016 1:25:16 PM EST by Dsparil]
Question: Are there spacers available for cement board?


Requirements for the Englander 13-nc is 2 inch space between the cement board and the chimney. Are there spacers or a frame system I can buy to create that gap?


Just finished reading the instruction manual for it on installation.
Link Posted: 10/20/2016 3:01:46 PM EST
You can buy spacers for wall protection boards. You can also buy ready made hearth/wallboards that may not need spacers but the tend to be expensive. I do recommend a high quality hearth floor protector. They will protect your floor from the heat and embers that will fall out occasionally.

BTW the 13NC is a great stove but in a 900 soft space it can put out a LOT of heat with seasoned wood. I can get my 800 soft cabin up to 90F with little effort. I don't even think abou firing it up unless the temps stay under 45F
Link Posted: 10/21/2016 9:05:47 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
Question: Are there spacers available for cement board?


Requirements for the Englander 13-nc is 2 inch space between the cement board and the chimney. Are there spacers or a frame system I can buy to create that gap?


Just finished reading the instruction manual for it on installation.
View Quote

I haven't read the install manual for the 13NC, but I'm a bit confused. Does the manual call for 2" clearance between the cement board and the combustible surfaces behind it or is it possibly calling for a 2' clearance to combustibles? For Class A (insulated) chimney 2" clearance to combustibles is the norm and I'm wondering if you may be confusing that with clearance behind the cement board...
Link Posted: 10/21/2016 2:50:33 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:

I haven't read the install manual for the 13NC, but I'm a bit confused. Does the manual call for 2" clearance between the cement board and the combustible surfaces behind it or is it possibly calling for a 2' clearance to combustibles? For Class A (insulated) chimney 2" clearance to combustibles is the norm and I'm wondering if you may be confusing that with clearance behind the cement board...
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
Question: Are there spacers available for cement board?


Requirements for the Englander 13-nc is 2 inch space between the cement board and the chimney. Are there spacers or a frame system I can buy to create that gap?


Just finished reading the instruction manual for it on installation.

I haven't read the install manual for the 13NC, but I'm a bit confused. Does the manual call for 2" clearance between the cement board and the combustible surfaces behind it or is it possibly calling for a 2' clearance to combustibles? For Class A (insulated) chimney 2" clearance to combustibles is the norm and I'm wondering if you may be confusing that with clearance behind the cement board...



You're right. I mis-read it. It's 1" clearance from the cement board and the chimney bricks. It'd be the chimney bricks, then 1" gap with spacers, then cement board then the tile job.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 8:43:28 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
I have the newest Madison stove. It's sized between the 13 and the 30. It has almost no requirements for the hearth compared to the other two. Of course, I can't tell you if it's good or not because I haven't used it yet. Should be firing it soon though.
View Quote

I'm interested in your reports on it... I'm considering it's larger brother that Lowe's sells for my shop... I've heard the auto-air thing is a bit flaky but who knows? Right now it's between that and the Drolet HT2000; both similar in price and size, Drolet is a bit more expensive but has a lifetime warranty on the firebox etc...

Link Posted: 10/22/2016 2:29:48 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:

I'm interested in your reports on it... I'm considering it's larger brother that Lowe's sells for my shop... I've heard the auto-air thing is a bit flaky but who knows? Right now it's between that and the Drolet HT2000; both similar in price and size, Drolet is a bit more expensive but has a lifetime warranty on the firebox etc...

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
I have the newest Madison stove. It's sized between the 13 and the 30. It has almost no requirements for the hearth compared to the other two. Of course, I can't tell you if it's good or not because I haven't used it yet. Should be firing it soon though.

I'm interested in your reports on it... I'm considering it's larger brother that Lowe's sells for my shop... I've heard the auto-air thing is a bit flaky but who knows? Right now it's between that and the Drolet HT2000; both similar in price and size, Drolet is a bit more expensive but has a lifetime warranty on the firebox etc...




Not much of a report but I fired it up for the first time. I lit it inside with the windows open. The paint didn't smoke but did stink a bit. Not bad though. House aired out nicely afterward.

I lit a small fire and let it burn out. Then lit a bigger fire and got the stove hot. Then let it burn out.

I grew up with wood heat but didn't have a modern airtight stove. Gotta say, I'm impressed so far. Wood burned completely with very little left over ash. Seemed to produce plenty of heat (but not much of a test since the windows were open). Firebox is slightly small compared to the stoves I grew up with but still plenty big enough for a good size wood load.

I am looking forward to the first real cold weather of the year to see how it does. It'll be heating 2450 sq ft but it's very well insulated.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 3:12:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2016 3:14:44 PM EST by Dsparil]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:



Not much of a report but I fired it up for the first time. I lit it inside with the windows open. The paint didn't smoke but did stink a bit. Not bad though. House aired out nicely afterward.

I lit a small fire and let it burn out. Then lit a bigger fire and got the stove hot. Then let it burn out.

I grew up with wood heat but didn't have a modern airtight stove. Gotta say, I'm impressed so far. Wood burned completely with very little left over ash. Seemed to produce plenty of heat (but not much of a test since the windows were open). Firebox is slightly small compared to the stoves I grew up with but still plenty big enough for a good size wood load.

I am looking forward to the first real cold weather of the year to see how it does. It'll be heating 2450 sq ft but it's very well insulated.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
I have the newest Madison stove. It's sized between the 13 and the 30. It has almost no requirements for the hearth compared to the other two. Of course, I can't tell you if it's good or not because I haven't used it yet. Should be firing it soon though.

I'm interested in your reports on it... I'm considering it's larger brother that Lowe's sells for my shop... I've heard the auto-air thing is a bit flaky but who knows? Right now it's between that and the Drolet HT2000; both similar in price and size, Drolet is a bit more expensive but has a lifetime warranty on the firebox etc...




Not much of a report but I fired it up for the first time. I lit it inside with the windows open. The paint didn't smoke but did stink a bit. Not bad though. House aired out nicely afterward.

I lit a small fire and let it burn out. Then lit a bigger fire and got the stove hot. Then let it burn out.

I grew up with wood heat but didn't have a modern airtight stove. Gotta say, I'm impressed so far. Wood burned completely with very little left over ash. Seemed to produce plenty of heat (but not much of a test since the windows were open). Firebox is slightly small compared to the stoves I grew up with but still plenty big enough for a good size wood load.

I am looking forward to the first real cold weather of the year to see how it does. It'll be heating 2450 sq ft but it's very well insulated.




What's the model number and what was the burn time?


I checked up further on the pleasant hearth and englander stoves and they require R 2.0 hearth pads. In other words, cant just use a prefab hearth pad. Gotta have it built.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 4:31:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2016 4:33:19 PM EST by ColtRifle]
Not sure of the model number at the moment but it's called the Madison. I believe this model does not require specific R value under it.....just fire resistant surface.

Don't have a burn time yet. I fired it the second time till it was up to about 500* and then shut off the air flow. It stayed very hot for several hours but it wasn't full of wood either.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:16:57 PM EST
To answer the original question on the cast iron box stove .
I had one of the same pattern years ago and used it as my sole heat for a couple of years.
It was a decent durable stove but by design it has some fairly loose joints and is not at all air tight. It doesn't regulate well and if you load it up it will burn verry hot.

It is really more the thing for a barn or garage where you want a fair amount of heat while you are out there working but not trying to make it last all night.

After some time I learned to use mine by cementing up some of the loose joints and learning how to bank the fire by leaving a certain level of ashes.

After a couple of years I bought a better stove and never looked back
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:42:26 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/24/2016 3:51:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/24/2016 8:56:44 AM EST by SigOwner_P229]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dsparil:




What's the model number and what was the burn time?


I checked up further on the pleasant hearth and englander stoves and they require R 2.0 hearth pads. In other words, cant just use a prefab hearth pad. Gotta have it built.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
I have the newest Madison stove. It's sized between the 13 and the 30. It has almost no requirements for the hearth compared to the other two. Of course, I can't tell you if it's good or not because I haven't used it yet. Should be firing it soon though.

I'm interested in your reports on it... I'm considering it's larger brother that Lowe's sells for my shop... I've heard the auto-air thing is a bit flaky but who knows? Right now it's between that and the Drolet HT2000; both similar in price and size, Drolet is a bit more expensive but has a lifetime warranty on the firebox etc...




Not much of a report but I fired it up for the first time. I lit it inside with the windows open. The paint didn't smoke but did stink a bit. Not bad though. House aired out nicely afterward.

I lit a small fire and let it burn out. Then lit a bigger fire and got the stove hot. Then let it burn out.

I grew up with wood heat but didn't have a modern airtight stove. Gotta say, I'm impressed so far. Wood burned completely with very little left over ash. Seemed to produce plenty of heat (but not much of a test since the windows were open). Firebox is slightly small compared to the stoves I grew up with but still plenty big enough for a good size wood load.

I am looking forward to the first real cold weather of the year to see how it does. It'll be heating 2450 sq ft but it's very well insulated.




What's the model number and what was the burn time?


I checked up further on the pleasant hearth and englander stoves and they require R 2.0 hearth pads. In other words, cant just use a prefab hearth pad. Gotta have it built.


That's the Summer's Heat 50-SHSSW01; it requires ember protection only for the hearth (non-combustible material with no specific R-value necessary)

ETA, you won't find ANY information on England Stove Works (maker of Englander, Summer's Heat, and 1 other) about the 50-SHSSW01 or 50-SHSSW02 (closer in size to the NC-30) except that you can download the manual from their dowloads page. I'm not sure why they don't have any information on them, I currently have an inquiry in to an employee there (that is a member on hearth.com) about more info. I'll share what I find out. I know Englander does make some "Lowe's Exclusive" models, maybe these 2 "smart-stoves" are Lowe's exclusive and that's why there is no info? ColtRifle, did you buy yours at Lowe's?
Link Posted: 10/24/2016 9:27:00 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:


That's the Summer's Heat 50-SHSSW01; it requires ember protection only for the hearth (non-combustible material with no specific R-value necessary)

ETA, you won't find ANY information on England Stove Works (maker of Englander, Summer's Heat, and 1 other) about the 50-SHSSW01 or 50-SHSSW02 (closer in size to the NC-30) except that you can download the manual from their dowloads page. I'm not sure why they don't have any information on them, I currently have an inquiry in to an employee there (that is a member on hearth.com) about more info. I'll share what I find out. I know Englander does make some "Lowe's Exclusive" models, maybe these 2 "smart-stoves" are Lowe's exclusive and that's why there is no info? ColtRifle, did you buy yours at Lowe's?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
I have the newest Madison stove. It's sized between the 13 and the 30. It has almost no requirements for the hearth compared to the other two. Of course, I can't tell you if it's good or not because I haven't used it yet. Should be firing it soon though.

I'm interested in your reports on it... I'm considering it's larger brother that Lowe's sells for my shop... I've heard the auto-air thing is a bit flaky but who knows? Right now it's between that and the Drolet HT2000; both similar in price and size, Drolet is a bit more expensive but has a lifetime warranty on the firebox etc...




Not much of a report but I fired it up for the first time. I lit it inside with the windows open. The paint didn't smoke but did stink a bit. Not bad though. House aired out nicely afterward.

I lit a small fire and let it burn out. Then lit a bigger fire and got the stove hot. Then let it burn out.

I grew up with wood heat but didn't have a modern airtight stove. Gotta say, I'm impressed so far. Wood burned completely with very little left over ash. Seemed to produce plenty of heat (but not much of a test since the windows were open). Firebox is slightly small compared to the stoves I grew up with but still plenty big enough for a good size wood load.

I am looking forward to the first real cold weather of the year to see how it does. It'll be heating 2450 sq ft but it's very well insulated.




What's the model number and what was the burn time?


I checked up further on the pleasant hearth and englander stoves and they require R 2.0 hearth pads. In other words, cant just use a prefab hearth pad. Gotta have it built.


That's the Summer's Heat 50-SHSSW01; it requires ember protection only for the hearth (non-combustible material with no specific R-value necessary)

ETA, you won't find ANY information on England Stove Works (maker of Englander, Summer's Heat, and 1 other) about the 50-SHSSW01 or 50-SHSSW02 (closer in size to the NC-30) except that you can download the manual from their dowloads page. I'm not sure why they don't have any information on them, I currently have an inquiry in to an employee there (that is a member on hearth.com) about more info. I'll share what I find out. I know Englander does make some "Lowe's Exclusive" models, maybe these 2 "smart-stoves" are Lowe's exclusive and that's why there is no info? ColtRifle, did you buy yours at Lowe's?



Yes I did buy it at Lowes. I believe that is the correct stove model.

They don't put much info out there. I bought this one because it is bigger than the 13 but smaller than the 30.

In my last house we had an England Stove Works pellet stove. Nice stove and never had any issues with it.

I think England stoves are the best value for the money out there. People on hearth.com seem to have the same opinion.
Link Posted: 10/24/2016 11:49:39 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:



Yes I did buy it at Lowes. I believe that is the correct stove model.

They don't put much info out there. I bought this one because it is bigger than the 13 but smaller than the 30.

In my last house we had an England Stove Works pellet stove. Nice stove and never had any issues with it.

I think England stoves are the best value for the money out there. People on hearth.com seem to have the same opinion.
View Quote

I have to agree that they are the best bang for the buck... the Lowe's exclusive's are made to hit a specific price-point and target audience; I think that's why they made them "smart stoves". I'm a bit torn between the NC-30 equivalent and the larger brother to yours... I'll post here when I found out more info.

If I were concerned about hearth R-value I would definitely be buying the big brother to yours (ember protection only), but because it's going on a concrete floor I don't really care. Supposedly they cheapened up the baffle above the secondary combustion tubes quite a bit but I'm not sure what else they cheapened up...
Link Posted: 10/24/2016 1:30:59 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:

I have to agree that they are the best bang for the buck... the Lowe's exclusive's are made to hit a specific price-point and target audience; I think that's why they made them "smart stoves". I'm a bit torn between the NC-30 equivalent and the larger brother to yours... I'll post here when I found out more info.

If I were concerned about hearth R-value I would definitely be buying the big brother to yours (ember protection only), but because it's going on a concrete floor I don't really care. Supposedly they cheapened up the baffle above the secondary combustion tubes quite a bit but I'm not sure what else they cheapened up...
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:



Yes I did buy it at Lowes. I believe that is the correct stove model.

They don't put much info out there. I bought this one because it is bigger than the 13 but smaller than the 30.

In my last house we had an England Stove Works pellet stove. Nice stove and never had any issues with it.

I think England stoves are the best value for the money out there. People on hearth.com seem to have the same opinion.

I have to agree that they are the best bang for the buck... the Lowe's exclusive's are made to hit a specific price-point and target audience; I think that's why they made them "smart stoves". I'm a bit torn between the NC-30 equivalent and the larger brother to yours... I'll post here when I found out more info.

If I were concerned about hearth R-value I would definitely be buying the big brother to yours (ember protection only), but because it's going on a concrete floor I don't really care. Supposedly they cheapened up the baffle above the secondary combustion tubes quite a bit but I'm not sure what else they cheapened up...



I'm not sure. I don't plan to use the stove much. Mainly for power outages and as a supplement when the temps really dip.

I was first going to install the 30 but I believe that it would have burned us out of the house. The house is 2450 sq ft but it's a rectangle shape (actually almost square) and VERY well insulated. I was then going to get the 13. My main reason for being hesitant was the size of the firebox. I don't think anyone gets anything close to 8 hrs of burn time out of them...more like 4-6. This stove seemed like a nice balance of size between the two of them.

The fiber board above the tubes seems to be the same as the other stoves from looking at both of them.

I think I paid around $750 for mine off season. The stove was the cheap part. I have well over $1000 in the chimney.
Link Posted: 10/24/2016 3:02:53 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:



I'm not sure. I don't plan to use the stove much. Mainly for power outages and as a supplement when the temps really dip.

I was first going to install the 30 but I believe that it would have burned us out of the house. The house is 2450 sq ft but it's a rectangle shape (actually almost square) and VERY well insulated. I was then going to get the 13. My main reason for being hesitant was the size of the firebox. I don't think anyone gets anything close to 8 hrs of burn time out of them...more like 4-6. This stove seemed like a nice balance of size between the two of them.

The fiber board above the tubes seems to be the same as the other stoves from looking at both of them.

I think I paid around $750 for mine off season. The stove was the cheap part. I have well over $1000 in the chimney.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:



Yes I did buy it at Lowes. I believe that is the correct stove model.

They don't put much info out there. I bought this one because it is bigger than the 13 but smaller than the 30.

In my last house we had an England Stove Works pellet stove. Nice stove and never had any issues with it.

I think England stoves are the best value for the money out there. People on hearth.com seem to have the same opinion.

I have to agree that they are the best bang for the buck... the Lowe's exclusive's are made to hit a specific price-point and target audience; I think that's why they made them "smart stoves". I'm a bit torn between the NC-30 equivalent and the larger brother to yours... I'll post here when I found out more info.

If I were concerned about hearth R-value I would definitely be buying the big brother to yours (ember protection only), but because it's going on a concrete floor I don't really care. Supposedly they cheapened up the baffle above the secondary combustion tubes quite a bit but I'm not sure what else they cheapened up...



I'm not sure. I don't plan to use the stove much. Mainly for power outages and as a supplement when the temps really dip.

I was first going to install the 30 but I believe that it would have burned us out of the house. The house is 2450 sq ft but it's a rectangle shape (actually almost square) and VERY well insulated. I was then going to get the 13. My main reason for being hesitant was the size of the firebox. I don't think anyone gets anything close to 8 hrs of burn time out of them...more like 4-6. This stove seemed like a nice balance of size between the two of them.

The fiber board above the tubes seems to be the same as the other stoves from looking at both of them.

I think I paid around $750 for mine off season. The stove was the cheap part. I have well over $1000 in the chimney.

Class A chimney isn't cheap, but IMHO, it's well worth it simply for the fact that it has low clearance to combustibles (2") and resistance to chimney fires... Since mine will be going in a pole-barn I will be using a lot of single-wall pipe to keep as much heat as possible inside the envelope, then a short run of Class A outside... Total cost of my install after tax credit, discounts, etc should be less than $1400....
Link Posted: 10/24/2016 7:59:06 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:


That's the Summer's Heat 50-SHSSW01; it requires ember protection only for the hearth (non-combustible material with no specific R-value necessary)

ETA, you won't find ANY information on England Stove Works (maker of Englander, Summer's Heat, and 1 other) about the 50-SHSSW01 or 50-SHSSW02 (closer in size to the NC-30) except that you can download the manual from their dowloads page. I'm not sure why they don't have any information on them, I currently have an inquiry in to an employee there (that is a member on hearth.com) about more info. I'll share what I find out. I know Englander does make some "Lowe's Exclusive" models, maybe these 2 "smart-stoves" are Lowe's exclusive and that's why there is no info? ColtRifle, did you buy yours at Lowe's?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
I have the newest Madison stove. It's sized between the 13 and the 30. It has almost no requirements for the hearth compared to the other two. Of course, I can't tell you if it's good or not because I haven't used it yet. Should be firing it soon though.

I'm interested in your reports on it... I'm considering it's larger brother that Lowe's sells for my shop... I've heard the auto-air thing is a bit flaky but who knows? Right now it's between that and the Drolet HT2000; both similar in price and size, Drolet is a bit more expensive but has a lifetime warranty on the firebox etc...




Not much of a report but I fired it up for the first time. I lit it inside with the windows open. The paint didn't smoke but did stink a bit. Not bad though. House aired out nicely afterward.

I lit a small fire and let it burn out. Then lit a bigger fire and got the stove hot. Then let it burn out.

I grew up with wood heat but didn't have a modern airtight stove. Gotta say, I'm impressed so far. Wood burned completely with very little left over ash. Seemed to produce plenty of heat (but not much of a test since the windows were open). Firebox is slightly small compared to the stoves I grew up with but still plenty big enough for a good size wood load.

I am looking forward to the first real cold weather of the year to see how it does. It'll be heating 2450 sq ft but it's very well insulated.




What's the model number and what was the burn time?


I checked up further on the pleasant hearth and englander stoves and they require R 2.0 hearth pads. In other words, cant just use a prefab hearth pad. Gotta have it built.


That's the Summer's Heat 50-SHSSW01; it requires ember protection only for the hearth (non-combustible material with no specific R-value necessary)

ETA, you won't find ANY information on England Stove Works (maker of Englander, Summer's Heat, and 1 other) about the 50-SHSSW01 or 50-SHSSW02 (closer in size to the NC-30) except that you can download the manual from their dowloads page. I'm not sure why they don't have any information on them, I currently have an inquiry in to an employee there (that is a member on hearth.com) about more info. I'll share what I find out. I know Englander does make some "Lowe's Exclusive" models, maybe these 2 "smart-stoves" are Lowe's exclusive and that's why there is no info? ColtRifle, did you buy yours at Lowe's?


I havent purchased one yet. doing research.
Link Posted: 10/28/2016 1:36:55 PM EST
terracotta piping in house I'm buying. Opinions?
Link Posted: 10/28/2016 3:28:18 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
terracotta piping in house I'm buying. Opinions?
View Quote



If it's not cracked then it works fine. If it's cracked, you can line it with a stainless liner. My mom did for her stove and it was a huge improvement.
Link Posted: 10/28/2016 3:43:54 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:



If it's not cracked then it works fine. If it's cracked, you can line it with a stainless liner. My mom did for her stove and it was a huge improvement.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
terracotta piping in house I'm buying. Opinions?



If it's not cracked then it works fine. If it's cracked, you can line it with a stainless liner. My mom did for her stove and it was a huge improvement.



not cracked.
Link Posted: 11/11/2016 8:37:56 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dsparil:




What's the model number and what was the burn time?


I checked up further on the pleasant hearth and englander stoves and they require R 2.0 hearth pads. In other words, cant just use a prefab hearth pad. Gotta have it built.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dsparil:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
I have the newest Madison stove. It's sized between the 13 and the 30. It has almost no requirements for the hearth compared to the other two. Of course, I can't tell you if it's good or not because I haven't used it yet. Should be firing it soon though.

I'm interested in your reports on it... I'm considering it's larger brother that Lowe's sells for my shop... I've heard the auto-air thing is a bit flaky but who knows? Right now it's between that and the Drolet HT2000; both similar in price and size, Drolet is a bit more expensive but has a lifetime warranty on the firebox etc...




Not much of a report but I fired it up for the first time. I lit it inside with the windows open. The paint didn't smoke but did stink a bit. Not bad though. House aired out nicely afterward.

I lit a small fire and let it burn out. Then lit a bigger fire and got the stove hot. Then let it burn out.

I grew up with wood heat but didn't have a modern airtight stove. Gotta say, I'm impressed so far. Wood burned completely with very little left over ash. Seemed to produce plenty of heat (but not much of a test since the windows were open). Firebox is slightly small compared to the stoves I grew up with but still plenty big enough for a good size wood load.

I am looking forward to the first real cold weather of the year to see how it does. It'll be heating 2450 sq ft but it's very well insulated.




What's the model number and what was the burn time?


I checked up further on the pleasant hearth and englander stoves and they require R 2.0 hearth pads. In other words, cant just use a prefab hearth pad. Gotta have it built.


The Englander 30-NC requires R = 1.5, unless they changed it recently. That's equivalent to four Durock NexGen 1/2" concrete boards (1.56). that's what I used for my hearth:

Hearth under construction:



Finished product:

Link Posted: 12/8/2016 7:52:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/8/2016 8:32:45 PM EST by ColtRifle]
Had a cold snap and have been running the Madison. So far, I like it. Still learning how to work it. I haven't used the auto air set back yet. Not sure if I even will.

You have to keep the air hole in the front of the stove cleaned out. Otherwise it chokes itself. It's a little nuisance but not a big deal. The fire box isn't as big as stoves I've used in the past. So, I have to cut my wood about 16 inches long. Don't have any real runtime data yet. It's heating 2450 sqft but it's a well insulated house. There is almost no smoke coming out the chimney when it's running.

I really like the double wall connecting pipe. I can touch it with my hand when it's running full blast. I can't keep my hand on it for long but I can touch it without getting burned.
Link Posted: 12/9/2016 10:08:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/9/2016 10:10:38 PM EST by lokt]
What do you think one of these bundles weighs? It says "very dry", let's assume it's more like moderately dry, wood is "mostly pine."

http://dallas.craigslist.org/dal/mad/5907624697.html
Link Posted: 12/10/2016 11:39:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/10/2016 11:40:05 AM EST by Merlin]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:



If it's not cracked then it works fine. If it's cracked, you can line it with a stainless liner. My mom did for her stove and it was a huge improvement.
View Quote

No.  Masonry chimneys without a SS Class A liner is no longer allowed by code (NFPA 211 et al).

See more here:  http://www.chimneysweeponline.com/hounlfp.htm
Link Posted: 12/10/2016 8:07:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Merlin:

No.  Masonry chimneys without a SS Class A liner is no longer allowed by code (NFPA 211 et al).

See more here:  http://www.chimneysweeponline.com/hounlfp.htm
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Merlin:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:



If it's not cracked then it works fine. If it's cracked, you can line it with a stainless liner. My mom did for her stove and it was a huge improvement.

No.  Masonry chimneys without a SS Class A liner is no longer allowed by code (NFPA 211 et al).

See more here:  http://www.chimneysweeponline.com/hounlfp.htm


Re-read what the poster has. He has the terra cotta piping. Your link specifically says that terra cotta piping is fine. I haven't seen a masonry only chimney in many years. Every chimney I am aware of is either metal pipe or masonry with either metal or terra cotta pipe lined. Nearly all new chimneys in my area are stainless. No one is doing terra cotta any more. I'm sure it's more expensive than stainless. Definitely more labor intensive.
Link Posted: 12/11/2016 1:17:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/18/2016 11:40:52 AM EST by Merlin]
My bad, I read that as step#1 and Step #2.

I'd still do a SS liner anyways.  Safer plus less creosote buildup due to better chimney insulation.
Link Posted: 12/11/2016 11:22:29 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Merlin:
My bad, I read that as step#1 and Step #2.

I'd stil do a SS liner anyways.  Safer plus less creosote buildup due to better chimney insulation.
View Quote


I grew up with the terra cotta pipe. I definitely prefer the stainless pipe. My mom's house stove grew up with did work better once she installed the stainless liner. It worked before but the chimney drew better once the liner was installed.
Link Posted: 12/12/2016 3:21:16 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kitties-with-Sigs:


When you say "of the same pattern" do you mean you bought this model stove?

Or did you buy another stove that looks like this?
View Quote

that stove can be bought many places. Tractor supply had them the other day too. They are not good stoves to depend on heating a house with. The wifes father uses one in his garage. It is ok there as he is not trying to regulate temps well,just get it warm to work. Insurance companies may drop you if they find it in your house,,better check!
Link Posted: 12/18/2016 11:13:39 AM EST
Update to my England Stove Works Madison....it was 1 degree this morning when I woke up. We fired up the stove last night and ran it over night. It ran for about 6 hours or a bit more on a loading (I stuffed it full before going to bed). It still had a big bed of coals when I woke up. I tossed in some split pieces and in about 10 minutes or so it was blazing away.

I really like the stove. The only thing I have discovered is that I like to burn a east/west loading in the stove and it's not very wide. A lot of wood cutters will cut firewood at about 18 inches long. This stove works a lot better if you cut your wood at 15-16 inches long.

It keeps the basement around 80 degrees or more (77 when I got up this morning with the fire died down). We have a circulation option on the furnace fan (off for 20 mins/on for 10 mins) and the house stays nice and comfortable throughout.

I added an air return grate in the drop ceiling to help get more hot air into the floor above.











Top Top