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Posted: 8/14/2007 1:16:38 PM EDT
Hello Survival Forum Members

LONG TIME Lurker – Few Times Poster. . .

I am planning on taking my first “over seas” trip in October. I will be visiting Thailand and Cambodia for about a month total. I am looking forward to the adventure. Temples, History, Elephant Safaris, Snake shows and all sorts of fun.

To the point—

I am going to be carrying my trusty Maxpedition Thermite Versapack in Black with me pretty much everywhere.
http://widget.slide.com/rdr/1/1/3/W/10000000b5b3bba/1/44/OPOwM8gq7z9CXxzt9_QoMTY0MXCgtwyK.jpg

Main: 8" x 5" x 3"
Frontal: 6" x 4" x 1"
Sides: 5" x 1.5" x 1"

I will have my Nikon Digital Camera in the pack, but other than that I am looking for recommendations. I will be in “civilized areas” almost exclusively, except for the odd Guided Jungle Trek. I am concerned about carrying anything that would obviously be a weapon, because the security can at times be tight there and would hate to get into trouble with the powers that be (what with recent coupes and all). Other than that I am completely open to your suggestions and recommendations – I do have a short list myself (floating in my head currently but will post it soon):

Thanks in advance for your input.

--CavalierX
Link Posted: 8/14/2007 3:44:24 PM EDT
--DAILY TRAVEL PACK LIST-- for the MaxPak (though some would be pocketed)

- Copy of Passport (Laminated Color Copy with Emergency Contact info on Back)
- Cash (around $100 Walking Around Money)
- One Credit Card – One Debit Card – Travelers Check
- Digital Camera
- Cell Phone
- Surefire G2Z or C3 (probably the G2Z for weight, but the C3 is nice as a Back-up)
- 2 Extra CR123 Batteries
- 2 Pens
- Quick Reference Home Made Phrase Pad of Key Words/Phrases THAI and English
- Tiny First Aid Pack (bandaids, wipes, Tylenol, Imodium AD, Pepto Tabs, Benadryl)
- Leatherman Micro (small enough to be non-threatening- yet useful)
- LED Micro-Light
- 20ft. Para-chord
- 4, 6” cable ties
- Small Bottle Purell
- 4 Wet-One single packs (for TP if need be)
- 3 Grimloc D-Rings
- 1 Bic Lighter
- Zip Fizz Beverage Powder
- AND ???...????

The list is growing… slowly

Feedback??

Link Posted: 8/14/2007 5:14:11 PM EDT
Condoms.

Colonel Hurtz
Link Posted: 8/14/2007 5:58:04 PM EDT


- Copies of your passport including your visa stamps/stickers (one in each bag you take, including your day pack and money belt/wallet)

- A Sharpie

- A baggie with some clean, damp lens wipes

- Cash, credit cards, and driver's license but leave your CCW at home

- A pocket guide/phrasebook covering the language or lingua franca of the area

- A bottle of iodine tabs in case you get stuck buying bottled water that seems suspect to you (and do look in each bottle you buy, check for turbidity/sediment when you swirl it, check the tamper seal on the cap, etc. Some merchants will refill and resell these with tap water in some places.)

- Cash-- get some local currency as soon as you arrive (or better yet in London, Paris, or Tokyo before you arrive) and keep a small roll or $1 USD bills on your person easily accessible. This is for tips and gifts. Keep this separate from you emergency cash which should also be kept secure on your person at all times along with your passport.

- Levaquin or cipro in case you start getting sick, immodium in case you're sick when you have to travel (don't use it otherwise), and your antimalarial med. Benadryl and your epipen if you have any severe allergies.

Honestly, if I were you I wouldn't carry a tactical or .mil-looking pack. That's all I can think of at the moment.

Link Posted: 8/14/2007 6:54:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/14/2007 7:05:53 PM EDT
Leatherman Wave, Surefire E2D or 6P, emergency poncho, lighter, pad and fisher space pen, small first aid kit.
Spare glasses or contacts, and my IPOD. Give or take some items.... thats whats in mine!
Link Posted: 8/14/2007 7:18:31 PM EDT
If there is a clear ID pocket put your multi-lingual card in it so that it can be seen, with the
message "Open me, emergency info inside" in the languages below. If you've never been to
Thailand, you'll be surprised by the number of languages you hear on the street. You would
be well served to have one page of Thai, Burmese, Cambodian, Lao, Vietnamese, French,
Dutch, Japanese, and (yes) Arabic. 5 cards printed front and back for a total of 10
languages including English. Include emergency contact, blood type, allergies, medial
conditions, religious preference, and a short, simple, straight forward instructions regarding
resuscitation and extraordinary measures. All that info fits neatly on a 3X5 Card and I've
never had any problem getting students at a local college to help me with them, though
Burmese can be kind of tough. If you can set up an emergency contact that is not a family
member or can serve as a relay to your family, you may want to consider going that route as
kidnapping for fun and profit is still a popular pastime in some places

Have fun and if you get the chance to feed bananas to a baby elephant, do it!
Link Posted: 8/14/2007 7:18:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2007 7:26:13 PM EDT by bluebayou]
Sounds great. I spent 7 days hiking and train riding in Italy, 1/3 of the world away, but.....

My lessons learned were:
Security guys expect to see suitcases (I just had small backpack), were suspicious of me leaving Italy and entering US, spend a lot of time getting searched
Don't wear military style clothing (was wearing field jacket for pockets, was in winter)--see above

Carry toothbrush on person
Carry passport and copy on person (kept paper copy in paperback book with some cash)

Carry extra socks and underwear in bag
Deck of cards
Paperback book, standing in lines sucks
Bus or train tickets, maps of bus lines
Small notebook and pen
Imodium, Pepto, and mild laxative (could go either way), keep packaging on them
Plastic baggies (cards, socks, papers in separate)


Less extra clothes the better, IMHO, wash clothes at hotels, don't know local conditions, but the sink is your bathing friend

I would NOT take a flashy flashlight like a Surefire, sure they are cool, but you are begging for it to be taken in my opinion, not that the Thai aren't friendly people, but.......customs is customs where ever you are.....Spain has some friendly people though.......
Hope that something helps
Link Posted: 8/14/2007 7:54:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ColonelHurtz:
Condoms.

Colonel Hurtz


+1

You dirty farang.

Watch your 6 in Phnom Penh.

Are you traveling alone?
Link Posted: 8/14/2007 8:47:34 PM EDT
don't tip the katowe.
mpi
Link Posted: 8/14/2007 9:44:42 PM EDT
I don't think anyone has mentioned those plastic packages of tissue...I suggest several of these...you definitely will use these as TP...

Some parts of Asia do not provide TP in their public restrooms...Also, if you're not used to it...learn how to squat when you crap. Try not crapping on yourself or having your pants lay in the crap....Have Fun
Link Posted: 8/14/2007 11:07:22 PM EDT
This is what I usually carry in my bag when traveling outside the US.

Gerber multi tool
Silva Ranger Ultra compass, it can also be used as a signal mirror.
Surefire, usually a G2. My E2O is usualyl clipped to my pocket
First aid kit to include a couple days worth of Keflex, band aids, antibiotic ointment, several 4x4 guaze pads, medical tape, battle dressing, eye injury kit, butterfly bandages and a suture kit.
Note pad
two pens
pencil
Sharpie
white, permanent, write on anything grease pencil
Map of the area
two half liter bottles of water
travel pack of baby wipes
small bottle of hand sanitizer
extra clean socks, nice to have and can also be used to bandage a large wound.
small red LED
1/3 of a VS-17 panel if I'm in the wilderness or the outskirts of town
Chewing gum
Pack of Marlboro cigarettes. Even though I quit smoking it's a good way to butter people up. Most non American smokers love American cigarettes.
Lighter
Flask of scotch. Another way to butter up some people. That and I love scotch.
4 Power Bars
Copy of my documents
Cash
a couple of 1 gallon ziploc bags.
The name of my hotel written in the local language. Or int he case ofsome countries the language of the majority of the cab drivers.

The last time I spent more than a day in a foreign country (on vacation not work) my kid was still in diapers. I used my brand new Blackhawk Battle Bag. It was perfect as a diaper bag and I used the mag pouches for bottles of water and juice. It ended up being the only diaper bag we used the entire time.

There's more stuff but I can't think of it now.

Link Posted: 8/14/2007 11:36:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/15/2007 4:52:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2007 5:00:46 AM EDT by Bubbatheredneck]



Originally Posted By CavalierX:
--DAILY TRAVEL PACK LIST-- for the MaxPak (though some would be pocketed)

- Copy of Passport (Laminated Color Copy with Emergency Contact info on Back) I would also suggest 2 or 3 notarized copies to hand to officials (other than customs at the airport) if anyone wants to see your papers. Common trick to take your passport and need a 'fee' to hand it back. Keep one copy in your money belt, hidden.

- Cash (around $100 Walking Around Money) need more
- One Credit Card – One Debit Card – Travelers Check
- Digital Camera
- Cell Phone Buy local SIM card
- Surefire G2Z or C3 (probably the G2Z for weight, but the C3 is nice as a Back-up)
- 2 Extra CR123 Batteries

- 2 Pens just need one. How many critical pen failures have you had?
- Quick Reference Home Made Phrase Pad of Key Words/Phrases THAI and English
- Tiny First Aid Pack (bandaids, wipes, Tylenol, Imodium AD, Pepto Tabs, Benadryl)
- Leatherman Micro (small enough to be non-threatening- yet useful) I prefer a SAK, but that is okay
- LED Micro-Light
- 20ft. Para-chord
- 4, 6” cable ties
- Small Bottle Purell
- 4 Wet-One single packs (for TP if need be)
- 3 Grimloc D-Rings
- 1 Bic Lighter
- Zip Fizz Beverage Powder
- AND ???...????

The list is growing… slowly

Feedback??



A small bit of duct tape is a good addition.

I carry a Katydn bottle/ purifier. Fill at a faucet, sip bug free water.

A new street crime in third world countries is taking empty water bottles, refilling and glueing the cap down with a hot glue gun. You get the "crack" when you open it, reassuring you it is a "new" bottle of water.

Swiss Army Knife. So common, not viewed as a threat.

Ditch the SF, take a Gerber infinity ultra. Much lighter.

Too many batteries to carry every day.

+1 on Purell and TP

Need way more cash to carry. Carry $500+ in a money belt. I have the Eagle Creek one that is great, but the buckle is prone to fail. I need to replace it before my next trip before it does.

Clean water, cash, a SAK and TP.....the world is your oyster.


Link Posted: 8/15/2007 4:52:27 AM EDT
Some other thoughts:
TP
Purell or some sort of hand sanitizer
Wet Wipes in a travel size pack
Meds, advil, tums, etc
Duct Tape wrapped around a pencil. I wrap it around a water bottle or around one of those orange waterproof match cases at Walmart (which fits 2 CR123A batteries perfect).
Spork
Ipod
Deck of cards
Write in Rain Notepad
Fischer Space Travel Pen



Get a bunch of old keys and put them on a keyring, get a long lanyard (like a badge holder that goes around the neck). Put the keys on one end, tie the other end in a small ball so it doesn't slip out of the hand. Now you have a keyring impact weapon.
Link Posted: 8/15/2007 8:03:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2007 8:06:01 AM EDT by Hartmann]
<---- From someone who has traveled a lot in Asia & SE Asia:

Be aware that one of your biggest threats/problems will be pickpockets, who are masterful at getting into even locked backpacks that the smelly hippy children from US/UK/NZ/Australia/Canada/EU tend to carry with them around Asia. So, keep your bag locked & on you as much as possible and watch your 6.

I agree too with being low profile...meaning, do not wear anything mil or LE looking. Just look like a nice harmless tourist. A dirty old backpack will attract less thief attention than a brand new Kifaru.

You can bring a knife if you want, but be aware that if you are searched it could cause problems for you.

If you bring medicines, be sure they are in prescription bottles with your name on them. Be aware that things like Sudafed cannot be purchased OTC in many countries and may not be allowed (though I doubt you'll be tossed in jail for having it).

Someone above recommended having a bunch of $1 US dollars on you...maybe he meant $100 US bills. A bunch of $1 bills are bulky and won't get you much, but $20, $50 or $100 definitely will. In Vietnam the currency exchangers would give you lower rates if you exchanged $20, and better rates if you exchanged $100 bills instead.

Another thing: Smile a lot. Despite what you see on the news, people around the world generally like Americans, and in my experience it is because we have a positive outlook on life. A smile and a "oh gosh I'm sorry" expression can cover a lot of cultural transgressions, especially in SE Asia.

Have fun, SE Asian people are the nicest in the world.
Link Posted: 8/15/2007 10:44:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Hartmann:


Another thing: Smile a lot. Despite what you see on the news, people around the world generally like Americans, and in my experience it is because we have a positive outlook on life. A smile and a "oh gosh I'm sorry" expression can cover a lot of cultural transgressions, especially in SE Asia.



Big plus one.

Act like a guest and most folks will like you. I have been amazed at how welcoming many people in the world are to Americans. Unfortunately, the rude American stereotype has a factual basis.

Link Posted: 8/15/2007 9:31:50 PM EDT

There is some really great responses here... and some very good information.

I am consolidating my list and will post and updated version soon.

Thanks again for the input-- keep it coming.

--CavX
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 7:55:03 AM EDT
UPDATED!!

--DAILY CARRY TRAVEL PACK LIST—

- Maxpedition Versapack in Black (AKA Manbag or Murse)
- Eagle Creek Money Belt (with cash travelers checks and color copy of passport)
- Drop Wallet small bills and tip money.
- Copy of Passport (Laminated with Emergency Contact and Medical info on Back)
- Cash (around $200 Walking Around Money- $100 kept in Money Belt)
- One Credit Card – One Debit Card – Travelers Checks (
- Digital Camera and
- Set of Extra AA Batteries
- Cell Phone
- Surefire G2Z
- 2 Extra CR123 Batteries
- 1 Pens, 1 Sharpie
- Small Notebook
- Quick Reference Home Made Phrase Pad of Key Words/Phrases
- Tiny First Aid Pack (bandaids, wipes, Tylenol, Imodium AD, Pepto Tabs, Benadryl)
- Leatherman Micro (small enough to be non-threatening- yet useful)
- LED Micro-Light on Leatherman Micro
- 20ft. Para-chord
- 4, 6” cable ties
- Small Bottle Purell
- 4 Wet-One single packs (for TP if need be)
- 2 Grimloc D-Rings (small plastic locking D rings)
- 1 Bic Lighter
- Zip Fizz Beverage Powder
- 2 Packets of EmergenC
- Condoms
- Iodine tabs
- Pre-Paid Phone credit card (ATT)
-Cinnamon LISTERINE POCKETPAKS® Breath Strips
- 2 Quart Ziplock Baggies
- Small Tube DEET 30% Repellent Gel
- Hard Candies (small handful)
- 2 business cards from Hotel with directions on back in local-language
- Streamlight LED Baton Light – with some old keys
- Still undecided about carrying a knife (I may buy one from a vendor if I see them for sale openly)

I think this will fill my pockets and Man-bag. Next step will be to get it all together and pack it up seeing how it fits. I am thinking there might be some slim down. If it is just way too much and I fill like I am making too many compromises I also have a DevilDog Maxpedition Pack that is much larger, but was trying to avoid taking it be cause it may be too big and look too militaristic. We will see.

-CavX
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 8:05:42 AM EDT
When I am in the Ukraine, I ALWAYS keep Imodium, and Ibuprofen in the bag also. Mainly the Imodium. Like TJ said, be careful of that local food.

Doc
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 9:16:36 AM EDT


Be sure to post a pic.

Dang that sure looks like too much stuff, but it surely might not be, and a pic (and a weight) will be nice to see.

And be double sure to do a AAR about what you finally took, what was needed and what wasn't.

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