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Posted: 7/20/2008 10:13:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 12:16:50 PM EDT by Subconscious]
Yesterday the family and I were up in the mountains having a fun day out. We hiked around Chimney Rock in the morning, and went to a little gem place in the afternoon - the kind of place where you buy a bag of dirt and sort it in a little sluice to find "gems". I'm a geologist, and the kids have sort of grown to be rocks hounds too. It's fun and we all enjoy it.

Anyway, as we were doing our thing at the sluice, my oldest daughter (who is 9) was stung by a hornet. No big deal, we thought. She's been stung by bees before, and she handled it pretty well - no drama, etc. My wife took her up to the car to put something on it.

Less than five minutes later, my wife came back down and asked if I had any benadryl - my daughter was getting hives. I went back up to check her and search for benadryl. She said she had a headache - and it hurt worse than the bee sting. She was literally covered in hives - hundreds of them. Just like that. She had been stung on the leg. The hives had started on her legs and quickly spread up her torso and were starting on her arms as I searched for benadryl. Very quickly spreading.

I had no benadryl, so I asked the gem guy if there was a pharmacy around anywhere. I still wasn't convinced anything was seriously wrong. Just a bee sting, and now she had some hives. The gem guy told me there was a grocery store about seven minutes up the road. We headed for the store.

As we were pulling out of the gem place, my daughter said her throat was getting scratchy, and the hives had spread to her face. It began to dawn on the wife and I that this was not a normal bee sting. Something was wrong. I tore out of there and sped to the grocery store. I decided that the grocery store parking lot would be easier for an ambulance to find than me parked on the side of the road somewhere up in the mountains. We planned for the wife to take her inside, get her some benadryl, and see what the pharmacist said about her condition. Call an ambulance then if it was called for.

At the store, the pharmacist gave her a benadryl and told us there was a doctor's office about 10 minutes up the road, it was open, and it was closer than the hospital. He called them and told them we were on the way. I tore out of the parking lot, squealing tires on every curve through the mountains toward the doctors office. The benadryl seemed to slow the progression of the hives and her breathing problems, but her responses to us were becoming slow and she wasn't making much sense. Her lips and ears were swelling up.

We got to the doctor's office about 20 minutes after she had been stung. They were waiting for us out front. My daughter was able to walk in - barely. They took her stats, and immediately gave her an epinephrine injection. Her pulse and blood pressure were through the roof, and her O2 levels were falling. We had literally made it in the nick of time. A few more minutes and things would have gotten very, very bad for us.

The doc monitored her for about two hours. She responded very well to the epi shot, and almost immediately showed signs of improvement. The hives started reducing, her heart rate and blood pressure came down, the swelling reduced, her breathing got better. She was going to be ok - and it was only through God's good graces. It was amazing that we were close enough to a store to get some benadryl in her. Even more so that the pharmacist knew of the doctor's office - open on Saturday afternoon in the middle of nowhere in the mountains. I have said many prayers of thanks, and I'm not done yet.

Any of you with children - get some benadryl and always carry it. We had no idea my daughter was allergic to bee stings. She had been stung before, as recently as this summer, with no serious effects. The shock came on almost immediately, but we didn't realize what we were seeing was symptoms of anaphylactic shock. We didn't realize it was a life threatening situation until she was mere minutes away from being in critical condition - or worse.

We're taking her to the family doctor tomorrow for a follow-up and to see if we need to get and carry one of those personal epi shots. In the mean time, we have benadryl sitting on the counter, and my daughter has been getting a lot of attention. The hives are gone, but her skin is still red where they were. The spot where the hornet stung her is inflamed and red, larger than the bottom of a coke can. She complains that the spot they gave her the shot hurts more than anything else right now.

Study up on the symptoms of anaphylactic shock, and look for it - expect it with kids and bee stings. I almost lost my daughter!
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 10:17:54 AM EDT
Thoughtful post and
Glad your child is OK
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 10:19:32 AM EDT
Holy crap, dude. If my kid wasn't napping right now, I'd be squeezing the bejesus out of her. GOOD INSTINCTS and GOOD DECISIONS on your part! You're daughter is beyond lucky to have you as a dad.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 10:29:55 AM EDT
Man, thank god she's ok.

I have a cousin who is allergic to bee stings. First time he got stung he had a similar experience to your daughter's and almost died. Pretty scary.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 10:40:00 AM EDT
This is why I carry Epinephrine and Epi-pens in my Gear...
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 10:49:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GUNSFORHIRE:
This is why I carry Epinephrine and Epi-pens in my Gear...


Me too.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 10:49:36 AM EDT
I had a reaction to a bee sting myself a few years ago when camping. Through dumb luck, I picked up some Benedryl and popped a double dose. The Benedryl relaxed the reaction significantly and knocked me out. Took me about 24 hours to get to feeling alright. I need to get an epi-injector for the next time I get stung...

Glad your daughter is alright.

-David
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 10:57:54 AM EDT
how does someone get their hands on s epi-pen
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:01:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dunndw:
how does someone get their hands on s epi-pen



+1..

I dont have any issues with bee stings, but MANY ppl do, be nice to have something that may help.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:03:43 AM EDT
Thank God your daughter is OK. That was close.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:09:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dunndw:
how does someone get their hands on s epi-pen


yeah....what he said.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:13:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dunndw:
how does someone get their hands on s epi-pen


It helps that Im an Rn and NREMT-P...but ask your Doc...Most have
no problems writing for an Epipen, Especially if you have a history
of Anaphalaxis..
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:30:00 AM EDT

Guys,
I carry an epinephrine autoinjector anytime I'm working outside or traveling outside the States. I've carried Epipens, but recently switched to Twinjects because they are a bit smaller, a bit lighter, and carry two doses in each pen. The carrying case also comes with a pocket clip, which I know is probably a silly thing to care about, but I really do like being able to clip it into my pocket or a backpack organizer panel. Our insurance covered them just like an epipen, and our local pharmacy had them on the shelf.

For those planning to use epi for anaphylactic shock, remember that as soon as you notice symptoms (or realize you've been exposed to whatever allergen does it to you) you need to take your benadryl. The epi is a 15 minute fix to what can be a several-hour problem. It treats the symptoms of anaphylactic shock, not the cause. The benadryl, however, helps to reduce the severity of the allergic reaction. So always carry benadryl with your epipen and take it first, preferably before even the first symptom rears its ugly head. If you wait too long to take the benadryl you may not be able to swallow to take it.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:31:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dunndw:
how does someone get their hands on s epi-pen



I just got one the other day, after having a reaction to a bee sting for the first time in my life at 36 years old. I accidentally broke open a beehive while using an outdoor shower at my brother's place in North Carolina, and had to do an amazing feat of naked gymnastics and bee swatting when like 30 of them came flying at my big fat naked ass.


The only solid sting was on my hand, but it developed cellulitis and was really swollen, hot, and red, and spreading. My doc gave me Prednisone and antibiotics, which did the trick, and he called the Epi-Pen in to the drug store for me.

Thing is, usually it's the second sting that kills you. I had a mild reaction this time, but I've been stung a dozen times before and never reacted at all, so I'm worried about the next one.

I'm an EMT-B, working on EMT-P and then RN, but anyone can use the Epi-Pen, it's really easy. Just ask your doctor for one.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:51:54 AM EDT
Thank all that is good your daughter is well. I hope she's back up to speed. Glad you were working it through logically and acted without hesitation.

+1 on having benadryl aka: diphenhydramine. Also get a "primatine mist" asthma inhaler

Epenephrine is found in OTC "primatine mist" , just be sure to read the ingredients to verify. It's about $10-$12 and requires no prescription. If the patient is able to breathe well about 2-3 big inhalations is a good dose till real medical help is on the way. It will also raise her heart rate respitory rate and BP too , not a heart patient , don't worry - monitor. Use the inhaler , eat the Benadryl and get to monitoring/medical help.

-JC

Link Posted: 7/20/2008 12:01:58 PM EDT
I'm so glad she's ok - we carry benadryl all the time, just in case...

thank God that doctor was open and that the pharmacist knew that...

please give her an extra hug from us...
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 12:13:36 PM EDT
If you're allergic to bees/wasps, get and carry an epi autoinjector, Benadryl/diphenhydramine, AND Tagamet/cimetidine. The diphenhydramine and cimetidine are both antihistamines, diphenhydramine works on H2 and cimetidine works on H2 (maybe the other way around). Those three things are at the very front of the med pouch of my EDC.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:08:19 PM EDT
epipens require a prescription in the US
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:25:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 1:30:28 PM EDT by Mid-Tenn]

Originally Posted By GUNSFORHIRE:
This is why I carry Epinephrine and Epi-pens in my Gear...




ditto....


along with injectable and oral benadryl and an injectable (solu-medrol) steroid.

Very glad your daughter is doing OK. As you already know anaphylaxis is the real deal when it comes to life threatening medical conditions.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 1:37:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 4:57:58 PM EDT
Good that you got her to the docs in time. I'm going to put this in big bold letters for everyone to see

IF YOU NEED TO CARRY EPINEPHRINE YOU NEED TO HAVE 2 DOSES WITH YOU AT ALL TIMES

If a person has a really bad reaction to a bee sting and you need to give them one, it is possible they may need another shot again.

Listen very carefully to the doctors instructions as to when to administer the epi, if you give it when you don't need to you can kill you daughter very easily.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 6:13:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By K1rodeoboater:
Good that you got her to the docs in time. I'm going to put this in big bold letters for everyone to see

IF YOU NEED TO CARRY EPINEPHRINE YOU NEED TO HAVE 2 DOSES WITH YOU AT ALL TIMES

If a person has a really bad reaction to a bee sting and you need to give them one, it is possible they may need another shot again.

Listen very carefully to the doctors instructions as to when to administer the epi, if you give it when you don't need to you can kill you daughter very easily.


not really
Of course you need to make sure you know when to give it. In my experience and reading, most disasters regarding emergency use of epi are underestimating the seriousness of the situation and delaying the administration of epi. Denial of the seriousness of a situation is very common. Re-read the OP.



Link Posted: 7/20/2008 6:41:29 PM EDT
Many times when you get stung by an insect you're allergic to, the very first sting and sometimes even the second won't produce a reaction. It's the subsequent ones that are a bitch.

My dad is allergic to bees. Two years ago, a bee stung me in the throat (unprovoked; little fucker.). Now I'm worried about bee stings.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 7:00:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 7:02:17 PM EDT by K1rodeoboater]

Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:
not really
Of course you need to make sure you know when to give it. In my experience and reading, most disasters regarding emergency use of epi are underestimating the seriousness of the situation and delaying the administration of epi. Denial of the seriousness of a situation is very common. Re-read the OP.


I did read the OP...I've also known people who have gotten stung and the min it happens want to whip out the epi and stick themselves with it before any onset of symptoms occur other than the irritation at the sting site. I only give epi to someone if they're beginning to have trouble breathing, prior to that I'm keeping an eye on them for their symptoms to get worse. Hives are annoying, but if they stay localized it's not really an issue. Spreading hives become a concern, even more so if they're spreading very rapidly (like in the OP's situation). If you have time to get to a doctor and the hives are spreading slowly then that would be a better COA, though once it progresses past the point of hives it's time for epi.

I've also had the very pleasant experience of having someone think they got stung by a bee when really it was a bug bite, they wanted epi right then and there. Obviously it wasn't needed since it was a bug bite that caused localized itching that was further irritated by the patients scratching.

anyways the point is...if someone gets stung, even if they're not known for a history of anaphylaxis, it's a good idea to monitor them for a while anyways just to be sure

Oh yeah...OP....get a med alert bracelet for her
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 7:01:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 7:01:33 PM EDT by Shooter7]
Since epi-pens are expensive and require a trip to the doctor (also expensive), I did a little research on the inhalers for those on a budget. While this is not necessarily reliable, here's a quote from one website on the inhalers:

"What about an adrenaline (epinephrine) inhaler?
Adrenaline (epinephrine) inhalers seemed a good option in the past. There was good evidence that they could work, but the inhaler to which this applied has been withdrawn.

In March 2000 Dr. F. E. Simons of Winnipeg, Canada, presented clear evidence at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) conference in the USA that the current ones do not work, and in October 2000 she backed this up with further detail. Since right now we are only aware of adrenaline (epinephrine) inhalers from one manufacturer, whose products were the ones used in this research, we believe that currently available adrenaline (epinephrine) inhalers do not work and that at best you must never rely on them. We do not currently issue such inhalers to our patients and do not renew the prescriptions of patients who have such inhalers which go out of date.

If you have such an inhaler, we urge you to consult your allergy specialist about it. Please remember that throughout these web pages what we write is not intended as individual medical advice but as information of possible interest to you, and that your treatment should be determined by your own doctor or properly qualified health professional.

In any case, even if they are capable of working, inhalers will only help if you use them correctly. A nurse or doctor should make sure you have got the technique right. Obviously an inhaler won't work if you can't breathe well enough because of your reaction. If your reactions look as if they might be life-threatening then an inhaler alone not adequate; you need an injection kit."


Link
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 7:18:47 PM EDT
Really glad your daughter is ok.


Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:13:19 AM EDT
Thanks for all the kind words and thoughts, and advice and tips. I really appreciate it.

The big points to remember are:

1) Anyone can develop a severe allergic reaction, even if they've been stung before.

2) Anaphylactic shock sets in very quickly, and you need to know the symptoms.

3) Carry benadryl at all times if you have a concern about it.

We'll know more about the epi pens, etc. after her follow-up visit with the family doctor.

She's doing just fine now. She went to play at her friend's house yesterday, bees be damned.

Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:15:32 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 6:24:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Feral:

Originally Posted By red_on_black:
The epi is a 15 minute fix to what can be a several-hour problem. It treats the symptoms of anaphylactic shock, not the cause.


This is worth repeating and understanding.

If you ever need to give yourself, a loved one, or even a stranger a dose of epi, you need to be beating feet toward definitive medical care. Epi wears off quickly and the airway compromise that necessitated the shot in the first place can return.


Quoted again for emphasis. Epipens are a short term, as in 10-15 minutes, treatment. Use them with Benadryl while en route to medical assistance. If you will be out in the boonies, carry several of them with you.

Be aware that it is somewhat temperature-sensitive also. Store it properly.

www.epipen.com/pdf/ord.fm.pdf
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 7:25:32 AM EDT
Glad your kiddo made it thru ok! Whew! My DH is bee allergic & he has epipens & benadryl & tagamet available.

I recomment you get several Bison Tubes (spy capsules) and every family member carry one. Load it with some benadryl & tagamet. You can usually carry 3-5 in a small tube.

EDCDepot
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 8:02:46 AM EDT
Good advice. My wife is allergic to wasp/ bees.

Glad you could get ahead of it.

Glad your girl is OK.

Stay safe.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:25:07 AM EDT
Since I read this thread last night I have researching this via the web. It seems that most prescribed treatments without access to EpiPen is Benadryl and Zantac. In this thread it seems that Tagamet is a favorite. In the research I have found today most researchers prefer Zantac because:

1. Less likely to have other drug interactions than Tagamet.
2. No child studies/ dosage recommendation for children.

If using for a child make sure you can do the math because the Zantac dosage is based on weight.

I would like to hear from those who have Tagamet in their supply as to why they made the choice over Zantac. I am not being critical just trying to learn.

AccurateOne
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 2:44:36 PM EDT
Get her to a Board Certified Allergist ASAP!!
Don't rely on GP's or FP's.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:14:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 4:15:59 PM EDT by ROMAD-556]
It has been posted here before by a couple others that the OTC Primetene Mist inhalers are similar to the prescription only Epipen. Obviously the airway would have to be open for this to work. Epipen delivers 0.3mg, Epipen jr delivers 0.15mg while PM inhaler delivers 0.22mg so it isnt exactly the same dosage.

I've been stung by bees many times and never had any problems but I do keep Benydryl and PM inhaler in the FAK "just in case" - these stories of allergic reactions are always eye openers.

Obviously if you are high risk - get the epipens and know how to use them. If your not high risk then this may be an option for you to consider.

Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:22:06 PM EDT
Update:

Today we had to do the normal doctor visit to get the referral to the allergist routine, copays for everyone! She has an appointment at the allergist Friday. The family doc went ahead and issued us a prescription for the epi pen in case we needed it in the mean time. Two single-use injectors in individual water proof carrying containers plus one inert "trainer" so we can teach her and others how to use it. Cost was $30 with insurance.

The epi pens are a little large in their water proof containers, about 5 inches long, slightly larger than 1/2 inch diameter tapering up in size to a cap close to 3/4 inch in diameter. It won't be exactly convenient for a 9 year old girl to carry around. We're going to get her a little fanny pack or something for it, and put some benadryl in it too in another water proof container. We also have a medic alert bracelet on order. They have some "fancy" ones, and she is excited about getting something that might pass for jewelry.

It's been a very sobering experience. One bee sting away from disaster - that takes some getting used to.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:31:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 4:36:54 PM EDT by LordStrider]
Glad to hear your child is ok. I've been there....done that.

For me it is Soy Proteins. I've been fine all my life until the last 4 years. Now Raviolis will kill me. They close up my airway and give me severe hives. My first bout was Christmas day '04, and it's been a learning experience since. I really suspect the genetic modification of soy crops is probably to blame.

Now that I know what to avoid I am generally ok, but have gotten nailed on occasion. Once a hamburger bun that had soy flour and another on a calcium supplement that had soy isoflavone something....go figure a vitamin that could kill you. I even have to limit what MRE's I get as well as Mountain House #10 cans.

Now I religiously read all packages and my Epi and benadryl are just as close as my XD. Don't leave home without them.

It can be a very harrowing experience.....good to hear all is ok
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 4:57:58 PM EDT
Great information. A guy I work with got stung or bit by something the other day, had an allergic reaction, and ended up going to the Urgent Care Center. His was nowhere near as serious as your story was but it reminded me that I needed to put some Benadryl in our First Aid Kit for work and the one I keep in my Truck. He said the Doctor he saw recommended that everyone keep Benadryl in ther First Aid Kits.

Hope your daughter stays well and you never go through that again.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 6:07:04 PM EDT
Sub, thank God your daughter is OK...no doubt your quick reaction had a big hand in it...

You should be proud of yourself-you stayed cool in the crisis, and saved your daughter's life. Also, the info provided has informed me if I'm in the same situation (though I don't have kids) I at least know what course of action I need to take.

+1

Link Posted: 7/21/2008 6:32:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 6:33:52 PM EDT by fish223]

Originally Posted By ROMAD-556:
It has been posted here before by a couple others that the OTC Primetene Mist inhalers are similar to the prescription only Epipen. Obviously the airway would have to be open for this to work. Epipen delivers 0.3mg, Epipen jr delivers 0.15mg while PM inhaler delivers 0.22mg so it isnt exactly the same dosage.

I've been stung by bees many times and never had any problems but I do keep Benydryl and PM inhaler in the FAK "just in case" - these stories of allergic reactions are always eye openers.

Obviously if you are high risk - get the epipens and know how to use them. If your not high risk then this may be an option for you to consider.



epi is one of the few drugs that can be delivered directly to the lungs for systemic uptake, but epi needs to make it ALL the way into the lungs to be absorbed. (it is a remnant of the ACLS protocol for putting drugs down the tube when IV access has not been obtained.) the inhaler is NOT a good choice if the airway is compromised, and as mentioned in an earlier post, proven ineffective.

get injectible epi, keep it handy, and rotate it if unused, especially if kept in an unstable environment


oh yeah: glad everything worked out well.
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 2:34:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rxdawg:

Be aware that it is somewhat temperature-sensitive also. Store it properly.

www.epipen.com/pdf/ord.fm.pdf


Wow! Temperature sensitive indeed. What in the world is meant by "excursions" to 59-86 degrees F? A week? An hour? Five minutes? How much potency is lost? This doesn't sound like much of an answer for my intended use - FAK kept in the car. Interior temps can easily exceed 100 degrees F in the summer sun.
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 3:25:06 PM EDT
In Package Inserts, "excursion" is an extremely vague word. The general assumption at my hospital is that the oral meds will be good for a week at 90 degrees. It'd probably last longer, but, well, if the pharmacy stay that warm for much longer, the S has seriously HTF, and we'll either need to move out of Florida because it's sinking, or our wholesaler will be getting a huge order when the A/C's back on.

On the other hand, an acceptable "excursion" for some of the more sensitive IV drugs is less then 1 hour before they start to denature.
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 4:04:07 PM EDT
Kind of a dumb question. Just what Benadryl to buy and carry ? I was looking at some yesterday and Benadryl has a half dozen different products out.
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 4:05:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2008 4:07:12 PM EDT by Subconscious]
Yes, the Epi Pens are temperature sensitive. The one she's carrying with her goes to a lot of extremes, just over the course of her day. One stays inside, in AC all the time. We'll just have to rotate stock periodically.

Still waiting on the allergist appointment.

ETA: the caplets come in foil wraps that can be trimmed down and carried in a little keychain pill carrier. We've got 'em all over the place now.
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 4:33:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By XM21Nick:
Kind of a dumb question. Just what Benadryl to buy and carry ? I was looking at some yesterday and Benadryl has a half dozen different products out.



Just look for diphenhydramine, generic for Benadryl. You don't have to get the name brand, just make sure that is the only active ingredient(no decongestants, cough suppressants, etc.)
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 5:48:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2008 5:52:42 PM EDT by Mr_Psmith]

Originally Posted By Subconscious:
Yes, the Epi Pens are temperature sensitive. The one she's carrying with her goes to a lot of extremes, just over the course of her day. One stays inside, in AC all the time. We'll just have to rotate stock periodically.

Still waiting on the allergist appointment.

ETA: the caplets come in foil wraps that can be trimmed down and carried in a little keychain pill carrier. We've got 'em all over the place now.


I'm really glad your daughter is okay.

The allergist may cover this, but please allow me to do some teaching:

Hymenoptera envenomations can be life-threatening, as you discovered. The order Hymenoptera includes bees (honeybees and bumblebees), wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, fire ants, bullet ants (well, all ants actually). The order is divided into families. Bees are a member of the Apidae family, while the other winged buggers are members of the Vespidae family.

There is strong cross-reactivity within families, but not between families. That is to say, if you are allergic to a honeybee sting, you are highly likely to be allergic to a bumblebee sting, but not any more likely than anyone else to be allergic to a wasp sting. On the other hand, if you are allergic to stings from members of family Vespidae, you could be stung by a Bee with no problem (as your daughter apparently had been in the past) , yet be deathly allergic to a hornet sting (as your daughter apparently was).

Interesting, at least. Again, I'm so glad she's ok.


eta: as another member pointed out, you can carry an H1 blocker (benadryl) AND an H2 blocker (tagamet/cimetidine), although I would favor using Zantac/Ranitidine. It is available OTC.
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 6:49:50 PM EDT

I was curious, so I called RiteAid and they charge $84 for one Epi pen.

So if you don't have insurance, they are a little pricey.

Link Posted: 8/18/2008 7:03:25 PM EDT
Wow. Glad to hear your daughter is okay. Could have turned out much worse if you were not able to seek help so quickly. She was not likely experiencing anaphylactic shock yet, since her BP was elevated, but was probably headed that way based on the symptoms you described. As to the poster who suggested that benadryl be taken prior to the epi, that is incorrect. For a true anaphylactic reaction, proper protocol would be 1.) epi 2)benadryl 3) coritcosteroid
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 7:10:07 PM EDT
Thank God your daughter is ok, I'm sure you are doing that though.

I stepped on a nest of yellow jackets while golfing in North Carolina a few years ago. Major shock ensued, the doctors were not sure how many times I had been stung my upper body was covered in stings. Were it not for 911 I would not be here. I get it about the blood pressure heart rate thing in the ER one of the nurses called out blood pressure 0 pulse 180! I freaked. Took abut four hours to get me stable. Thank God for EMT's, Paramedics, Doctors and nurses.

I had been allergic to bee stings but my doctor said after an event like that I am now more at risk than before. So I carry the epi pens in my car/ backpack ect... It may well be the same for your daughter unfortunately.

Again, really glad she is ok and good job getting here help ASAP. The minutes really drag on when you can't breathe.
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 7:20:30 PM EDT
Can you get analphytic shock from eating an insurance representative-ie Gecko?

Link Posted: 8/18/2008 8:08:28 PM EDT
The damn bees sting without being provoked. I've been stung 3 times just out of the blue. The last time was at a rest area on the highway in Arizona standing in front of a soda machine.

Glad your daughter's OK.
Link Posted: 8/18/2008 9:38:49 PM EDT
Glad your daughter is ok. You did a great job of staying calm and getting it done.
I also have had this happen from a shrimp allergy. I was not always allergic though, the doc told me after we figured out what happend that your allergies change every 7 years some times marginally some time dramaticly. I ate shrimp all my life, untill that day about 10 years ago. Now i can have a reaction by just handling them, eyes swell up, lips swell up. only had my throat swell twice, The first time it happened and about 2 months ago. The weird thing is that the last time i didnt eat any shrimp but had fajait's (sp) at the mexican place. We think it was because of them cooking on the same grill with shrimp probibley at the same time or just before they cooked mine. So be carefull that wasp sting may only be 1 of a whole series of things she could have reactions to. You should look up what other animals have like sting chemistry as the post above mentions. Keep that epi-pen even after date, stash them, i keep all my old ones if im in a SHTF senerio or just plan old out of reach (like livabord diving cruise miles away from anywaredeep in the woods camping etc. ) i would rather have old partially degraded shots as my 3-4-5 backups then none at all. You never know.
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