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Posted: 1/4/2012 10:04:30 AM EDT
Lately, I've been thinking about a trauma/medkit set-up. I'm thinking I need a small supply of celox & gauze as well as general bandaging. Other components I've considered include nitrile gloves, alcohol wipes, and pain medication.

I'm curious about a splint set-up as well as a stitch kit. What else would I need for wound care? Is a tourniquet something that should be in there as well?

This is relatively new to me. I'm not looking to perform any major surgeries here. I would just like to have the ability to treat non-life threatening injuries if need be. Y'alls feedback is appreciated!

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:31:06 AM EDT
Some random thoughts:

Tourniquets are almost never needed unless a limb has been severed.

It doesn't hurt to have stuff that exceeds your training (suture kits, quick clot, etc) as it is entirely possible that you will find someone (nurse, EMT, etc) who DOES have the training to use it.

First Aid training, especially CPR, is ALWAYS changing. If you haven't had training in more than a year, it's time to go, both to refresh your memory and to learn the new techniques.

Four boiled & dried cotton bandanas are always lots better than nothing, for large wound protection/direct pressure. That's what I have in my BOB FAK.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 11:09:36 AM EDT
This is a good start.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 6:10:20 PM EDT
This,This,&This. This is my set up. If you go this route, they will also send you a bunch of swag. Part of that will be a bottle of a spice called "Dillo Dust." Don't use it, it's nasty, trust me. Instead, you can send it to me for proper disposal.......
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 6:37:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Some random thoughts:

Tourniquets are almost never needed unless a limb has been severed.

It doesn't hurt to have stuff that exceeds your training (suture kits, quick clot, etc) as it is entirely possible that you will find someone (nurse, EMT, etc) who DOES have the training to use it.

First Aid training, especially CPR, is ALWAYS changing. If you haven't had training in more than a year, it's time to go, both to refresh your memory and to learn the new techniques.

Four boiled & dried cotton bandanas are always lots better than nothing, for large wound protection/direct pressure. That's what I have in my BOB FAK.


I disagree on the use of tourniquets. If trained properly, these have been life (and limb) savers. I do agree that getting as much training and continued training is excellent advice. Most local fire departments/EMT's host free training...take advantage. I just went through Combat Life Saver training again and it's changed from the last time I went through (2 years ago). Technology, science and applied techniques are continually improving.

quote]Originally Posted By FP2000H:
Lately, I've been thinking about a trauma/medkit set-up. I'm thinking I need a small supply of celox & gauze as well as general bandaging. Other components I've considered include nitrile gloves, alcohol wipes, and pain medication.

I'm curious about a splint set-up as well as a stitch kit. What else would I need for wound care? Is a tourniquet something that should be in there as well?

This is relatively new to me. I'm not looking to perform any major surgeries here. I would just like to have the ability to treat non-life threatening injuries if need be. Y'alls feedback is appreciated!

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile[/quote]

Plenty of gauze, large wraps and tape are good basics and the most used. Celox is good addition but if something is bad enough for that type of dressing, I would familiarize myself and get some basic training on tourniquets as well.

Same goes for splints. A simple sheet or SAM splint is good for larger kits. I've received some training on sutures in the past, but have really considered the newer staple kits. Most of my personal med kits use butterfly-type bandages for bad lacerations. One major consideration if you plan to sew or staple a bad laceration is to have something to clean and disinfect the area. I small syringe with a solution of iodine is a good addition and a lot less painful than scrubbing. FrankSymptoms is offering great advice on just having a few cravats or bandanas on hand; several uses and easy to improvise for pressure dressings. Depending on your environment and training, chest seals (or at least knowing how to improvise one) are good ideas. I saw a new bandage wrap that integrated a small plastic cup; it can be used like a leveraged-pressure dressing or inverted to cover an eye wound. Know how to insert a nasopharyngeal airway tube can be a life saver and they are small and light.
Most non-life threatening wounds can be treated with plenty of gauze pads, tape and some topical antibiotic ointment/cream. I do like to keep a small bottle of eye drops to flush out foreign objects in my eyes. A good pair of safety shears is always a good addition. Add your favorite assorted band aids and you’ll be pretty much set. Remember that you can never have too much gauze or tape! Even with smaller lacerations, you will have to change the dressings a few times to keep it clean.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 7:34:55 PM EDT
First off, Kelb, thank you for that link. I feel dumb that I didn't find that sooner. Many of the things on the list I have been considering so it will definitely help me get a clearer picture of what exactly may go in the kit.

Originally Posted By arcticwarrior:
This,This,&This. This is my set up. If you go this route, they will also send you a bunch of swag. Part of that will be a bottle of a spice called "Dillo Dust." Don't use it, it's nasty, trust me. Instead, you can send it to me for proper disposal.......


I looked at LaRue's package. (that's what she said ) I hunted down the Celox applicators and gauze at a lower price from a site where I wouldn't have to pay sales tax with the order. I figure I'd order a few of each and it would be cheaper than LaRue. I've even considered just ordering the trauma package and picking up extras from other sites.


Originally Posted By ROCK6:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Some random thoughts:

Tourniquets are almost never needed unless a limb has been severed.

It doesn't hurt to have stuff that exceeds your training (suture kits, quick clot, etc) as it is entirely possible that you will find someone (nurse, EMT, etc) who DOES have the training to use it.

First Aid training, especially CPR, is ALWAYS changing. If you haven't had training in more than a year, it's time to go, both to refresh your memory and to learn the new techniques.

Four boiled & dried cotton bandanas are always lots better than nothing, for large wound protection/direct pressure. That's what I have in my BOB FAK.


I disagree on the use of tourniquets. If trained properly, these have been life (and limb) savers. I do agree that getting as much training and continued training is excellent advice. Most local fire departments/EMT's host free training...take advantage. I just went through Combat Life Saver training again and it's changed from the last time I went through (2 years ago). Technology, science and applied techniques are continually improving.

Originally Posted By FP2000H:
Lately, I've been thinking about a trauma/medkit set-up. I'm thinking I need a small supply of celox & gauze as well as general bandaging. Other components I've considered include nitrile gloves, alcohol wipes, and pain medication.

I'm curious about a splint set-up as well as a stitch kit. What else would I need for wound care? Is a tourniquet something that should be in there as well?

This is relatively new to me. I'm not looking to perform any major surgeries here. I would just like to have the ability to treat non-life threatening injuries if need be. Y'alls feedback is appreciated!

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Plenty of gauze, large wraps and tape are good basics and the most used. Celox is good addition but if something is bad enough for that type of dressing, I would familiarize myself and get some basic training on tourniquets as well.

Same goes for splints. A simple sheet or SAM splint is good for larger kits. I've received some training on sutures in the past, but have really considered the newer staple kits. Most of my personal med kits use butterfly-type bandages for bad lacerations. One major consideration if you plan to sew or staple a bad laceration is to have something to clean and disinfect the area. I small syringe with a solution of iodine is a good addition and a lot less painful than scrubbing. FrankSymptoms is offering great advice on just having a few cravats or bandanas on hand; several uses and easy to improvise for pressure dressings. Depending on your environment and training, chest seals (or at least knowing how to improvise one) are good ideas. I saw a new bandage wrap that integrated a small plastic cup; it can be used like a leveraged-pressure dressing or inverted to cover an eye wound. Know how to insert a nasopharyngeal airway tube can be a life saver and they are small and light.
Most non-life threatening wounds can be treated with plenty of gauze pads, tape and some topical antibiotic ointment/cream. I do like to keep a small bottle of eye drops to flush out foreign objects in my eyes. A good pair of safety shears is always a good addition. Add your favorite assorted band aids and you’ll be pretty much set. Remember that you can never have too much gauze or tape! Even with smaller lacerations, you will have to change the dressings a few times to keep it clean.

ROCK6


I've been meaning to look into some first aid training. I'll see if I can find some free classes. The whole nasopharyngeal airway tube thing is intimidating considering the circumstances in which it would be employed; however, I understand I need to get as much training as possible if it means I can help someone.

I appreciate the thoughtful responses you guys.
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