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Posted: 11/8/2010 7:11:33 PM EDT
First off, I'm a single guy, cooking for myself mainly, who is buying pans for the first time.  I know a decent amount about cooking, from reading, cooking, watching food network and having 3 friends that went to the CIA.  I've done a decent amount of cooking ... to the extent that I'd feel comfortable making just about anything that involved meat, vegetables, searing and seasoning.

However, I've never used Cast Iron at all in my life ... as a child, it was Revereware copper bottom pan sets, and now it has always been Calphalon teflon coated pans.  I'm looking to get into cooking with cast iron, and figured this would be a good place to ask for advice.

I'm looking at buying these two products, to start me out.  

Lodge Logic 12 Inch Skillet
Emerilware 10 inch Grill Pan

They sell lids for both pans ... but I don't think most people use lids.  I could be wrong.

I think I'm going to try these out before I go for a dutch oven type thing ... I'm also getting a top notch slow cooker, which I have some experience with.

I am mainly just soliciting general advice ... the pans say they come pre-seasoned, and reviewers say to oil and bake them after every use ... seems excessive.  

I know cast iron gets hotter, stays hotter, and cooks more evenly ... my mouth is watering thinking about searing a burger made of ground sirloin and sea salt right now.

So I guess I'm asking ... what are the main benefits of cast iron that I'm overlooking, what are your favorite recipes, and what should I know that I don't already know about cast iron cooking?
Link Posted: 11/8/2010 7:30:46 PM EDT
[#1]
If there is a vote - I vote for Lodge - just because I find it does one heck of a good job at cooking steak / chicken on the stove.  

If you get cast iron you will have to keep it seasoned - no real issue - you just can't let it soak forever in  water - otherwise it will rust.  I wash the pan off, make sure it's hand dried....cook bacon in it to season the pan up from time to time.  If the pan gets any rust, just remove the rust and re-season the pan again.  My mother's Lodge has been going strong for 40+ years.  

Some folks say never wash the pan in soap - me, I am willing to use a bit of dish washing soap to clean it off.  Who wants to cook food in 3 week old grease?

I have about 8 lodge pots and cookers - really only use 3 for 90% of what I need.    The ones with lids I use in the oven - make sure they have the little nipples to help self baste the food.

I use a pressure cooker more than I do my slow cooker.

Brad - In Colorado

Link Posted: 11/8/2010 8:03:12 PM EDT
[#2]
Quoted:
If there is a vote - I vote for Lodge - just because I find it does one heck of a good job at cooking steak / chicken on the stove.  

If you get cast iron you will have to keep it seasoned - no real issue - you just can't let it soak forever in  water - otherwise it will rust.  I wash the pan off, make sure it's hand dried....cook bacon in it to season the pan up from time to time.  If the pan gets any rust, just remove the rust and re-season the pan again.  My mother's Lodge has been going strong for 40+ years.  

Some folks say never wash the pan in soap - me, I am willing to use a bit of dish washing soap to clean it off.  Who wants to cook food in 3 week old grease?

I have about 8 lodge pots and cookers - really only use 3 for 90% of what I need.    The ones with lids I use in the oven - make sure they have the little nipples to help self baste the food.

I use a pressure cooker more than I do my slow cooker.

Brad - In Colorado



I was planning on getting both of those pans, so no vote.  Some people allege that the Emerilware pan is made by Lodge, just tweaked by him a bit ... I don't know anything about this, but reviews favor his pan over the lodge grill pan.

Pressure cooker huh? Let me look into that.
Link Posted: 11/8/2010 8:11:18 PM EDT
[#3]
I love cast iron cooking.  This is the only thing that I had ever cooked with until I got married.  I have various cast iron skillets and kettles that have been given to me by various family members.   I love my wagner skillet but cook a lot with a Lodge skillet mom gave me.  I prefer to cook with cast iron and stainless steel even now.  My wife prefers teflon and copper though.  

Cast is so easy to maintain as the above contributors have already noted.  They will last generations as the small wagner 8in skillet is now on its 3rd generation and hopefully with go multiple more.

I love the flavor and texture that it creates when cooking with them.  My favorite food to cook up in them is fried potatoes and fried chicken.  A deeper skillet is good for pan frying chicken and fish.  If I had to choose only one skillet to cook with I would keep grandmas 12 in skillet.  

My favorite recipe would be to butterfly the backstrap off a young deer.  Flour it and sear it quickly in the cast iron skillet.  I then use the drippings to make scratch pepper gravy and then put the meat back into the skillet.  Slide it in the oven and cook it on 300 or so until the meat is falling apart tender.  I throw potatoes in the oven at the same time.  When done I cut the meat with a fork and a good bake potato with gravy.  For me doesn't get much better than this.
Link Posted: 11/8/2010 8:43:26 PM EDT
[#4]
If you want to do some searching you can usually find well seasoned cast iron at garage sales and possibly goodwill stores.

If you want new Lodge makes pretty good stuff.  I have their 12" skillet, 8"skillet and 5 qt dutch oven.  The lid from the dutch oven fits the 8" skillet and has the "basting dimples" on the bottom.  Lodge also makes a grill pan; not sure where the Emeril stuff comes from, Lodge is made in USA.  Walmart sells both style pans you're looking at.  You should be able to get both skillets for $35 or so.  I'd recommend getting a skillet and dutch oven; it will cover 90% of your cooking needs.  The 5qt dutch oven is about $35 too.  

The grill pans are nice but you're limited in what you can cook in them.  

As far as cooking with cast; it retains heat better and cooks more evenly. Searing works well.   Frying in cast iron works rather well; either deep or pan frying.  Keep an eye on the heat when you first start using them they'll stay hot once they get to temp.  The short handles definately get hot and the pans can got from stove top to oven without any problems.  

Taking care of cast iron isn't too hard and doesn't require too much extra care.  When I'm done cooking I usually just rinse out the skillet with hot water and maybe make a couple passes with one of those scotchbrite scrubbing sponges (the blue or green ones) or a stiff bristle brush; no saop. I don't use any pressure, kind of just wiping them out with the scrubber.  I'm careful not to get down to "bare metal" but I will knock down the stuck on food.   I dry it off with a paper towel and put the cleaned pan on a warm burner to throughly dry it; the same one I was cooking on works fine.  You shouldn't have to reseason after each use; if you do you're doing something wrong.  Bare metal and long exposure to water don't mix with cast iron.  If you're the kind to leave the dirty pots and pans in the sink for an extended time; cast iron may not be for you.

Seasoning has a couple different schools of thought.  All of which involve baking the oil coated pan for a length of time.  The type of oil and length of time varies.  I usually use a thin coat of crisco on the entire pan, and bake for 2 hours at 350; shut the heat off and let it cool down in the oven.

Link Posted: 11/9/2010 7:57:33 AM EDT
[#5]
look around for the cast iron ribeye recipe.
it uses more butter than I care for.
get your pan HOT just enough butter to coat the pan.
sear one side for like a minute flip and sear the other side for a minute.
for a really thick cut you use the alton brown method and finish it in the oven.
it cooks much faster than you think. I did mine one minute per side and after a slight rest came out a even medium.
we use this in the winter or if I dont feel like getting the grill going.
not sure what the griddle does that you cant just do in the pan. unless your after the grill marks

the next step for me is a dutch oven.
Link Posted: 11/9/2010 11:23:58 AM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:
what are the main benefits of cast iron that I'm overlooking,

Don't forget that cast iron excels at cooking outdoors.   Campfire, coals, charcoal, portable stove, cast iron does it all.

Downside:  Hefty weight

what are your favorite recipes

Cooks almost anything on a stove top.  I especially like frying in cast iron.
Roasts ond Sourdough Boule's in the Dutch Oven are my favorites when using in an oven.
Biscuits and cobblers are best when baked in a Dutch Oven and cooked using campfire coals.

what should I know that I don't already know about cast iron cooking?

Go ahead and spring for a lid for those times that you need to cover the pan when cooking or to put out a grease fire.
Link Posted: 11/10/2010 8:45:19 AM EDT
[#7]
Alton Brown Rib Eye

This recipe is great one to use. I have it or a variation of it usually once a week. You can even just do it outside on your grill to cut down on smoke. Just put the pan in on the grill grates and crank the heat for 10 minutes or so to get it nice and hot. Cook steak (doesn;t have to be rib eye, use any cut)

If you need to season your pan good, clean it with some warm water and dry it. Cover the whole thing with crisco and put it in your grill at high heat for 45 minutes. I do this even with the "pre-seasoned" pans.
Link Posted: 11/10/2010 3:49:09 PM EDT
[#8]
Quoted:


I am mainly just soliciting general advice ... the pans say they come pre-seasoned, and reviewers say to oil and bake them after every use ... seems excessive.  

I know cast iron gets hotter, stays hotter, and cooks more evenly ... my mouth is watering thinking about searing a burger made of ground sirloin and sea salt right now.

So I guess I'm asking ... what are the main benefits of cast iron that I'm overlooking, what are your favorite recipes, and what should I know that I don't already know about cast iron cooking?


I season my cast iron (which is what oil and bake is––that seasons the pan) only when I see the coating getting thin, or if I see rust.  A wll-seasoned skillet––and one you cook in frequently––will cook better and stick less than a poorly seasoned one.  I would season any skillet, pre-seasoned or not.

As to care, I do everything wrong.  

I put mine in soapy water to wash it.  I don't necessarily dry it right away.  I let it sit in the dish drainer.  

I season mine by smearing shortening or oil on it and cooking it in a slow oven overnight.  Easy Peasy.

Mine all came from yard sales or junk shops, bought by my mom over the years because she has some innate connection to the cast iron gods and just "knows" when she holds a good-quality piece of cast iron, even if it says nothing on the skillet anywhere.  

Cast iron is da bomb.  If you want to make cornbread, you need cast iron.  That is all.  

It's not nearly as sensitive as some folks would lead you to believe.  And if you screw it up?  Scrub it down and season it again.  Unless you break it, it's really hard to seriously damage cast iron.  You will, however, damage your porcelain sink with cast iron if you are not very careful.  Just sayin.

Link Posted: 11/10/2010 3:59:42 PM EDT
[#9]
I have several cast iron pans, but the one that see the most use is my lodge 10" griddle.  I use it for breakfast & lunch since it is a little thinner and heats up very rapidly (things are a bit rushed in our house especially in the am).
Link Posted: 11/10/2010 4:07:55 PM EDT
[#10]
try this site.very informative
http://www.camp-cook.com/forum/
Link Posted: 12/8/2010 12:32:11 AM EDT
[#11]
Ok, I don't get the methods people are suggesting of cleaning ...

I seasoned my 10 inch grill pan with crisco, rubbed it all over, put it in the oven at 350 for an hour, then reapplied crisco and did it again.

I then turned off the oven, let it sit overnight, and took it out today.  The pan was kind of sticky, and very shiney and black.

I cooked a ribeye on it today.  The ribeye came out great ... it didn't stick to the pan or anything, but the cleaning of the pan, not so much.

I used some hot water on the pan when it was still warm and tried to paper towel route ... I got some stuff off, but my pan was still visibly filthy.  So I did it some more ... and it seems like the more I try to clean the pan, the more brown stuff starts accumulating and coming off.

I really don't get how I'm supposed to get the pan clean without taking off the "seasoning" ... I'm starting to think people that use cast iron a lot simply cook in disgustingly dirty pans, similar to a grill that hasn't been cleaned in years in appearance.

If that's what I'm supposed to do ... I'm not playing that game.  I'll cook in teflon pans and get them squeaky clean over cooking in a filthy cast iron pan that has months of brown crud accumulated in it "because I'm not supposed to scrub or use soap" to clean them.

Please enlighten me as to what I'm doing wrong, because I'm starting to really doubt this whole cast iron thing.
Link Posted: 12/8/2010 5:08:12 AM EDT
[#12]
I am hesitant to reply.
But I would say from your post, you should probably not cook with cast iron.
It will probably not meet your definition of clean without removing the seasoning.
(and perhaps not even if you remove the seasoning, I think that the brown you are seeing is actually iron from the pan).

This website gives a good explanation of cleaning.

or use Alton Browns method.
You tube has lots of videos on seasoning and cleaning, but I think you will not like any of cleaning ones.
Link Posted: 12/8/2010 7:16:00 AM EDT
[#13]



Quoted:


I am hesitant to reply.

But I would say from your post, you should probably not cook with cast iron.

It will probably not meet your definition of clean without removing the seasoning.

(and perhaps not even if you remove the seasoning, I think that the brown you are seeing is actually iron from the pan).



This website gives a good explanation of cleaning.



or use Alton Browns method.

You tube has lots of videos on seasoning and cleaning, but I think you will not like any of cleaning ones.
I use the Alton Brown salt method to clean mine. It works well.



 
Link Posted: 12/8/2010 10:35:27 AM EDT
[#14]
Quoted:
Ok, I don't get the methods people are suggesting of cleaning ...

I seasoned my 10 inch grill pan with Crisco, rubbed it all over, put it in the oven at 350 for an hour, then reapplied Crisco and did it again.

I then turned off the oven, let it sit overnight, and took it out today.  The pan was kind of sticky, and very shiney and black.

I cooked a ribeye on it today.  The ribeye came out great ... it didn't stick to the pan or anything, but the cleaning of the pan, not so much.

I used some hot water on the pan when it was still warm and tried to paper towel route ... I got some stuff off, but my pan was still visibly filthy.  So I did it some more ... and it seems like the more I try to clean the pan, the more brown stuff starts accumulating and coming off.

I really don't get how I'm supposed to get the pan clean without taking off the "seasoning" ... I'm starting to think people that use cast iron a lot simply cook in disgustingly dirty pans, similar to a grill that hasn't been cleaned in years in appearance.

If that's what I'm supposed to do ... I'm not playing that game.  I'll cook in teflon pans and get them squeaky clean over cooking in a filthy cast iron pan that has months of brown crud accumulated in it "because I'm not supposed to scrub or use soap" to clean them.

Please enlighten me as to what I'm doing wrong, because I'm starting to really doubt this whole cast iron thing.


You're not doing anything wrong. If someone tells you they have never had a stuck mess in a cast-iron pan, they either don't cook much or are lying. If I get a stuck mess in mine, I brillo it out, wash and dry it, Smear a little fat in it (or not)and put it away. Although the whole seasoning process is better, sometimes for me there's no time.

The seasoning process just leaves a resinous like residue that helps prevent sticking. Not having that residue for me is no big deal.

I don't blame you about cooking in a dirty pan. I'll take a side grinder to mine before I cook in a dirty pan.

Link Posted: 12/8/2010 11:15:49 AM EDT
[#15]




Quoted:

Ok, I don't get the methods people are suggesting of cleaning ...



I seasoned my 10 inch grill pan with crisco, rubbed it all over, put it in the oven at 350 for an hour, then reapplied crisco and did it again.



I then turned off the oven, let it sit overnight, and took it out today. The pan was kind of sticky, and very shiney and black.



I cooked a ribeye on it today. The ribeye came out great ... it didn't stick to the pan or anything, but the cleaning of the pan, not so much.



I used some hot water on the pan when it was still warm and tried to paper towel route ... I got some stuff off, but my pan was still visibly filthy. So I did it some more ... and it seems like the more I try to clean the pan, the more brown stuff starts accumulating and coming off.



I really don't get how I'm supposed to get the pan clean without taking off the "seasoning" ... I'm starting to think people that use cast iron a lot simply cook in disgustingly dirty pans, similar to a grill that hasn't been cleaned in years in appearance.



If that's what I'm supposed to do ... I'm not playing that game. I'll cook in teflon pans and get them squeaky clean over cooking in a filthy cast iron pan that has months of brown crud accumulated in it "because I'm not supposed to scrub or use soap" to clean them.



Please enlighten me as to what I'm doing wrong, because I'm starting to really doubt this whole cast iron thing.
the word is patina and bacon grease is your friend!!! once you got a layer down its like cooking on teflon. patina is why you dont use soap to wash with either. Hot water to clean throw it back on the stove and dry with a little oil of your choice. I use virgin oil from sams.



Link Posted: 12/16/2010 3:39:39 AM EDT
[#16]
Quoted:
Ok, I don't get the methods people are suggesting of cleaning ...

I seasoned my 10 inch grill pan with crisco, rubbed it all over, put it in the oven at 350 for an hour, then reapplied crisco and did it again.

I then turned off the oven, let it sit overnight, and took it out today.  The pan was kind of sticky, and very shiney and black.

I cooked a ribeye on it today.  The ribeye came out great ... it didn't stick to the pan or anything, but the cleaning of the pan, not so much.

I used some hot water on the pan when it was still warm and tried to paper towel route ... I got some stuff off, but my pan was still visibly filthy.  So I did it some more ... and it seems like the more I try to clean the pan, the more brown stuff starts accumulating and coming off.

I really don't get how I'm supposed to get the pan clean without taking off the "seasoning" ... I'm starting to think people that use cast iron a lot simply cook in disgustingly dirty pans, similar to a grill that hasn't been cleaned in years in appearance.

If that's what I'm supposed to do ... I'm not playing that game.  I'll cook in teflon pans and get them squeaky clean over cooking in a filthy cast iron pan that has months of brown crud accumulated in it "because I'm not supposed to scrub or use soap" to clean them.

Please enlighten me as to what I'm doing wrong, because I'm starting to really doubt this whole cast iron thing.


Sounds like to me that you used too much crisco during the seasoning process.  When seasoning, you're supposed to lightly coat the surface, then wipe off what you can leaving a very thin coat of oil.  

Keep working at it, it will get better, then you'll never go back!

Good luck.

Merlin
Link Posted: 12/16/2010 4:48:14 AM EDT
[#17]
I'm of the "a little soap doesn't hurt" school myself, but rather than get embroiled in that particular battle again, I'll just offer up another use for your cast iron skillet that I haven't seen listed yet.

Nothing I've seen beats a well-seasoned cast iron skillet for baking cornbread in the oven.  The secret is to preheat the skillet... grease/butter it, then stick it in the oven while it is preheating and you are preparing the rest of the ingredients.  Take the heated skillet out of the oven and dump in the mix (whatever your favorite recipe is) and bake as directed.

!WARNING WARNING!

When it comes out of the oven, the handle will be blazingly hot - 400F or whatever you bake the cornbreat at.  If you're like me, you WILL at some point grab that handle and inflict great pain upon yourself.  I now stick an oven mitt over the handle as soon as it goes from oven to trivet/potholder on the counter.
Link Posted: 12/16/2010 6:57:42 PM EDT
[#18]
Quoted:

I used some hot water on the pan when it was still warm and tried to paper towel route ... I got some stuff off, but my pan was still visibly filthy.  So I did it some more ... and it seems like the more I try to clean the pan, the more brown stuff starts accumulating and coming off.


Okay. Scrub it with salt, and a touch of water. Just enough to make a paste. A healthy dash of salt, a little water, and some paper towels should remove just about any stuck on food. Give it a quick once over with a soapy cloth, rinse, and put it up. That's all it takes. The pan is not filthy, it's not going to make you sick.

You can rub that thing all day long, and you're going to continue to get the brown residue, until you break through the seasoning to raw cast iron. That brown residue coming off on your paper towel IS the seasoning. The seasoning is nothing more than carbon scale left over from burning off the fat that you rubbed the metal down with. It's what seals in and protects the cast iron, and makes for a nice, even (mostly) non-stick surface.

You also have very new cast iron. It's going to take a little while of using it, and the occasional re-season before it's well seasoned. I have two pans that my mother grudgingly parted with that belonged to my grand mother. They're balck as coal all over, and the bottom surface inside is every bit as smooth as a coated teflon pan. That's from  50+ years of use. I have a couple newer ones that are starting to be just as perfect after a couple years of regular use.

ETA: Your best bet for building up the season on the inside is to start cooking your bacon and eggs in it regularly, and do some shallow-oil pan frying. It'll get you there just that much quicker. Don't give up on cast iron, because frankly there's some things you can do with it that just can't be duplicated well with other pans.
Link Posted: 12/17/2010 3:07:31 AM EDT
[#19]
I frequently re-season my cast iron whenever baking something else.

Just smear on whatever grease/oil you like and pop it in the oven along with the other food.  Let it stay in there after turning the oven off so that the pores close slowly.

Regarding stuck on food, I'll put some soapy water in the pan and heat it up on the stove top until the gunk comes loose.  Then rinse/dry/reheat/oil.

And the brown stuff that always comes off when you wipe your pans is "character."  I know that this is a selling point on cookware infomercials:  "It tastes like your grandmother's food because her food is still on there."  So what?

I WILL say that the only piece of cast iron cookware that I cannot use successfully is the pots.  Cooking soups & anything that simmers (or has any tomato product in them) such just leaves the food tasting like metal, and the pot always seems to get a layer of rust.  Frying  with oil...not a problem.  Stewing a liquid...can't figure it out.
Link Posted: 12/18/2010 4:56:45 PM EDT
[#20]
I use to hate that I couldn't get my cast iron pans clean even when seasoned correctly.  Then I saw the method using a tablespoon of salt.  

Just got done cooking bacon and eggs.  Lightly scraped the pan with the edge of my metal spatula to get the heavy stuff off.  Wiped with a paper towel to get excess bacon grease out, dumped in a tablespoon of salt, wiped with another paper towel and rinsed and dried with a third paper towel. Lightly oil and it is ready to cook in again.

I've got an old Wagner round griddle, a cast iron pizza pan, a 10 1/2 inch Wagner frying pan, a 10 1/2 inch no name pan I found somewhere, a 5 inch Puritan pan and a Lodge Dutch oven on the way from Ebay.

I had pork chops I cooked the other day and they brown up nicely in the cast iron pan.

No more teflon crap pans for me.  I had one I cooked chili in the other day and used no utensils other than plastic on.  Washed the pan and it appeared that a large number of chips came off the teflon for no reason.

Can't wait to see how the Dutch oven works for chili.  I've got some buffalo and venison just waiting for the Dutch oven to get here.
Link Posted: 12/18/2010 9:41:05 PM EDT
[#21]

I just found my two favorite cast iron pans that went missing... No one seemed to know anything about them being in the garage, and they are now rusty Time to cut a hole in the foundation and route the dryer outside. I was less than thrilled to learn about this today...

Link Posted: 12/18/2010 9:49:48 PM EDT
[#22]
You guys baby your cast iron cookware too much. I just use it as normal, nothing special. IF it rusts, I use a little cooking oil soaked on a paper napkin and wipe it off. After a few months of usage, it will turn jet black and won't rust anymore. Nothing to it. I use my 12" kettle to cook fried chicken etc, to prevent excessive oil splatter good stuff. My wife doesn't like it because the thing is heavy to lift, and perfers the copper-clad bottom pots & pans, but I like to stirr fry, and those thin pans just warp.
Link Posted: 12/18/2010 10:12:10 PM EDT
[#23]





Quoted:



Ok, I don't get the methods people are suggesting of cleaning ...





I seasoned my 10 inch grill pan with crisco, rubbed it all over, put it in the oven at 350 for an hour, then reapplied crisco and did it again.





I then turned off the oven, let it sit overnight, and took it out today.  The pan was kind of sticky, and very shiney and black.





I cooked a ribeye on it today.  The ribeye came out great ... it didn't stick to the pan or anything, but the cleaning of the pan, not so much.





I used some hot water on the pan when it was still warm and tried to paper towel route ... I got some stuff off, but my pan was still visibly filthy.  So I did it some more ... and it seems like the more I try to clean the pan, the more brown stuff starts accumulating and coming off.





I really don't get how I'm supposed to get the pan clean without taking off the "seasoning" ... I'm starting to think people that use cast iron a lot simply cook in disgustingly dirty pans, similar to a grill that hasn't been cleaned in years in appearance.





If that's what I'm supposed to do ... I'm not playing that game.  I'll cook in teflon pans and get them squeaky clean over cooking in a filthy cast iron pan that has months of brown crud accumulated in it "because I'm not supposed to scrub or use soap" to clean them.





Please enlighten me as to what I'm doing wrong, because I'm starting to really doubt this whole cast iron thing.



What I do is as soon as I am done eating, the pan is usually warm and I rinse it with hot water. This gets most of the loose stuff. Then I pour sea salt into the pan (maybe 1/4 cup, depending on pan size), scrub the salt with a paper towel, rinse again with hot water. By this point the pan is clean. I then wipe it dry, get another paper towel, and wipe some olive oil on the pan to keep it slick.





Been doing the above for several years, and my pans are not dirty, nor is the seasoning hurt in anyway.





ETA:



Didn't know that method was recommended by Alton Brown. I think I picked it up from my mother or grandmother.





 
Link Posted: 12/18/2010 11:02:01 PM EDT
[#24]
Gosh, I just wash my cast iron stuff with the normal dishwashing detergent. and put it on the drain board to dry. The only bad thing is, those pans or pot are heavy, and I broke a couple of dishes. So you have to be careful, it is not a stamped metal appliance.
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