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Posted: 6/11/2018 7:46:44 PM EDT
So, I'm looking to upgrade my backpacking insulation layer, and due to the humidity and rain conditions this spring back home, I'm looking into synthetic puff jackets. I acknowledge this is a pretty niche item for most and the higher end Puffs are pretty expensive to save a few ounces...which is a big consideration. Criteria are performance, weight, compression, and price.

The top two I'm looking at are the new Patagonia Micro Puff jacket with their new "PlumaFill" insulation and Enlightened Equipment's Torrid APEX with 2.0 Climashield insulation fill.

From what I can see, Patagonia's insulation provides slightly better performance and better compression, but almost twice the price. The Torrid APEX jacket is slightly lighter (about an ounce for the same size/no hood). I do like the fact that I can get the APEX in Coyote and other custom colors and from what I read, it's cut slightly larger for layering. I know that can be an issue as you want a tighter fit for this type of puff-insulation layer, but I have a slightly larger chest and some of the "slim fitting" jackets don't work so well.

So, anybody have experience with either the Micro Puff or Enlightened Equipment's Torrid APEX puff-insulation layers?

ROCK6
Link Posted: 6/11/2018 8:26:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/11/2018 8:29:07 PM EDT by Alaskagrown]
I know it's not one of the two you listed but my next puffy will be the Kryptek Lykos II. It uses 3m featherless down.

I had a now discontinued kuiu spindrift however the insulation didn't last and and it easily got holes from normal wear. I have actually been much happier with my $30 Costco down puffy.
Link Posted: 6/12/2018 3:35:17 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Alaskagrown:
I know it's not one of the two you listed but my next puffy will be the Kryptek Lykos II. It uses 3m featherless down.

I had a now discontinued kuiu spindrift however the insulation didn't last and and it easily got holes from normal wear. I have actually been much happier with my $30 Costco down puffy.
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Wow, great pricing on that Lykos; what is the weight on that? It didn't list it on the website...just curious, but it's a great deal right now.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 6/12/2018 2:17:25 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By ROCK6:

Wow, great pricing on that Lykos; what is the weight on that? It didn't list it on the website...just curious, but it's a great deal right now.

ROCK6
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I'm not sure on the weight I sent a message to Kryptek to ask, when i hear back i will post it here.

Before Butch Whiting their CEO moved to Idaho he lived in Fairbanks. It was back when Kryptek was only available at Cabelas and Alaska didnt have one to shop at I messaged them to see if there was anywhere in Alaska to check their stuff out. Long story short I wound up in Butch's living room drinking beer and checking out their gear, talking hunting, Kryptek's origins, future stuff and the military trials they were going through. Really cool guy and company.
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 3:20:12 AM EDT
I've heard nothing but good things about the EE Torrid from other UL backpackers.
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 7:46:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2018 7:49:00 AM EDT by ROCK6]
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Originally Posted By MrVegas:
I've heard nothing but good things about the EE Torrid from other UL backpackers.
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Same here, which is why I've been looking into it. It's really for early spring trips and some fall trips where temps fluctuate more and there's more precipitation. I would normally consider down (even treated dri-down), but last year we got pretty soaked during the day and the temps dropped with more rain at night and nothing dried out. DWR coatings help, but if I'm outside my hammock longer than needed to take a leak, I was getting pretty wet. I could make down work, but the EE Torrid is cheaper and would provide better insurance if the next trip gets as wet during those time periods. I do have a rain jacket (OR Helium II), but I'm trying out the Packa pack-cover/rain jacket...it's not something I want to throw on for work around camp, but I will if needed.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 7:58:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2018 7:59:02 AM EDT by NotIssued]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ROCK6:

Wow, great pricing on that Lykos; what is the weight on that? It didn't list it on the website...just curious, but it's a great deal right now.

ROCK6
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I have one in EE currently if size fits. Save a few bucks
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 11:20:55 AM EDT
Since i didnt answer your quesrion previously. I would go with the EE Torrid as well. I like that EE allows you to customize what you want and like supporting the cottage mfgrs when possible..
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 11:32:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/17/2018 11:38:46 AM EDT by telemarker]
Im not familiar with the other brand but I personally own both of these

Patagonia
Outdoor Research

Of the two I wear the Outdoor Research one the most. I go with the Patagonia one for a little more insulation. Both are designed as a layering piece to go under a hard shell which I have used both for with great results. If you get on the companys mailing list you will receive codes for as much as 50% off. That's how I got the Patagonia jacket.
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 2:51:20 PM EDT
Have you considered a synthetic vest ( or vests in general ) ?
I think my next backpacking puffy layer will be synthetic and sleeveless.

for me my hoodless Mountain Hardware Nitrous puff has become 1 of my most carried, least used
pieces of gear. It's great, for me (again), in that little window after I've cooled down and settled into camp
and before I'm in the sack. It's also nice in the AM when I'm 1st up and still stumbling around but not actually doing anything. It would have to be very cold for me to hike in it.

Any other time it seems too warm, too delicate, too constricting, too sensitive to moisture, not breathable
enough, ...

For me (again again) a hooded microgrid fleece is my always carried, most used piece of gear. It goes as soon as I'm cleaned up at camp, I'll sleep in it if I'm cheating quilt/pad ratings or put it on when I first get up. It works for AM chores and if I'm still cold I can hike out wearing it. Pull it off when things warm up.

It's durable, stretchable, comfortable, unaffected by moisture and breathable.

I size my rain jacket so it will functionally fit over my fleece and I keep thinking adding a synthetic vest to the mix would make sense. Under the fleece for maximum warmth, add the rain jacket for a shell, vest and jacket
for other temps, just the vest if you're shooting a music video...
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 5:07:16 PM EDT
As far as fleece is concerned, I'll be picking up a Melly in Leadville when I get there on my CT thru in a few weeks. Might be sending my REI Revelcloud Hoodie home but I'll make that call when I get there.
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 5:33:32 PM EDT
IDK if it will fit your bill, but if I was looking for something lightweight and packable I'd get this action!



52 bucks. https://perseverancesurvival.com/bags
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 5:54:42 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MrVegas:
As far as fleece is concerned, I'll be picking up a Melly in Leadville when I get there on my CT thru in a few weeks. Might be sending my REI Revelcloud Hoodie home but I'll make that call when I get there.
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When you get there just say " Lint sent me , ' ( hella melly ) ' whisper breath "

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 9:06:31 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By no_1:

When you get there just say " Lint sent me , ' ( hella melly ) ' whisper breath "

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/310425/hella_melli-578968.JPG
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Say all of that? I'll do it.
Link Posted: 6/17/2018 9:42:41 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By no_1:
Have you considered a synthetic vest ( or vests in general ) ?
I think my next backpacking puffy layer will be synthetic and sleeveless.

for me my hoodless Mountain Hardware Nitrous puff has become 1 of my most carried, least used
pieces of gear. It's great, for me (again), in that little window after I've cooled down and settled into camp
and before I'm in the sack. It's also nice in the AM when I'm 1st up and still stumbling around but not actually doing anything. It would have to be very cold for me to hike in it.

Any other time it seems too warm, too delicate, too constricting, too sensitive to moisture, not breathable
enough, ...

For me (again again) a hooded microgrid fleece is my always carried, most used piece of gear. It goes as soon as I'm cleaned up at camp, I'll sleep in it if I'm cheating quilt/pad ratings or put it on when I first get up. It works for AM chores and if I'm still cold I can hike out wearing it. Pull it off when things warm up.

It's durable, stretchable, comfortable, unaffected by moisture and breathable.

I size my rain jacket so it will functionally fit over my fleece and I keep thinking adding a synthetic vest to the mix would make sense. Under the fleece for maximum warmth, add the rain jacket for a shell, vest and jacket
for other temps, just the vest if you're shooting a music video...
View Quote
Good suggestions all. One of my conundrums is to keep weight down for such a layer as it's not worn when on the trail, or if it is, it's just slipped on during a break when you cool down. This is one of my challenges as I would like to keep it at or under 8oz. A vest is a great suggestion. I have the Arc'Teryx Cerium SL Vest, which I pack during the summer months just in case temps dip down to where it's uncomfortable in just a T-shirt...it weighs 4.2oz and works quite well for what it is. It is down, so I have to watch it with the higher humidity, avoid perspiration build up, or keep it covered up if raining.

One reason I'm preferring sleeves for the two seasonal changes in weather is to augment my sleeping attire. I would also like to be able to wear it to up my quilt rating if temps drop uncomfortably low as well. Now for colder temps where you wear your insulation layers when moving, I love Melanzana grid fleece, and it's more durable to wear under a pack. Lots of good suggestions, thanks. I'm think I'm going to spring for the EE Torrid and give it a shot while home over Christmas and later in the spring when I return for a backpacking trip with the wife...

ROCK6
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