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Posted: 10/27/2013 9:14:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 9:15:08 AM EST by ROCK6]
My son and I squeezed in a quick trip this weekend…especially tough considering all the other crap going and other commitments! He’s only 14, but is pretty darn comfortable in the outdoors…

We decided to do a little “stealth” camping and I wanted to try out the new OR Bug Bivi (not that the bugs were very bad at all). Temperatures were in the upper 30’s at night; no precipitation in the forecast…simply beautiful conditions.

This is a close state park and only a few designated camping areas we had to stay “near” one, but planned to set up our camp just outside of sight of the camp area and trail. There were some large rocks we were able to use for cover and we didn’t make a fire; we just used alcohol stoves. This was a little training for my son to work on “leave no trace” and work on his noise and light discipline. There were no hikers this far out and there was an adequate water source about 100 yards down the hill from our bivouac area.

My son fell in love with my Mystery Ranch 3DAP, so I picked one up for him last year when I returned from Afghanistan; they’re perfect for these types of short trips especially when you’re scouting off-trail and beating some brush. He is also “borrowing” my tan HPG Kit Bag…like father, like son!

I’ll have to add another picture of the gear; nothing spectacular but just about perfect for the 3DAP and a two-three day trip:























We didn’t get out until about an hour before sunset yesterday. It was more of working on our camp set up than anything else. Some work on filtering water and doing some different tarp setups. It was a short but good trip…

ROCK6
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 9:25:54 AM EST
Looks like you guys had a good time and got some training in too! I'll have to plan something similar!

TriumphRider
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 9:57:30 AM EST



May I ask where you got the multicam tarp from; it's size & it's cost?

Nice looking area by the way!
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 10:51:31 AM EST
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Originally Posted By FreeBear:

May I ask where you got the multicam tarp from; it's size & it's cost?

Nice looking area by the way!
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No problem. Swack Shack by Survival Solutions; well under a $100 and a great deal. BCUSA or Bushcraft Outfitters also has some great multicam tarps. The heavier versions are fire retardant, but there are some sil-nylon versions.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 10:51:59 AM EST
ETA Kit Contents:



Pack is a Mystery Ranch 3DAP with an Osprey water bladder.

Shelter:
Multicam Swack Shack
Some solo-tent footprint
OR Bug Bivy
Exped UL7 sleeping pad
Sea to Summit Micro McIII (28-degree rated) 850+fill down bag
Cord/guy-lines

Water Kit:
Sawyer squeeze filter (two squeeze bags)
Nalgene 1-liter water canteen
Pattern 58 NATO canteen with plastic cup and Crusader canteen cup w/ lid

Stove:
Trangia alcohol stove with 8oz fuel bottle (enough for 2-3 days)
Snow Peak spork

Packed clothing:
Issued multicam Soft Shell parka
Cabelas fleece pullover
Ibex light-weight wool hoodie
Minus-33 light-weight wool long underwear
REI wool socks
Fleece watch cap
Silk bandana
Recon Wrap/neck gaiter

Small foodbag, enough for 2-3 days (Mt. House, oat meal, hot-chocolate, coffee, trail mix, ProBarsx2, beef jerky…)

Shortened Cold Steel Frontier hawk
Fiskars trowel
Bahco Laplander folding saw
Streamlight headlamp
FAK

I was wearing some Marmot soft shell pants, wool T-Shirt, Craghoppers synthetic long-sleeve shirt, wool socks and some Merrell hiking boots; synthetic ball cap, Mechanix gloves and Liger belt.

On my person was my custom Martin Knives BT belt knife/system, Emerson CQC10, Bic lighter and chap-stick.

We both wore HPG Kit Bags, one of the better CCW systems for backpacking. I was packing my dedicated Glock 23 and few other items:







ROCK6
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 11:15:57 AM EST
Nice.
Third pic down, looks like Sasquatch sitting on the de-barked log!
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 11:48:18 AM EST
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Originally Posted By hdhogman:
Nice.
Third pic down, looks like Sasquatch sitting on the de-barked log!
View Quote


Hahaha, yea just looked at it and it does. There was a lot of coyote activity and what I assumed was an armadillo as they sound like a tank bowling through the leaves but I still slept great...Sasquatch and all

ROCK6
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:54:05 PM EST
Cool, speaking of which, you men should try some extreme cold winter camping.
Just bring the minimum needed.
Did a lot of that as a mid-teen in the Allegheney Natl. Forest in PA.
Would get dropped off over Christmas break, picked up right before New Years, Loved It!
Was raised as a little Daniel Boone.
Keep at it!
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 3:33:23 PM EST
Very cool Rock! Thanks for sharing. It's good that you could spend quality time with your son and have it be good training too. A twofer!
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:38:43 PM EST
good work.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:50:22 PM EST
Good work. I can't wait until my son is old enough to do these kinds of trips.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 12:17:46 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Variable556:
Very cool Rock! Thanks for sharing. It's good that you could spend quality time with your son and have it be good training too. A twofer!
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The ironic thing is my wife had plans that afternoon but was quite bummed out she didn't get to go...she stayed up most of that night watching documentaries on the Appalachian Trail. She understands the "need for guy-time" but very much wanted to be out there; I won't be able to leave her home next time

ROCK6
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:59:01 AM EST
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Originally Posted By ROCK6:


The ironic thing is my wife had plans that afternoon but was quite bummed out she didn't get to go...she stayed up most of that night watching documentaries on the Appalachian Trail. She understands the "need for guy-time" but very much wanted to be out there; I won't be able to leave her home next time

ROCK6
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Originally Posted By ROCK6:
Originally Posted By Variable556:
Very cool Rock! Thanks for sharing. It's good that you could spend quality time with your son and have it be good training too. A twofer!


The ironic thing is my wife had plans that afternoon but was quite bummed out she didn't get to go...she stayed up most of that night watching documentaries on the Appalachian Trail. She understands the "need for guy-time" but very much wanted to be out there; I won't be able to leave her home next time

ROCK6


my wife's the same way. It's a good problem to have!
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 5:07:11 AM EST
Great post. A question about that HPG kit bag. Do you also use that in warm weather? Also, do you attach the Glock trigger cover to the bag so that if you draw it pulls the trigger cover off?
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 5:16:06 AM EST
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Originally Posted By LawyerUp:
Great post. A question about that HPG kit bag. Do you also use that in warm weather? Also, do you attach the Glock trigger cover to the bag so that if you draw it pulls the trigger cover off?
View Quote


Yeah, I've hiked summer heat/humidity on the AT. It does trap heat, but not as bad as some options; I've found it tolerable when wanting to CCW on the trail. The Kit Bags have a tab in the carrying compartment where you attach the trigger guard. As you draw the pistol, it remains as you pull it off. I actually didn't add it for safety as I'm quite convinced the HPG system doesn't need a trigger guard. I actaully bought it for retention when kayaking and fly fishing, I've only had it fall out once when I accidently left the compartment unzipped and bent over...something to keep in mind.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 5:23:32 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ROCK6:


Yeah, I've hiked summer heat/humidity on the AT. It does trap heat, but not as bad as some options; I've found it tolerable when wanting to CCW on the trail. The Kit Bags have a tab in the carrying compartment where you attach the trigger guard. As you draw the pistol, it remains as you pull it off. I actually didn't add it for safety as I'm quite convinced the HPG system doesn't need a trigger guard. I actaully bought it for retention when kayaking and fly fishing, I've only had it fall out once when I accidently left the compartment unzipped and bent over...something to keep in mind.

ROCK6
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Originally Posted By ROCK6:
Originally Posted By LawyerUp:
Great post. A question about that HPG kit bag. Do you also use that in warm weather? Also, do you attach the Glock trigger cover to the bag so that if you draw it pulls the trigger cover off?


Yeah, I've hiked summer heat/humidity on the AT. It does trap heat, but not as bad as some options; I've found it tolerable when wanting to CCW on the trail. The Kit Bags have a tab in the carrying compartment where you attach the trigger guard. As you draw the pistol, it remains as you pull it off. I actually didn't add it for safety as I'm quite convinced the HPG system doesn't need a trigger guard. I actaully bought it for retention when kayaking and fly fishing, I've only had it fall out once when I accidently left the compartment unzipped and bent over...something to keep in mind.

ROCK6


For carrying a full size Glock, would you prefer an OWB holster if open carry is not a problem?
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 6:03:50 AM EST
Awesome post and pictures! Thanks!

Working on being able to do this kind of thing and seeing your process and gear in action helps a lot!
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 6:32:37 AM EST
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Originally Posted By LawyerUp:

For carrying a full size Glock, would you prefer an OWB holster if open carry is not a problem?
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Absolutely, although the Kit Bag is still a very good carry option and almost as fast as a well designed OWB holster. I usesd Blade-Tech's holsters in Afghanistan and consider them about perfect for me; they wear low off the belt (not a drop leg) and I can still wear a pack's hip belt for heavier loads without interferring with handgun access.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 7:47:49 AM EST
The Bushcraft outfitters tarps are the tops! Have three different ones and love them all.

Big fan of the stealth approach especially for a trip to teach a younger dude how to leave no trace. only thing I might make a tiny comment on is if you're kind of trying to stay unseen, hanging a yellow stash bag on your tarp lines is kind of like having a big "here I am" flag. Not a big serious trip to stay under the radar, but it popped out at me lol
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 8:03:54 AM EST
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Originally Posted By ROCK6:


Absolutely, although the Kit Bag is still a very good carry option and almost as fast as a well designed OWB holster. I usesd Blade-Tech's holsters in Afghanistan and consider them about perfect for me; they wear low off the belt (not a drop leg) and I can still wear a pack's hip belt for heavier loads without interferring with handgun access.

ROCK6
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Originally Posted By ROCK6:
Originally Posted By LawyerUp:

For carrying a full size Glock, would you prefer an OWB holster if open carry is not a problem?


Absolutely, although the Kit Bag is still a very good carry option and almost as fast as a well designed OWB holster. I usesd Blade-Tech's holsters in Afghanistan and consider them about perfect for me; they wear low off the belt (not a drop leg) and I can still wear a pack's hip belt for heavier loads without interferring with handgun access.

ROCK6


I've been looking for OWB holsters for just this purpose and haven't really found what I liked. I might give blade tech a try. Do you know what model specifically you like the best?
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 2:50:37 PM EST
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Originally Posted By sefus:
only thing I might make a tiny comment on is if you're kind of trying to stay unseen, hanging a yellow stash bag on your tarp lines is kind of like having a big "here I am" flag. Not a big serious trip to stay under the radar, but it popped out at me lol
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Originally Posted By sefus:
only thing I might make a tiny comment on is if you're kind of trying to stay unseen, hanging a yellow stash bag on your tarp lines is kind of like having a big "here I am" flag. Not a big serious trip to stay under the radar, but it popped out at me lol


Ha! Yeah, I figured somebody would notice. It was only pseudo stealth and a work in progress. I also noticed about 0300 when mother-nature called and I was surveying the area with my flashlight. Much of the cordage was reflective and for a real stealth situation that will have to go. It’s great for recreational backpacking, but would highlight you in any cursory search. Good eye and I was wondering after looking at the pictures if anybody would catch it…thanks for the reminder.

Originally Posted By LawyerUp:

I've been looking for OWB holsters for just this purpose and haven't really found what I liked. I might give blade tech a try. Do you know what model specifically you like the best?


I’ve used the WRS models from Blade-Tech. They do have the thumb-retention and I used the stand-off attachment that dropped it just below my belt.

ROCK6
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:13:42 PM EST
If you really like having a trowel in your gear, consider replacing it with a Hori-Hori knife. It will be heavier than a plastic trowel BUT it is as multipurpose as a dirt knife/trowel gets and it will never melt if you use it to move coals. I started using them back in the late 80's when an old Bonsai Master taught me about them. I rarely go a day in my life that I don't see one or use one if I am working outside on the property or camping.
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 5:07:49 AM EST
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Originally Posted By DrCyCoe:
If you really like having a trowel in your gear, consider replacing it with a Hori-Hori knife. It will be heavier than a plastic trowel BUT it is as multipurpose as a dirt knife/trowel gets and it will never melt if you use it to move coals. I started using them back in the late 80's when an old Bonsai Master taught me about them. I rarely go a day in my life that I don't see one or use one if I am working outside on the property or camping.
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I really like that Hori-Hori knife. If I wasn't trimming weight, it would be a great addition...it's the perfect tool for foraging and digging tubers. I also do like the idea of a metal trowel (I have the U-Dig-It and a titianium trowel for my light weight needs) when cooking with an open fire and moving coals around. Good suggestion!

ROCK6
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 5:48:28 PM EST
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Originally Posted By pumbaajk:
Good work. I can't wait until my son is old enough to do these kinds of trips.
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x2 here

Freakin awesome dad.
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 9:24:08 PM EST
I didn't see weight mention. How much did your pack weigh?
How much does the bug bivy weigh, and how well does it pack?
How do you like the frontier hawk?
Link Posted: 10/30/2013 12:35:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/30/2013 12:38:20 AM EST by ROCK6]
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Originally Posted By Tim_the_enchanter:
I didn't see weight mention. How much did your pack weigh?
How much does the bug bivy weigh, and how well does it pack?
How do you like the frontier hawk?
View Quote


Pack weights were both at 25 pounds including water. The Bug Bivy weighs right at a pound and it's pretty small for what it is. It's not really a necessity for colder weather and is listed as a two-season shelter. You need a tarp with it, but it will keep insects off you quite well. I would recommend a tarp large enough to cover the bivy and leave you a little work room as the bivy isn't something you're going to do much in except sleep.

The Frontier Hawk wasn't used much as we didn't make any fires and our sites didn't need much clearing. I did chop the handle down a little and my son showed me up when we practiced a little throwing. It's a decent tool for the weight and if used within it's limitations; it's no axe but does well at light chopping chores, limbing, and fire prep.

ROCK6
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