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10/30/2020 2:42:12 PM
Posted: 11/11/2014 2:13:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/11/2014 10:50:01 PM EDT by verticalgain]
Edit****  This thread is now for ALL statewide 2m or 70cm repeater networks.  These networks allow long distance communication for those new hams like me who haven't purchased an HF radio.  

If your state hasn't been posted yet, or if you have something to add, feel free to do so.  I started the thread off with Florida SARNET below.

****
My buddy at work found the SARNET website and we have been making contacts with people all over the state using just the Baofeng HT with Nagoya antenna.

If you live in the state of Florida, and are a new Ham or someone with a tech license, this will be of great interest to you.

The info between the lines is cut/pasted from the SARNET homepage.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FLORIDA SARNET

How SARnet Works...

A SARnet local UHF repeater in your area is connected to other SARnet sites using a microwave radio network operated by the Florida Department of Transportation. The key to why SARnet works so well is that instead of using the internet, it uses dedicated bandwidth on a private microwave network.

The Microwave Network Connection


The FDOT operates a statewide microwave network consisting of point to point microwave radio links that are daisy chained together all over the state. A small portion of the bandwidth on the microwave network is used by SARnet. Even though one UHF SARnet repeater is talking across the network to many statewide UHF repeaters the network only uses a small amount of bandwidth. This is accomplished using an IP technology called muilticast.

Multicast sends only one copy of the incoming repeater radio traffic onto the network and it is shared by all of the SARnet repeaters that are associated with the multicast IP address. SARnet repeaters take turns talking into the multicast network so there is always only one transmission at a time on the network. Even if multiple hams key up multiple radios on multiple repeaters, only one of them will be sent on the network at a time.

FAQ

When I key up my radio am I talking all over the state?

   Yes. If you are talking into a repeater connected to SARnet then when you key your radio, your local repeater responds, along with all the other SARnet repeaters around the state, simulataneously.

When I key up my radio how long should I wait to talk?

   Only a brief momentary pause of no more than one second is needed. It is much more important to WAIT about 2-3 seconds after someone else unkeys before keyking up your radio. This will allow the end of the transmission to propagate through the network and for all of the repeater squelch tails to drop out. Otherwise, some sites with repeaters with long squelch tails will never drop in time to hear short replys from other sites on the system.

This is believed to be a current issue at Orange City, however that repeater is mounted at the top of the tower so it may be some time before the repeater squelch tail is possibly shortened.

How many sites will SARnet include?


   The current plan is to build out between 20 and 22 sites. That size network will be optimum for the ongoing testing that the FDOT wants to do.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Below is a map of the SARNET network.  The Green towers are active now, and if you can link up with one you will be heard by all of the other green towers.  

The Red towers are functional repeaters for the most part, but haven't been hooked up to the network yet.  The map on the website is updated as new sites go online.  






There is a great deal more info on the page linked above the quote.  It would be nice to set up a Florida ArfNet using this, as all one needs is a Baofeng with a good antenna to get started.

I know that as a beginner it has been very encouraging to make so many contacts across the state with it, and I figured I'd post it here for other new or experienced Hams in Florida who may also be interested.
Link Posted: 11/11/2014 3:59:27 AM EDT
Looks interesting that they used UHF to do that. The South looks dark but maybe in the future it will have coverage.
Link Posted: 11/11/2014 4:26:36 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SandHillsHillbilly:
Looks interesting that they used UHF to do that. The South looks dark but maybe in the future it will have coverage.
View Quote


Yeah the red ones down south will hopefully come online soon.   I can reach Jax and Ocala from my house but the Marineland tower that is being built should improve my signal.
Link Posted: 11/11/2014 8:07:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/12/2014 12:22:04 AM EDT by SCWolverine]
SC has a similar system that coincides with the SCETV folks...nice deal!
SCHeart



of course I've never used it....OP thanks for the reminder!
Link Posted: 11/11/2014 4:59:00 PM EDT
We have a similar network in Michigan. We use both "traditional" frequencies, and DMR.

http://w8cmn.net/

Mike
Link Posted: 11/11/2014 7:50:06 PM EDT
Southwest Lynx in Texas used to be similar to that. Bunch of 2m repeater linked through full time 70 cm link repeaters and control lines. Most of the Southwest Lynx has since been dismantled and moved over to become part of the Saltgrass System.
Link Posted: 11/11/2014 8:46:52 PM EDT
Missouri river valley has the Central Region Intertie System
It uses a mix of VHF, UHF, & microwave, all over IRLP. Coverage is from NW corner of Arkansas up through western Missouri and eastern Kansas and into Eastern Nebraska and western Iowa.

And your right. Its cool to be able to work a station 360+ miles on a HT.
Link Posted: 11/11/2014 10:40:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/11/2014 10:53:21 PM EDT by verticalgain]
It is cool that so many states have similar networks.  Ours is pretty active, it's nice.  

I know similar things can be done via the internet repeaters, but for some reason I have zero interest in internet assisted radio at this point.    If at some point my traffic has to go through the internet I may as well have sent an email.  My interest in Ham is that it is a form of communication not dependent on the internet or satellites or landlines.

The FDOT seems pretty serious about keeping these towers powered up at all times, and specifically mention they are designed to be powered during the hurricanes.  They use the network for their own purposes as well, so they won't just be keeping it powered up out of kindness.  

At any rate, thanks for adding the links for other states, this will make the thread more useful for everyone.

**Edited the OP, if your state has a repeater network for 2m or 70cm please post it up.
Link Posted: 11/12/2014 12:38:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/12/2014 3:14:40 PM EDT by PowerPointRanger]
Colorado:

The Colorado Connection system of RF linked repeaters:





From their website: "The Colorado Connection, a unique statewide two meter linked FM radio system with additional coverage into adjacent states. Currently the repeater system provides coverage to about 80-90% of the state's population and about 50-60% of the area. Volunteers have set the goal of providing coverage to virtually all of our state's population and 90-100% of Colorado's area. The Colorado Connection is not a club with dues and membership. It's an invaluable tool of the amateur radio community, provided solely through the financial support of the system users."

Regular Net Times:
-Colorado Traffic Net, Daily at 7:30pm
-Colorado Statewide ARES Net, Sundays at 8:00pm
-Colorado Connection System Net, Thursdays at 8:00pm

Special usage considerations (related to system linking issues):
-Always wait for the repeater you are using to drop and wait a few moments before transmitting again
-When transmitting via normal FM, key your transmitter and wait two seconds before speaking
-When transmitting via IRLP, key your transmitter and wait four seconds before speaking
-Do not use the practice of keying up and saying "This Is" and unkeying before transmitting again with your callsign





Also in the state:

Cheyenne Mountain Repeater Group System: Covers most of Southern Colorado. RepeaterBook Map

The Fun Machine System: Microwave linked Southern Colorado system. Note 70cm dominance. Also carries RMHam digital backbone. Repeaterbook Map

Grand Mesa Repeater Association: ARES/RACES/Skywarn infrastructure on the Western Slope. RepeaterBook Map

Roaring Fork Amateur Repeater Cooperative: Another Western Slope system. RepeaterBook Map



Note the use of 70cm throughout these systems. In the northern part of the front range, primary ARES operations takes place on a 70cm machine and over half of the comm plan frequencies are 70cm. I cannot recommend a good dual-band mobile radio enough: this state is full of RF challenges.
Link Posted: 11/12/2014 11:11:08 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PowerPointRanger:
The Colorado Connection system of RF linked repeaters:


http://www.colcon.org/fig/colcon_coverage.gif

http://www.colcon.org/fig/colorado_connection_map.gif

From their website: "The Colorado Connection, a unique statewide two meter linked FM radio system with additional coverage into adjacent states. Currently the repeater system provides coverage to about 80-90% of the state's population and about 50-60% of the area. Volunteers have set the goal of providing coverage to virtually all of our state's population and 90-100% of Colorado's area. The Colorado Connection is not a club with dues and membership. It's an invaluable tool of the amateur radio community, provided solely through the financial support of the system users."

In Colorado, that's the big one with an ARES and NTS presence.



Also in the state:

Cheyenne Mountain Repeater Group System: Covers most of Southern Colorado. RepeaterBook Map

The Fun Machine System: Microwave linked Southern Colorado system. Note 70cm dominance. Also carries RMHam digital backbone. Repeaterbook Map

Grand Mesa Repeater Association: ARES/RACES/Skywarn infrastructure on the Western Slope. RepeaterBook Map

Roaring Fork Amateur Repeater Cooperative: Another Western Slope system. RepeaterBook Map



Note the use of 70cm throughout these systems. In the northern part of the front range, primary ARES operations takes place on a 70cm machine and over half of the comm plan frequencies are 70cm. I cannot recommend a good dual-band mobile radio enough: this state is full of RF challenges.
View Quote


Never had any good luck contacting people on the CC system. I always have good luck on the Chyenne Mountain system. If you're in Pueblo, you can actually make either the repeater in Salidia or the one in the Springs.
Link Posted: 11/12/2014 11:22:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/12/2014 11:25:54 AM EDT by WING25C]
Wisconsin has something similar as well I am not too spun up on it but coverage is pretty well in areas I go.

Wisconsin Interstate Network

Repeaters

Network Map
Link Posted: 11/12/2014 11:34:50 AM EDT
Another WI network.

http://wecomm.org/
Link Posted: 11/12/2014 12:16:48 PM EDT

PA/NJ/DE/MD



University of Pennsylvania linked repeater system.







A few others listed for PA.





AllStarLink (Somewhat similar to Echolink or IRLP. I have heard hams from the UK on AllStarLink.)
Link Posted: 11/12/2014 2:52:12 PM EDT
The WINS (Western Intertie Network) has repeaters up and down CA and scattered elsewhere in the southwest and PNW.  
Coverage map
Repeater list.
Link Posted: 11/12/2014 3:37:42 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BroncoGlenn:
The WINS (Western Intertie Network) has repeaters up and down CA and scattered elsewhere in the southwest and PNW.  
Coverage map
Repeater list.
View Quote


And I bet their coverage is more complete and uses fewer repeaters compared to the system CHP is running.
Link Posted: 11/12/2014 3:40:20 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By WING25C:
Wisconsin has something similar as well I am not too spun up on it but coverage is pretty well in areas I go.

Wisconsin Interstate Network

Repeaters

Network Map
View Quote


This is a pretty neat system on UHF.  Great coverage.  Pretty dead system though from the times I've listened.
Link Posted: 11/13/2014 2:26:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/13/2014 2:26:46 PM EDT by Beefington]
Interior Alaska is pretty well covered by the Link-Alaska Repeater Project.  At least the highway system is, anyway.


  • Open to ALL properly licensed amateur radio operators

  • Coverage east-west, from Canadian border to Tanana. About 400 miles

  • Coverage north-south, from Yukon River to Anchorage. About 300 miles.



I haven't been very active in ham radio since I moved here so I can't speak to the real world performance of the network.
Link Posted: 11/13/2014 6:14:35 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Beefington:
Interior Alaska is pretty well covered by the Link-Alaska Repeater Project.  At least the highway system is, anyway.


  • Open to ALL properly licensed amateur radio operators

  • Coverage east-west, from Canadian border to Tanana. About 400 miles

  • Coverage north-south, from Yukon River to Anchorage. About 300 miles.

<a href="http://kl7kc.com/repeaters/AARCrptmap.html" target="_blank">http://i.imgur.com/IDPTZHe.gif</a>

I haven't been very active in ham radio since I moved here so I can't speak to the real world performance of the network.
View Quote


A lot of it is linked through All-Star if I remember correctly. I have a friend who pushes his repeater to the Alaska morning net every Friday.
Link Posted: 11/13/2014 7:07:41 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By freema22:
We have a similar network in Michigan. We use both "traditional" frequencies, and DMR.

http://w8cmn.net/

Mike
View Quote


That CMN system is pretty good.  There is another system on the West side of the Lower Peninsula, called the IRA.  w8ira
Link Posted: 11/14/2014 12:40:37 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By zapzap:


A lot of it is linked through All-Star if I remember correctly. I have a friend who pushes his repeater to the Alaska morning net every Friday.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By zapzap:
Originally Posted By Beefington:
Interior Alaska is pretty well covered by the Link-Alaska Repeater Project.  At least the highway system is, anyway.


  • Open to ALL properly licensed amateur radio operators

  • Coverage east-west, from Canadian border to Tanana. About 400 miles

  • Coverage north-south, from Yukon River to Anchorage. About 300 miles.

<a href="http://kl7kc.com/repeaters/AARCrptmap.html" target="_blank">http://i.imgur.com/IDPTZHe.gif</a>

I haven't been very active in ham radio since I moved here so I can't speak to the real world performance of the network.


A lot of it is linked through All-Star if I remember correctly. I have a friend who pushes his repeater to the Alaska morning net every Friday.


I haven't heard of All-Star before.  Some googling doesn't reveal much.  Is it just IRLP?  If not, what makes it different?
Link Posted: 11/14/2014 2:36:07 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Beefington:


I haven't heard of All-Star before.  Some googling doesn't reveal much.  Is it just IRLP?  If not, what makes it different?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Beefington:
Originally Posted By zapzap:
Originally Posted By Beefington:
Interior Alaska is pretty well covered by the Link-Alaska Repeater Project.  At least the highway system is, anyway.


  • Open to ALL properly licensed amateur radio operators

  • Coverage east-west, from Canadian border to Tanana. About 400 miles

  • Coverage north-south, from Yukon River to Anchorage. About 300 miles.

<a href="http://kl7kc.com/repeaters/AARCrptmap.html" target="_blank">http://i.imgur.com/IDPTZHe.gif</a>

I haven't been very active in ham radio since I moved here so I can't speak to the real world performance of the network.


A lot of it is linked through All-Star if I remember correctly. I have a friend who pushes his repeater to the Alaska morning net every Friday.


I haven't heard of All-Star before.  Some googling doesn't reveal much.  Is it just IRLP?  If not, what makes it different?


I've heard some people state that All-Star allows for 16 bit audio where IRLP only allows for 8 bit audio but can't find anything to back it up.

All-Star is based off of Asterisk PBX which is a linux PBX server and a little program called the app_rpt module. IRLP on the other hand is based off of some closed source programs (which feature the DTMF, repeater ID, and repeater controller) and then the open source Speak Freely VOIP software.

All-Star is free, allowing the user to purchase or build a radio interface (common way to build one is to simply use a computer's existing sound card and serial port to pass audio and control PTT and COR). IRLP you have to purchase the IRLP radio interface (which also is how you obtain a node number).

Asterisk also supports using the nodes as IP based voter systems (synchronizes the IP link based off of GPS time).
Link Posted: 11/14/2014 4:53:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By zapzap:


I've heard some people state that All-Star allows for 16 bit audio where IRLP only allows for 8 bit audio but can't find anything to back it up.

All-Star is based off of Asterisk PBX which is a linux PBX server and a little program called the app_rpt module. IRLP on the other hand is based off of some closed source programs (which feature the DTMF, repeater ID, and repeater controller) and then the open source Speak Freely VOIP software.

All-Star is free, allowing the user to purchase or build a radio interface (common way to build one is to simply use a computer's existing sound card and serial port to pass audio and control PTT and COR). IRLP you have to purchase the IRLP radio interface (which also is how you obtain a node number).

Asterisk also supports using the nodes as IP based voter systems (synchronizes the IP link based off of GPS time).
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By zapzap:
Originally Posted By Beefington:
Originally Posted By zapzap:
Originally Posted By Beefington:
Interior Alaska is pretty well covered by the Link-Alaska Repeater Project.  At least the highway system is, anyway.


  • Open to ALL properly licensed amateur radio operators

  • Coverage east-west, from Canadian border to Tanana. About 400 miles

  • Coverage north-south, from Yukon River to Anchorage. About 300 miles.

<a href="http://kl7kc.com/repeaters/AARCrptmap.html" target="_blank">http://i.imgur.com/IDPTZHe.gif</a>

I haven't been very active in ham radio since I moved here so I can't speak to the real world performance of the network.


A lot of it is linked through All-Star if I remember correctly. I have a friend who pushes his repeater to the Alaska morning net every Friday.


I haven't heard of All-Star before.  Some googling doesn't reveal much.  Is it just IRLP?  If not, what makes it different?


I've heard some people state that All-Star allows for 16 bit audio where IRLP only allows for 8 bit audio but can't find anything to back it up.

All-Star is based off of Asterisk PBX which is a linux PBX server and a little program called the app_rpt module. IRLP on the other hand is based off of some closed source programs (which feature the DTMF, repeater ID, and repeater controller) and then the open source Speak Freely VOIP software.

All-Star is free, allowing the user to purchase or build a radio interface (common way to build one is to simply use a computer's existing sound card and serial port to pass audio and control PTT and COR). IRLP you have to purchase the IRLP radio interface (which also is how you obtain a node number).

Asterisk also supports using the nodes as IP based voter systems (synchronizes the IP link based off of GPS time).


Very cool, thanks for the education.  I see that Asterisk PBX is released under GPL.  It's good to see open-source standards gaining traction in the hobby after years of crap like WIRES and D-STAR.  Stuff like this is getting me excited about getting back into radio after a couple years of inactivity on my part.  I ordered a Little Tarheel II for the truck the other day and am already working a coax entrance/lightning protection plan for the home I purchased last year.
Link Posted: 11/14/2014 5:56:07 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Beefington:


Very cool, thanks for the education.  I see that Asterisk PBX is released under GPL.  It's good to see open-source standards gaining traction in the hobby after years of crap like WIRES and D-STAR.  Stuff like this is getting me excited about getting back into radio after a couple years of inactivity on my part.  I ordered a Little Tarheel II for the truck the other day and am already working a coax entrance/lightning protection plan for the home I purchased last year.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Beefington:
Originally Posted By zapzap:
Originally Posted By Beefington:
Originally Posted By zapzap:
Originally Posted By Beefington:
Interior Alaska is pretty well covered by the Link-Alaska Repeater Project.  At least the highway system is, anyway.


  • Open to ALL properly licensed amateur radio operators

  • Coverage east-west, from Canadian border to Tanana. About 400 miles

  • Coverage north-south, from Yukon River to Anchorage. About 300 miles.

<a href="http://kl7kc.com/repeaters/AARCrptmap.html" target="_blank">http://i.imgur.com/IDPTZHe.gif</a>

I haven't been very active in ham radio since I moved here so I can't speak to the real world performance of the network.


A lot of it is linked through All-Star if I remember correctly. I have a friend who pushes his repeater to the Alaska morning net every Friday.


I haven't heard of All-Star before.  Some googling doesn't reveal much.  Is it just IRLP?  If not, what makes it different?


I've heard some people state that All-Star allows for 16 bit audio where IRLP only allows for 8 bit audio but can't find anything to back it up.

All-Star is based off of Asterisk PBX which is a linux PBX server and a little program called the app_rpt module. IRLP on the other hand is based off of some closed source programs (which feature the DTMF, repeater ID, and repeater controller) and then the open source Speak Freely VOIP software.

All-Star is free, allowing the user to purchase or build a radio interface (common way to build one is to simply use a computer's existing sound card and serial port to pass audio and control PTT and COR). IRLP you have to purchase the IRLP radio interface (which also is how you obtain a node number).

Asterisk also supports using the nodes as IP based voter systems (synchronizes the IP link based off of GPS time).


Very cool, thanks for the education.  I see that Asterisk PBX is released under GPL.  It's good to see open-source standards gaining traction in the hobby after years of crap like WIRES and D-STAR.  Stuff like this is getting me excited about getting back into radio after a couple years of inactivity on my part.  I ordered a Little Tarheel II for the truck the other day and am already working a coax entrance/lightning protection plan for the home I purchased last year.


The current LTS version of Asterisk is 1.8 and doesn't support the app_rpt module. Hasn't been supported since 1.4.
Link Posted: 11/14/2014 6:02:48 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SCWolverine:
SC has a similar system that coincides with the SCETV folks...nice deal!
SCHeart

http://scheart.us/irlp_web/bridge/irlp-content/upload/status.php?timestamp=1415765696&num=0

of course I've never used it....OP thanks for the reminder!
View Quote


The system works very well. This reminds me, I need to print out a list of SCHEARTS repeaters with access codes and laminate it.
Link Posted: 11/15/2014 4:01:16 AM EDT
Thanks again to everyone who has responded, I had no idea so many VHF and UHF networks were out there.  Please post more if you know of any that haven't been covered.
Link Posted: 11/15/2014 8:58:44 AM EDT
From Former and Future Show Guest George Z:

SF Bay Area the "Bay-Net":
http://www.bay-net.org/

The Intertie was mentioned earlier
Link Posted: 11/15/2014 9:32:51 AM EDT
Notice that SCHearts is blind in the NE corner of the state. Kind of strange PalsNet didn't join in.
http://www.palsnet.com/
Link Posted: 11/15/2014 10:02:43 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BroncoGlenn:
The WINS (Western Intertie Network) has repeaters up and down CA and scattered elsewhere in the southwest and PNW.  
Coverage map
Repeater list.
View Quote


+1 for the WIN System.  They started out focused on CA, but there are now over 90 nodes connected full time, including some I hear in Hawaii, TX, FL, NJ, UK and Australia.

Also out west, there is the Western Reflector.  The ARFCOM Friday Net is hosted on one of the nodes.  http://www.westernreflector.com/
Link Posted: 11/15/2014 10:36:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/15/2014 5:11:52 PM EDT by MCSquared]
Here is a map of the Saltgrass Repeater System covering SE Texas (+Lubbock) and S Louisiana.

ETA
Spell check
Link Posted: 11/15/2014 11:38:52 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By verticalgain:
Thanks again to everyone who has responded, I had no idea so many VHF and UHF networks were out there.  Please post more if you know of any that haven't been covered.
View Quote


Armadillo Intertie - ties most major Texas towns but it is a closed system and I don't really know how dues are done.

Many of the 900 MHz repeaters in Texas are tied into a 900 MHz only echo link system.
Link Posted: 11/16/2014 12:34:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/16/2014 12:35:49 PM EDT by Libertyhillguy]
The Big Bend Amateur Radio Club
all the repeater are solar and linked by RF
http://www.bigbendarc.com/

coverage map
http://www.bigbendarc.com/REPEATERS/IMAGES/BBARC_Repeater_Coverage_map_2014.jpg
Link Posted: 11/16/2014 8:19:21 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By zapzap:


Armadillo Intertie - ties most major Texas towns but it is a closed system and I don't really know how dues are done.

Many of the 900 MHz repeaters in Texas are tied into a 900 MHz only echo link system.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By zapzap:
Originally Posted By verticalgain:
Thanks again to everyone who has responded, I had no idea so many VHF and UHF networks were out there.  Please post more if you know of any that haven't been covered.


Armadillo Intertie - ties most major Texas towns but it is a closed system and I don't really know how dues are done.

Many of the 900 MHz repeaters in Texas are tied into a 900 MHz only echo link system.


All the Intertie systems, at least as far as I can tell, are all part of Intertie Inc.  I found a list of clubs at one point, but there were none listed as being in my QTH (Dallas area) as far as I could tell.  

This led me to...

The TX area appears to operate by the same rules as Cactus Intertie who's membership page reads as follows:

The first thing most people ask after they discover one of our remote base frequencies and listen for a few minutes is "This sounds like fun, how do I become a member?"

As simplistic as this answer may sound, listen to the system. Listen to the people talking and what they talk about. Truly decide if you desire to become involved in the type of operation that the Cactus Intertie System offers. The system offers a unique blend of technical exchange along with personal ones.

After you decide that Cactus Intertie System membership is for you and offers you the unique aspect of amateur radio that you desire, and you truly want to become involved, listen to the callsigns of the members talking to see if you know someone. With over 1500 members the chances are fairly good that you will. If you don't know any members, continue listening. Many members are involved in, and talk about amateur and other activities they are involved with and you can get to know them through these other activities.

The Cactus Intertie, Inc., as well as all of the affiliate clubs, is a private, dues paying membership organization. In order to use any of the remote base radios within the Cactus Intertie System, you must be a member of either the Cactus Intertie, Inc. or one of the affiliate clubs depending on which area you reside in and where most of your operating will be done.

To become a member, you must be "sponsored" in writing, by a current member in your local area. This written sponsorship can either be a written letter mailed to the Cactus Intertie, Inc. address or a soft copy of the letter e-mailed to the Cactus Intertie, Inc. e-mail address below. The reasons for requiring this type of sponsorship are threefold. First, with the system as large as it is and with over 1500 members, we need to ensure the system is enjoyable for every member to operate. Secondly, we are looking for individuals that will be committed to a long term membership obligation. Many of the people who were members at the inception of the Intertie System in 1973 are still actively involved today. Thirdly, it is the responsibility of the sponsor to provide the basic system operational training to the new member. The management of the Cactus Intertie, Inc. cannot provide this training on a continual basis.

If you would like to have a record on file regarding your interest in membership, drop a postcard or letter with your name, call sign, address, phone number and nearest major city to Cactus Intertie, Inc. at the following address:

Cactus Intertie, Inc.
1107 Fair Oaks Avenue #142
South Pasadena, Ca. 91030-3311

E-Mail: cactus1 at (@) cactus-intertie dot org

We apologize for not providing a direct e-mail address but the web crawlers that distribute spam are unbearable
Note:

If you are located in the Southern California area, the information on this page contains all the information necessary for you to pursue membership in the Cactus Intertie, Inc. You must be sponsored by an existing member with a letter of recommendation. Any correspondence regarding Cactus Intertie, Inc. membership will be kept on file for future reference but will not be responded to. If you live elsewhere, your request will be forwarded to the affiliate group in your local area. Most affiliate groups have similar requirements.
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