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Posted: 2/3/2013 12:51:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2013 12:52:59 PM EDT by GunGoBoom]
This bag has been changing non stop since I got it and I don't expect that to change. I figure an extra set of eyes can't hurt. To give you an idea of my scenario I am currently located in Louisiana and in the event of a SHTF situation I will not be able to bug in so this bag is extra important. This bag is intended to support myself and my wife (and the dog) but my wife does have her own bag to supplement this one.

The bag is a surplus USMC ILBE complete with assault pack.


The contents:

1. Lid
-USGI woodland camo poncho
-Gerber Profile fixed blade knife (I know it's cheap but my brother gave it to me and I like it)
-ACU MOLLE admin pouch
-Tasco 10x25 binoculars
-Flask of fun juice (Not needed but come on )
-1 pencil wrapped with about 5' of OD green duct tape
-1 pen
-1 Sharpie
-1 Novatac SPL 120 flashlight
-1 bandana
-1 brunton compass
-1 camo compac (mirror doubles as signal mirror....I don't paint up like Rambo......but I could)
-1 mini bic lighter
-1 Gerber multi tool
-1 small notepad

2. Radio Pouch
-3 Mountain House meals
-Aluminum mess kit with utensils (utensils fit inside mess kit)
-Microfiber camp towel

3. Main Pack

-Hygiene bag (Fishing/Fire/Cordage/Etc.)
-1 waterproof match container with 2 CR123A batteries
-1 Doan magnesium bar
-ziploc bag of vaseline cotton balls
-50' cheap rope
-6 White's Auto Fishers
-2 small rags (gun cleaning)
-1 cheap headlamp
-small bottle of CLP
-.223 claiber boresnake
-Gerber ceramic knife sharpener (the one that costs like $2)
-75' ish of paracord
-Fishing Kit (assorted hooks, weights, small bobbers, 100yds of 8lb line, assorted small jigs, 6x 24" 30lb steel leaders)
-cheapo lighter
-aluminum foil (about 10 square foot)
-box of waterproof matches
-gun cleaning toothbrush (the small otis one with no handle)

-Hygiene bag (First Aid Kit)
-1 CAT tourniquet
-1 roll of TP
-1 space blanket (disposable type)
-1 small sewing kit
-1 Quikclot combat gauze
-1 large trauma dressing
-1 small spray bottle of rubbing alcohol (Small as in airplane carry on size)
-1 tube of triple antibiotic.....poor kid neosporin
- 5x bandaids
-1 large tip red sharpie
-1 folding toothbrush
-1 tube of toothpaste (First Aid Kit doubles as basic hygiene kit)
-1 small container of water purification tablets
-1 roll of 3m medical tape
-1 pair of latex gloves
-1 package compressed gauze (4.5" X 4.1 yds when opened)
-1 Woodland camo tarp (not sure of the dimensions but it is way too big for my needs)
-USGI thermarest
-OD Green net (I bought this thinking it would work as a hammock, I was wrong but it could still make a good fishing or trapping tool)
-Ziploc bag
-1 tan tshirt
-2 pair of wool socks
-1 fleece watch cap
-1 long sleeve cotton undershirt (Yes I know cotton kills it is a space holder until I get out and pick a wool replacement)
-Ziplock Bag
-1 boonie cap
-1 pair insulated leather work gloves
-neck gaiter (sp?)
-poly pro top and bottom
-Stuff Sack
-Cheap wally world "0 degree" sleeping bag (I haven't been able to test this yet but I don't believe it)
-USGI gortex bivy sack to rescue the cheap sleeping bag

4. Exterior
-1 liter SS water bottle (This is where I need the most advice. I have USGI 1 quarts, 100 oz bladders, etc. I just can't decide what is the best route)
-Assault pack containing reduntant basic items i.e. firestarters, emergency blankets, flashlights, etc. this remains in the truck as a GHB and then attaches to the main bag on the way out of the door. It will have some food rations and water in it but it is not assembled yet.


Typically carry a Kimber Custom II .45 and three mags in the lid and would attempt to grab the AR if possible but it has its own case with mags ammo etc. weight without water, guns, or ammo was about 40 lbs.

Alright square me away. I have thick skin so don't hold back.

Edit: I am planning to pick up a small folding saw to be included as well.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 1:04:39 PM EDT
what emergency are you planning for that would require you to bug out?

is this a walk out of town on foot in a hurricane BOB?

I personally think it is way over done.

Leave the rifle at home and take the wife and dog on a ten mile hike with the bag on your back and your wife's bag on her back and see what both of you think after ten miles.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 1:10:33 PM EDT
I go out with this bag pretty often actually so I know I'm good but you are right I should take the wife along.

I should have mentioned this is also my camping bag. As for the scenario pick your poison. i live on post far enough from the coast to not worry much about hurricanes.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 1:11:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2013 1:14:37 PM EDT by kuffaar]
Looks pretty squared away to me, friend. Good job on the kit!

Lots of fire starting options like you have are a good thing. Plus the redundancy on shelter options with that tarps and such.

Basic first aid items look good. Consider adding over the counter meds like cold/allergy pills and ibuprofen or Tylenol too. I have eye drops in mine as well. Those little comfort items may be needed to keep you going and feeling better.

Did I miss water purification tabs in that list? You may find yourself in a situation where building a fire to purify water is not doable because of security or weather.

Dog chow for Fido? Leash?

You could reduce weight by switching to a Glock, but we all have our personal preferences there

Carrying an AR openly also may invite unwanted attention. Something like a Sub 2000 or other pistol caliber carbine that can be stowed until needed might be a better choice there IMO.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 1:16:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By kuffaar:
Looks pretty squared away to me, friend. Good job on the kit!

Lots of fire starting options like you have are a good thing. Plus the redundancy on shelter options with that tarps and such.

Basic first aid items look good. Consider adding over the counter meds like cold/allergy pills and ibuprofen or Tylenol too. I have eye drops in mine as well. Those little comfort items may be needed to keep you going and feeling better.

Did I miss water purification tabs in that list? You may find yourself in a situation where building a fire to purify water is not doable because of security or weather.

Dog chow for Fido? Leash?

You could reduce weight by switching to a Glock, but we all have our personal preferences there


I never thought about eye drops. Good call

Yes I have water purification tablets in the first aid kit but just a small bottle. Wife will most likely get the dog food and leash but it will be added somewhere.

Thanks for the tips.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 1:17:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2013 1:20:01 PM EDT by GunGoBoom]
Probably wouldn't grab the AR in the open but very true.

Edit: because I can't speak english today. I would not grab the AR if the situation didn't warrant that level of defense.

Link Posted: 2/3/2013 1:22:00 PM EDT
Looks great to me, I would add benedryl and maybe a pain reliever,other than that awesome job.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 1:24:26 PM EDT
Seems to be a consensus on OTC medications. I guess I'll look into that.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 1:35:43 PM EDT
I like the Glock and Sub 2000 combo because the mags are interchangeable. That would reduce your weight a lot and you could remove the AR support items as well to provide room for other items.

The subby folds up to about 18" and I can stuff it in the pack or along the outside easily. Doesn't have the reach of an AR but provides good acuracy out to 100 yards with the same knock down power at that range as a pistol close up.

It took me a couple months to get mine, but I love the thing and they're still a lot less $ than an AR too. Albeit, you alread have an AR. Perhaps something like that as an option for the missus?
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 1:39:38 PM EDT
I've actually been looking at Glocks. .........Well had been until they all disappeared from the shelves......The Kimber is a great pistol but I do agree with what you are saying. That is a definite consideration as $$$ becomes available.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 5:57:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2013 6:09:37 PM EDT by rallykid]
Not sure what the other fire starters are you mentioned but never hurts to have another. Something like a blast match. Also not sure if I overlooked it but what about a small backpacking stove? I have 2 MSR's. One is a well used and abused Pocket Rocket I bought around 2004 I just put in the wife's pack because I just picked up a Micro Rocket today. I can fit an 8oz fuel canister and Micro Rocket inside my .95 liter mess kit. My Pocket Rocket will boil water for 3 meals per day for 6 days on 1 8 ounce fuel canister. Well worth the weight penalty.


I am in process of rebuilding my GHB/BOB completely and just ordered a new pack to test. If it works well and holds up I will be rebuilding the wife's as well and setting them up identically.

One thing I would change is to ditch the cheap mess kit. They just don't work and fall apart after a couple of uses. I picked up an Optimus Terra HE kit for $30 and so far so good. Also check out the GSI Pinnacle sets. With mountain house you are mostly just boiling water to eat so you don't need a full mess kit. I tossed a titanium spork in the kit and called it good. Works well for freeze dried since I just eat it out of the pouch.

Also look at a water filter. I like my Katadyn Hiker Pro a lot. I also carry a wide mouth Nalgene in addition to my 3 liter hydration bladder. I can store things in it until needed and it makes transporting water from one place to another convenient. Also my Katadyn will connect directly to the small or large mouth Nalgene bottles as well as my hydration pack.

Edit: just saw you had a blood stopper so deleted that suggestion
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 6:13:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2013 6:17:19 PM EDT by GunGoBoom]
I don't have a stove, I just can't justify carrying a small fireplace with me when I could just build a fire. That said, I have never used a backpacking stove so I really have no excuse not to try it out. I will definitely check out the mess kits. My concern with the filters is if I don't spend bookoo $$$ it might filter bacteria but not viruses and then I just have a false sense of security when I could have just boiled and been done with it (If I am wrong please let me know).

It seems like you have done some backpacking so I will definitely consider your suggestions. Thanks.

Edit: just checked this out maybe I could be convinced.........http://www.optimusstoves.com/seen/optimus-products/products/katadynshopconnect/optimus-outdoor-kocher/optimus-crux-lite-solo-kochsystem/
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 6:30:07 PM EDT
The optimus Crux is not bad, stay away from the light. I recommend the MSR stoves and they are about the same price. Pocket Rocket is $39 and the Micro Rocket it $59. A light stove and canister isn't much of a weight penalty and the convenience is too much to pass up for me. Plus inside the mess kit it takes up no extra space.

I use the water filter in combination with the purification tabs just to add the extra measure of protection. Of course having done my bouts with bad water I also filter anything I am going to boil. That was NOT a fun trip and not one I am anxious to relive.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 6:39:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By rallykid:
The optimus Crux is not bad, stay away from the light. I recommend the MSR stoves and they are about the same price. Pocket Rocket is $39 and the Micro Rocket it $59. A light stove and canister isn't much of a weight penalty and the convenience is too much to pass up for me. Plus inside the mess kit it takes up no extra space.

I use the water filter in combination with the purification tabs just to add the extra measure of protection. Of course having done my bouts with bad water I also filter anything I am going to boil. That was NOT a fun trip and not one I am anxious to relive.


Sorry to hear that
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 6:59:46 PM EDT
It was not fun. 745 miles from home and 680 miles from my destination. Lost 3 days out of a 3 week trip laid up in Tennessee. Cut our stay short in Texas by a couple of days but still finished the trip there and then back to Michigan. It was a valuable lesson and not one I am soon to forget. I am OCD about my water now.
Link Posted: 2/3/2013 7:12:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/3/2013 7:16:27 PM EDT by PATCH5]
Only thing I see that hasn't been pointed out:
if you have 550 cord, you need a couple of carabiners. One weight bearing, two lighter ones, just clip em onto the molle somewhere. I always use them for shit, and it seams like every time I use 550 cord, I use a carabiner to go with it.

Think fido. If you are improvising a leash with 550 cord, whatcha want to use to attach it to the D ring on his collar, why a carabiner of course.

a cravat or two or four are always handy. If you live on post, just hit up a 68W for a few. Might cost you a beer if he is a dick, but they are fucking useful. Sweat rag, sling, cover for a dressing, bag for foraged food, gag for the wife after mile #8, the cravat does it all.

Looking at that bag, it looks big and heavy. That may not be a problem for you at this stage of your life, for me it is a huge issue though. I broke my neck in 2004 on Ft Polk. While my recovery and surgery went very well, the biggest lasting effect is that anything over a 20lb total weight ruck will debilitate me for a long while. DOesn't matter how much I work out, or what kind of shape I am in, heavy packs and pullups are a no go. That being said, right up until the day I broke my neck, I rucked fifty lb ruck with a 30lb aid bag on top of it for a paycheck as a light infantry medic. In fact, I was wearing that aid bag when I broke me neck, terrible day. Broke a pretty important bone and found out I was allergic to morphine in the same day. FUCK FT POLK.
So, the moral of the story, be aware that you might not always be able to hump a big ol ruck around. Sometimes all it takes is one injury and you might have to ditch a lot of the weight. Just keep that in mind.
Link Posted: 2/4/2013 2:09:19 AM EDT
water.
i riun a combo of
nalgene bottle- 1 liter
a full cbak -3 liters
and i keep 3x 2liter platypus's rolled up for in camp
filters- i run a katadyn mini while the wife has ahiker. I also carry sweetwater treatment drops and a survival straw as back up.


mess kit- im not a fan of them. With mnt house your boiling h20 and can eat it outta the bag. Get a stainless of TI cup that will let a nalgene nest in it. drop the fork spoon junk and get a good TI or alloy spork.
Keep your IFAK separate from your hygene and pack where its easy to get to. have some moleskin.

as pointed out get the wife unit to start hiking.

go backpacking for 2-3 days you'll trim off the crap you dont use as will she. Then add what you need for the BOB.
Link Posted: 2/4/2013 3:09:52 AM EDT
Looks a little heavy to me.

How heavy is it? Have you walked much with it yet?

My winter time load came in just over 40 lbs without my pistol, over rough terrain it was more than I wanted to carry, my 3 season load is about half that though, I can run or walk briskly for a good set with my bag on.
Link Posted: 2/8/2013 8:06:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2013 8:06:58 PM EDT by KTMsx]
You have toothpaste....what about a couple tooth brushes?
Maybe I just missed that, but I did not see it on your list.

Never mind...I see you have a folding one.
My bad.
Link Posted: 2/8/2013 8:43:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2013 8:49:35 PM EDT by Mxpatriot51]
Looks pretty good, if I were you I would focus on expanding your first aid supplies and knowledge. If you ever end up treating a catastrophic event (multiple gun shots wounds, bad car accident ,etc.) you will find that an IFAK (or similar) is not going to cut it. Look at expanding your collection of compression bandages, tourniquets, and dressings. You're far more likely to come upon someone in need of immediate medical assistance than you are to have to bug out on foot, but the tools and knowledge are helpful either way.

Look at getting instruction on and starting to carry:

Nasopharyngeal airway tube, to establish an airway when dealing with trauma to the face. http://narescue.com/Nasopharyngeal_Airway_28F_with_Lubricant-CN0E4FF2729817.html?BC=34151F4E0C15

Needle decompression pen, to ventilate a chest cavity in order to relieve a collapsed lung. http://narescue.com/ARS_for_Needle_Decompression_(10_gauge_x_3.25_in.)-CN7E3B6AE02718.html?BC=34151F4E0C15

One way chest valves, to treat a sucking chest wood. http://narescue.com/HyFin_Chest_Seal-CN1BB57448570E.html?BC=34151F4E0C15

These aren't the kind of items you buy, read the instructions for, and just start carrying. But I'm sure if you looked around you could find a class offering instruction in their use, or may even be able to find some firefighters/EMS willing to give you a few tips. These items will drastically improve your ability to save someone's life in an emergency, particularly if the "S" has found the rotary device and there is not a fire department or EMS team to respond immediately.


I would ditch some or all of the mountain house meals and replace with a few power bars. You can go quite a long time without food, water not so much. If you are moving on foot in any sort of heat you will consume a lot of water, quickly. You need to eat to retain to water but how many people do you hear about dying of starvation vs dehydration?

I didn't notice any, but there's a lot to read in your post, do you have some chemlights? Different colors help as well, especially if you're trying to set a path for family/friends to follow. Some sort of back up power source for your cell phone isn't a bad idea either.

Link Posted: 2/8/2013 9:52:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2013 10:06:28 PM EDT by zirkdog]
Originally Posted By GunGoBoom:
This bag has been changing non stop since I got it and I don't expect that to change. I figure an extra set of eyes can't hurt. To give you an idea of my scenario I am currently located in Louisiana and in the event of a SHTF situation I will not be able to bug in so this bag is extra important. This bag is intended to support myself and my wife (and the dog) but my wife does have her own bag to supplement this one.

The bag is a surplus USMC ILBE complete with assault pack.
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/233_zpsd7b778f3.jpg
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/242_zpsd4d0caf1.jpg
The contents:
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/234_zpsef00ff0e.jpg
1. Lid
-USGI woodland camo poncho
-Gerber Profile fixed blade knife (I know it's cheap but my brother gave it to me and I like it)
-ACU MOLLE admin pouch
-Tasco 10x25 binoculars
-Flask of fun juice (Not needed but come on )
-1 pencil wrapped with about 5' of OD green duct tape
-1 pen
-1 Sharpie
-1 Novatac SPL 120 flashlight
-1 bandana
-1 brunton compass
-1 camo compac (mirror doubles as signal mirror....I don't paint up like Rambo......but I could). If it's just for the mirror, then ditch it and get a mirror.
-1 mini bic lighter
-1 Gerber multi tool
-1 small notepad
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/236_zps5e36c9ec.jpg
2. Radio Pouch
-3 Mountain House meals
-Aluminum mess kit with utensils (utensils fit inside mess kit)Useless. MH meals are eaten right out of the bag. You need one small pot to boil 2 cups of water. That's it. I use a GSI Microdualist Pot/Cup combo and that's even to much sometimes. It also holds me stove (Snow Peak Giga power) and fuel canister.
-Microfiber camp towel
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/240_zps417926e5.jpg
3. Main Pack
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/237_zpscc23b263.jpg
-Hygiene bag (Fishing/Fire/Cordage/Etc.)
-1 waterproof match container with 2 CR123A batteries
-1 Doan magnesium bar
-ziploc bag of vaseline cotton balls
-50' cheap rope. Just stick with the paracord. Probably stronger and infinitely more uses.
-6 White's Auto Fishers
-2 small rags (gun cleaning)
-1 cheap headlamp
-small bottle of CLP
-.223 claiber boresnake
-Gerber ceramic knife sharpener (the one that costs like $2)
-75' ish of paracord
-Fishing Kit (assorted hooks, weights, small bobbers, 100yds of 8lb line, assorted small jigs, 6x 24" 30lb steel leaders)
-cheapo lighter
-aluminum foil (about 10 square foot)
-box of waterproof matches
-gun cleaning toothbrush (the small otis one with no handle)
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/238_zps8de4a5cb.jpg
-Hygiene bag (First Aid Kit)
-1 CAT tourniquet
-1 roll of TP
-1 space blanket (disposable type)
-1 small sewing kit
-1 Quikclot combat gauze
-1 large trauma dressing
-1 small spray bottle of rubbing alcohol (Small as in airplane carry on size)
-1 tube of triple antibiotic.....poor kid neosporin
- 5x bandaids
-1 large tip red sharpie
-1 folding toothbrush
-1 tube of toothpaste (First Aid Kit doubles as basic hygiene kit)
-1 small container of water purification tablets
-1 roll of 3m medical tape
-1 pair of latex gloves
-1 package compressed gauze (4.5" X 4.1 yds when opened)
-1 Woodland camo tarp (not sure of the dimensions but it is way too big for my needs)
-USGI thermarest
-OD Green net (I bought this thinking it would work as a hammock, I was wrong but it could still make a good fishing or trapping tool)Ditch it. If you can't justify it and you're bringing it, "Just in case" out it goes.
-Ziploc bag
-1 tan tshirt
-2 pair of wool socks
-1 fleece watch cap
-1 long sleeve cotton undershirt (Yes I know cotton kills it is a space holder until I get out and pick a wool replacement)
-Ziplock Bag
-1 boonie cap
-1 pair insulated leather work gloves
-neck gaiter (sp?)
-poly pro top and bottom
-Stuff Sack
-Cheap wally world "0 degree" sleeping bag (I haven't been able to test this yet but I don't believe it)Time to upgrade. For a Wally World bag to be good to 0 degrees it has to be HEAVY. My North Face bag is 0 degrees and weight just under 4lbs. Your's is probably 5-6+ lbs. How cold does Louisiana get? If you're planning on cold, then your clothing choices need another insulation layer like a puffy or fleece jacket.
-USGI gortex bivy sack to rescue the cheap sleeping bag
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/244_zps273082da.jpg
4. Exterior
-1 liter SS water bottle (This is where I need the most advice. I have USGI 1 quarts, 100 oz bladders, etc. I just can't decide what is the best route) I use Nalgene water bottles. They also make a collapsible reservoir too.
-Assault pack containing reduntant basic items i.e. firestarters, emergency blankets, flashlights, etc. this remains in the truck as a GHB and then attaches to the main bag on the way out of the door. It will have some food rations and water in it but it is not assembled yet.


Typically carry a Kimber Custom II .45 and three mags in the lid and would attempt to grab the AR if possible but it has its own case with mags ammo etc. weight without water, guns, or ammo was about 40 lbs.

Alright square me away. I have thick skin so don't hold back.

Edit: I am planning to pick up a small folding saw to be included as well.


Link Posted: 2/8/2013 10:00:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2013 10:00:50 PM EDT by zirkdog]
Originally Posted By GunGoBoom:
I don't have a stove, I just can't justify carrying a small fireplace with me when I could just build a fire. That said, I have never used a backpacking stove so I really have no excuse not to try it out. I will definitely check out the mess kits. My concern with the filters is if I don't spend bookoo $$$ it might filter bacteria but not viruses and then I just have a false sense of security when I could have just boiled and been done with it (If I am wrong please let me know).

It seems like you have done some backpacking so I will definitely consider your suggestions. Thanks.

Edit: just checked this out maybe I could be convinced.........http://www.optimusstoves.com/seen/optimus-products/products/katadynshopconnect/optimus-outdoor-kocher/optimus-crux-lite-solo-kochsystem/


Read up on the locations where viruses and bacteria are found in water. Viruses are mainly found in urban areas with exposed sewage/runoff water and if you choose to filter straight from a cow turd pond. if that applies to you then be concerned. For my area, it's not a concern. Unless it's some SHTF mega-bio-chem-WMD- attack, in which case we're all hosed.
Link Posted: 2/9/2013 12:00:20 AM EDT
Missing Zip-Ties.

100's of uses.

100 ties for $1.50
Link Posted: 2/9/2013 5:22:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2013 5:25:17 AM EDT by cfcw]
Neat looking setup. Why does my bag always look so sloppy?

One glaring omission though(unless I missed something) is calories. You need lotsa calories.2500 calories a day is barely enough for me. By the looks of it You've got less than half a day's worth of calories in your bag. By the second day of not eating enough calories many people will start taking unecessary risks to get something to eat. This will likely mean shucking some other stuff, but an energy bar takes priority in my bag. If nothing else throw a huge friggin jar of JIF peanut butter in there.

Keep me warm, keep me hydrated, keep me fed, and I can deal with most everything else.
Link Posted: 2/17/2013 8:42:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/18/2013 7:52:59 PM EDT by GunGoBoom]
Originally Posted By zirkdog:
Originally Posted By GunGoBoom:
This bag has been changing non stop since I got it and I don't expect that to change. I figure an extra set of eyes can't hurt. To give you an idea of my scenario I am currently located in Louisiana and in the event of a SHTF situation I will not be able to bug in so this bag is extra important. This bag is intended to support myself and my wife (and the dog) but my wife does have her own bag to supplement this one.

The bag is a surplus USMC ILBE complete with assault pack.
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/233_zpsd7b778f3.jpg
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/242_zpsd4d0caf1.jpg
The contents:
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/234_zpsef00ff0e.jpg
1. Lid
-USGI woodland camo poncho
-Gerber Profile fixed blade knife (I know it's cheap but my brother gave it to me and I like it)
-ACU MOLLE admin pouch
-Tasco 10x25 binoculars
-Flask of fun juice (Not needed but come on )
-1 pencil wrapped with about 5' of OD green duct tape
-1 pen
-1 Sharpie
-1 Novatac SPL 120 flashlight
-1 bandana
-1 brunton compass
-1 camo compac (mirror doubles as signal mirror....I don't paint up like Rambo......but I could). If it's just for the mirror, then ditch it and get a mirror.
-1 mini bic lighter
-1 Gerber multi tool
-1 small notepad
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/236_zps5e36c9ec.jpg
2. Radio Pouch
-3 Mountain House meals
-Aluminum mess kit with utensils (utensils fit inside mess kit)Useless. MH meals are eaten right out of the bag. You need one small pot to boil 2 cups of water. That's it. I use a GSI Microdualist Pot/Cup combo and that's even to much sometimes. It also holds me stove (Snow Peak Giga power) and fuel canister.
-Microfiber camp towel
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/240_zps417926e5.jpg
3. Main Pack
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/237_zpscc23b263.jpg
-Hygiene bag (Fishing/Fire/Cordage/Etc.)
-1 waterproof match container with 2 CR123A batteries
-1 Doan magnesium bar
-ziploc bag of vaseline cotton balls
-50' cheap rope. Just stick with the paracord. Probably stronger and infinitely more uses.
-6 White's Auto Fishers
-2 small rags (gun cleaning)
-1 cheap headlamp
-small bottle of CLP
-.223 claiber boresnake
-Gerber ceramic knife sharpener (the one that costs like $2)
-75' ish of paracord
-Fishing Kit (assorted hooks, weights, small bobbers, 100yds of 8lb line, assorted small jigs, 6x 24" 30lb steel leaders)
-cheapo lighter
-aluminum foil (about 10 square foot)
-box of waterproof matches
-gun cleaning toothbrush (the small otis one with no handle)
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/238_zps8de4a5cb.jpg
-Hygiene bag (First Aid Kit)
-1 CAT tourniquet
-1 roll of TP
-1 space blanket (disposable type)
-1 small sewing kit
-1 Quikclot combat gauze
-1 large trauma dressing
-1 small spray bottle of rubbing alcohol (Small as in airplane carry on size)
-1 tube of triple antibiotic.....poor kid neosporin
- 5x bandaids
-1 large tip red sharpie
-1 folding toothbrush
-1 tube of toothpaste (First Aid Kit doubles as basic hygiene kit)
-1 small container of water purification tablets
-1 roll of 3m medical tape
-1 pair of latex gloves
-1 package compressed gauze (4.5" X 4.1 yds when opened)
-1 Woodland camo tarp (not sure of the dimensions but it is way too big for my needs)
-USGI thermarest
-OD Green net (I bought this thinking it would work as a hammock, I was wrong but it could still make a good fishing or trapping tool)Ditch it. If you can't justify it and you're bringing it, "Just in case" out it goes.
-Ziploc bag
-1 tan tshirt
-2 pair of wool socks
-1 fleece watch cap
-1 long sleeve cotton undershirt (Yes I know cotton kills it is a space holder until I get out and pick a wool replacement)
-Ziplock Bag
-1 boonie cap
-1 pair insulated leather work gloves
-neck gaiter (sp?)
-poly pro top and bottom
-Stuff Sack
-Cheap wally world "0 degree" sleeping bag (I haven't been able to test this yet but I don't believe it)Time to upgrade. For a Wally World bag to be good to 0 degrees it has to be HEAVY. My North Face bag is 0 degrees and weight just under 4lbs. Your's is probably 5-6+ lbs. How cold does Louisiana get? If you're planning on cold, then your clothing choices need another insulation layer like a puffy or fleece jacket.
-USGI gortex bivy sack to rescue the cheap sleeping bag
http://i1294.photobucket.com/albums/b603/Jon_Beauchamp/USMC%20ILBE/244_zps273082da.jpg
4. Exterior
-1 liter SS water bottle (This is where I need the most advice. I have USGI 1 quarts, 100 oz bladders, etc. I just can't decide what is the best route) I use Nalgene water bottles. They also make a collapsible reservoir too.
-Assault pack containing reduntant basic items i.e. firestarters, emergency blankets, flashlights, etc. this remains in the truck as a GHB and then attaches to the main bag on the way out of the door. It will have some food rations and water in it but it is not assembled yet.


Typically carry a Kimber Custom II .45 and three mags in the lid and would attempt to grab the AR if possible but it has its own case with mags ammo etc. weight without water, guns, or ammo was about 40 lbs.

Alright square me away. I have thick skin so don't hold back.

Edit: I am planning to pick up a small folding saw to be included as well.




Thanks . This is exactly the kind of response I was looking for.

Camo Compac is gone.

Net is gone but the mesh bag it was in became my cordage bag.

Rope is gone (added more paracord).

Mess kit is gone replaced with two canteen cups (one on each canteen).

Water system is changed to two 1 qt canteens and a sawyer .1 squeeze filter.

switched to usgi intermediate bag and bivy (weight was similar to cheap wally world bag so why not).

Binos are gone.

Fishing kit has been streamlined down to 3 auto fishers and a smaller amount of fishing line.

Gerber Profile replaced with Mora Companion.

Ditched the radio pouch.

Added a small folding saw (will be replaced with a Laplander when the wife stops wanting to kill me)

Added some tuna pouches, drink mix, etc.

The ideas are great I am sitting at 42 lbs now including food, water, 1911, and ammo. I know it is still heavy for some peoples' taste but remember this is a 4 season bag.

Link Posted: 2/17/2013 9:01:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Mxpatriot51:
Looks pretty good, if I were you I would focus on expanding your first aid supplies and knowledge. If you ever end up treating a catastrophic event (multiple gun shots wounds, bad car accident ,etc.) you will find that an IFAK (or similar) is not going to cut it. Look at expanding your collection of compression bandages, tourniquets, and dressings. You're far more likely to come upon someone in need of immediate medical assistance than you are to have to bug out on foot, but the tools and knowledge are helpful either way.

Look at getting instruction on and starting to carry:

Nasopharyngeal airway tube, to establish an airway when dealing with trauma to the face. http://narescue.com/Nasopharyngeal_Airway_28F_with_Lubricant-CN0E4FF2729817.html?BC=34151F4E0C15

Needle decompression pen, to ventilate a chest cavity in order to relieve a collapsed lung. http://narescue.com/ARS_for_Needle_Decompression_(10_gauge_x_3.25_in.)-CN7E3B6AE02718.html?BC=34151F4E0C15

One way chest valves, to treat a sucking chest wood. http://narescue.com/HyFin_Chest_Seal-CN1BB57448570E.html?BC=34151F4E0C15

These aren't the kind of items you buy, read the instructions for, and just start carrying. But I'm sure if you looked around you could find a class offering instruction in their use, or may even be able to find some firefighters/EMS willing to give you a few tips. These items will drastically improve your ability to save someone's life in an emergency, particularly if the "S" has found the rotary device and there is not a fire department or EMS team to respond immediately.


I would ditch some or all of the mountain house meals and replace with a few power bars. You can go quite a long time without food, water not so much. If you are moving on foot in any sort of heat you will consume a lot of water, quickly. You need to eat to retain to water but how many people do you hear about dying of starvation vs dehydration?

I didn't notice any, but there's a lot to read in your post, do you have some chemlights? Different colors help as well, especially if you're trying to set a path for family/friends to follow. Some sort of back up power source for your cell phone isn't a bad idea either.



I have had multiple advanced CLS courses and first responder courses. I have needles for decompressions but in the event I need to decompress a pneumothorax the victim is going to need advanced care that I can't carry in my bag. Chest seals can be made easily with any random piece of plastic in my bag and some medical tape (in the bag) without spending the money on an Asherman. As for NPA's I have some at the casa and will add one to the bag. On to the food.......the food is NOT intended to support me or my wife long term. It is strictly a comfort item to sustain some sort of civility long enough for me to establish a camp and start hunting and fishing. I do not have any chemlights and originally did not intend to use them but I have recently heaqrd some convincing arguments for them. Still on the fence but under consideration. Power source for the phone.....no.....I hate my phone now and I am not lugging it around in a SHTF situation. Thanks for the tips.
Link Posted: 2/17/2013 9:03:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GunGoBoom:
Originally Posted By Mxpatriot51:
Looks pretty good, if I were you I would focus on expanding your first aid supplies and knowledge. If you ever end up treating a catastrophic event (multiple gun shots wounds, bad car accident ,etc.) you will find that an IFAK (or similar) is not going to cut it. Look at expanding your collection of compression bandages, tourniquets, and dressings. You're far more likely to come upon someone in need of immediate medical assistance than you are to have to bug out on foot, but the tools and knowledge are helpful either way.

Look at getting instruction on and starting to carry:

Nasopharyngeal airway tube, to establish an airway when dealing with trauma to the face. http://narescue.com/Nasopharyngeal_Airway_28F_with_Lubricant-CN0E4FF2729817.html?BC=34151F4E0C15

Needle decompression pen, to ventilate a chest cavity in order to relieve a collapsed lung. http://narescue.com/ARS_for_Needle_Decompression_(10_gauge_x_3.25_in.)-CN7E3B6AE02718.html?BC=34151F4E0C15

One way chest valves, to treat a sucking chest wood. http://narescue.com/HyFin_Chest_Seal-CN1BB57448570E.html?BC=34151F4E0C15

These aren't the kind of items you buy, read the instructions for, and just start carrying. But I'm sure if you looked around you could find a class offering instruction in their use, or may even be able to find some firefighters/EMS willing to give you a few tips. These items will drastically improve your ability to save someone's life in an emergency, particularly if the "S" has found the rotary device and there is not a fire department or EMS team to respond immediately.


I would ditch some or all of the mountain house meals and replace with a few power bars. You can go quite a long time without food, water not so much. If you are moving on foot in any sort of heat you will consume a lot of water, quickly. You need to eat to retain to water but how many people do you hear about dying of starvation vs dehydration?

I didn't notice any, but there's a lot to read in your post, do you have some chemlights? Different colors help as well, especially if you're trying to set a path for family/friends to follow. Some sort of back up power source for your cell phone isn't a bad idea either.



I have had multiple advanced CLS courses and first responder courses. I have needles for decompressions but in the event I need to decompress a pneumothorax the victim is going to need advanced care that I can't carry in my bag. Chest seals can be made easily with any random piece of plastic in my bag and some medical tape (in the bag) without spending the money on an Asherman. As for NPA's I have some at the casa and will add one to the bag. On to the food.......the food is NOT intended to support me or my wife long term. It is strictly a comfort item to sustain some sort of civility long enough for me to establish a camp and start hunting and fishing. I do not have any chemlights and originally did not intend to use them but I have recently heaqrd some convincing arguments for them. Still on the fence but under consideration. Power source for the phone.....no.....I hate my phone now and I am not lugging it around in a SHTF situation. Thanks for the tips.


Edit: Sorry didn't see that part Disregard the advanced care portion of my response.
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