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Splitting ax or Maul (Page 1 of 2)
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Posted: 7/10/2018 9:58:58 PM EDT
I have a wood stove to heat up the house.

I just bought a Husky 550XP and have fallen in love with it.

However, I am in the stage of need regarding my splitting.

I am borrowing an old fashioned Maul. However, it is going to be needed by the owner.

I have looked online at this and found a company called Fiskars. I have read the hatchet and ax thread but didn't see anything that answers my question.

At 6'4" I am wanting something that has a little longer handle (unless of course there is a short handle that needs me to put the log on a stump), and is high quality.

So my questions:

1. Should I get a splitting ax or stick with a maul (get both is not feesable for me at this time ). Which is more feesable for making the quickest work of the wood?

2. What company which is high quality and keeps a sharp blade?

3. What is the major points I should consider or advice I should know while I am researching?

Thanks all.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:33:44 PM EDT
How big and what type of wood. I have cut wood that required a maul and a wedge.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:35:41 PM EDT
I like a maul. Sharp blade on one side, big bad hammer head on the back side for the splitting wedge.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:38:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/10/2018 10:41:16 PM EDT by Jarem08]
I am not 100% sure what the trees are exactly.

I have gone through oak, some said there were a few pines in my pile, there is one tree that i have no idea what it was, but all I know was it took my 8lb maul, and my full 234 lb weight and force behind it and it still took over 20 strikes.

I have also seen what I think is cherry. At least that was what someone told me. Maybe even cedar (which is in my pile right now).

ETA: I have used some wedges before, but those were borrowed as well, I am still able to use the maul but if the owner needs it, I am down to an old ax that has a very bad handle. I probably need to pick up some wedges. How many should I start with? The ones I used were purchased over time so he had about 8.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:42:01 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By madwis15:
I like a maul. Sharp blade on one side, big bad hammer head on the back side for the splitting wedge.
View Quote
This. Doesn't matter brand names and such,it's a blunt force tool.
Just get good at knowing your wood and where to strike (grains and such).
Also get a couple wedges,you'll probably need them. And spare handles if you're new.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:43:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By madwis15:
I like a maul. Sharp blade on one side, big bad hammer head on the back side for the splitting wedge.
View Quote
same here
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:43:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/10/2018 10:50:39 PM EDT by HEIT_APDST]
When I use wood for heat and cut/split my own I usually used a traditional maul and wedges
for the oak and hickory i burned but I also had a Monster Maul like this one:

Attachment Attached File


Brute of a weapon. heavy enough that the weight did alot of the work if you were a hoss
that could swing it. The thick angle of the "blade" could really bust 'em open. The all-steel welded
construction meant no broken handles.

oh, and get a nice SHARP single bit ax for making kindling

If your new to splitting wood, here's handy tip.
Find the biggest natural crack in well-seasoned wood and make that your first split.
Like this:

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:43:40 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By madwis15:
I like a maul. Sharp blade on one side, big bad hammer head on the back side for the splitting wedge.
View Quote
I agree. I do like my maul. But This is the first time I ever had to cut or split wood.

I just got my first chainsaw and glad I went with what I did. But this is all new to me and I am sorry if I don't ask the right questions.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:47:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/10/2018 10:48:22 PM EDT by Jarem08]
Monster maul is one that I heard of.

I can't say I am a hulk, but I am not weak either. Either way...a little heavier weight may help me get into shaoe, no?

It seems then that wedges are a good thing to get. I will look at that.

As far as wooden handles go, I am a tad bit concerned that they will split easily. Is this an unfounded fear? I am not picky on either, just wondering.

Next thought, it seems that a maul is a maul is a maul, regardless of manufacturer. Am I reading this right?
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:50:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By OLO2:

This. Doesn't matter brand names and such,it's a blunt force tool.
Just get good at knowing your wood and where to strike (grains and such).
Also get a couple wedges,you'll probably need them. And spare handles if you're new.
View Quote
This is where I am really unsure about. I am studying my strikes on the different wood and how the grain is.

I found that knots are not fun!

It seems that if I try to strike the wood right on one of the grain almost between the ring, I can get a decent strike if not a complete split.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:53:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By HEIT_APDST:
When I use wood for heat and cut/split my own I usually used a traditional maul and wedges
for the oak and hickory i burned but I also had a Monster Maul like this one:

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/15109/download-603926.JPG

Brute of a weapon. heavy enough that the weight did alot of the work if you were a hoss
that could swing it. The thick angle of the "blade" could really bust 'em open. The all-steel welded
construction meant no broken handles.

oh, and get a nice SHARP single bit ax for making kindling

If your new to splitting wood, here's handy tip.
Find the biggest natural crack in well-seasoned wood and make that your first split.
Like this:

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/15109/001-603930.JPG
View Quote
This is where I am at now. I try to use the natural splits as they appear.

It looks like you are working your way around the log, hitting at different went angles? I just hit from one way.

Maybe that is why I am not getting through quickly.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:53:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/10/2018 10:59:40 PM EDT by HEIT_APDST]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Jarem08:
Monster maul is one that I heard of.

I can't say I am a hulk, but I am not weak either. Either way...a little heavier weight may help me get into shaoe, no?

It seems then that wedges are a good thing to get. I will look at that.

As far as wooden handles go, I am a tad bit concerned that they will split easily. Is this an unfounded fear? I am not picky on either, just wondering.

Next thought, it seems that a maul is a maul is a maul, regardless of manufacturer. Am I reading this right?
View Quote
You will typically break a handle by over shooting the end of the log and smacking the handle on the far side. That will break a handle.
Good hickory handles will last forever if taken care of like any quality tool.

ETA: I just split from one direction at a time, I just highlighted the the two best natural cracks to illustrate the point.
When starting a new log I would hit the widest point in the crack first then hit to the inside or outside of my first swing
moving outward to the edges.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 10:57:31 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By HEIT_APDST:

You will typically break a handle by over shooting the end of the log and smacking the handle on the far side. That will break a handle.
Good hickory handles will last forever if taken care of like any quality tool.
View Quote
Good to know.

I usually position a little further back than forward. I may go into the ground in front (not often) but my handle is saved.

I also saw something that is a double head or single head. Since that is mainly dealing with an ax, I shouldn't have to worry about that here then.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 11:09:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/10/2018 11:15:09 PM EDT by HEIT_APDST]
I hope this isn't too obvious.
Get a really big butt end of a log to use as a splitting anvil. Cut it good and square on both ends about 18" high and wider than tall so it doesn't fall over.
Set it on a level patch of ground.

This is good for three reasons:
1. If made at the proper height, your strike should hit the log at the best point in your swing for the greatest mechanical advantage
2. This will keep you from tiring as quickly because you're not swinging as far.
3. It keeps you from sinking your blade into the dirt and rocks. Protect your tools.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 11:32:33 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Jarem08:
I am not 100% sure what the trees are exactly.

I have gone through oak, some said there were a few pines in my pile, there is one tree that i have no idea what it was, but all I know was it took my 8lb maul, and my full 234 lb weight and force behind it and it still took over 20 strikes.

I have also seen what I think is cherry. At least that was what someone told me. Maybe even cedar (which is in my pile right now).
View Quote
Be careful with evergreen woods like pine and cedar. They burn really fast and really hot. I only used cedar for kindling.
They are good for starting fires and getting a stove hot quickly but don't load up a stove with pine and walk away. It can ruin the stove or cause a flue fire.
Pine to me isn't even worth the effort, it burns too fast to sustain a long heat-producing fire, it's messy and sappy, and the high amount of resins build up quickly
in your chimney which is dangerous and causes you to have to clean it more often. Seasoned hardwoods are just the way to go, since you're in VA you should
have access to quality firewood.
Link Posted: 7/10/2018 11:52:28 PM EDT
Depends on what you're splitting. I use a couple of gas-powered splitters these days, as Cottonwood can have gnarly grain. I split a piece the other day that was so tough and fibrous with curly grain that the center piece ended up looking like a messed up afro.

For easy straight grain wood, a single or double bit axe will work well. For oak I'd use a maul and wedge, some pieces will split nicely, some will only split with prayer and fasting.

Go watch some Buckin' Billy Ray splitting videos on YouTube, and that barefoot farm girl!
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 5:46:01 AM EDT
Fiskars x27.

Place
10-12 rounds on the ground and cinch them together with a tie down strap.

Whack them all from one side then move to hit them from 90*.

Easier and faster than a powered splitter IMO.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 6:07:17 AM EDT
craftsmen maul. I split wood for 15 years with one. I like to split from the top down on the log it seems to go easier. fatter side down in other words. use the cracks. if u have to use a wedge take that piece back to the woods when u go for the next load
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 7:04:09 AM EDT
Fiskars 31.5 splitting axe. I haven't picked up anything else since I bought it and neither has anyone else I recommend it to. Im 6'3" and the handle length is perfect. A double bit is just a poor design for splitting. Even if your good with one it will get stuck enough to annoy you and wear you faster. Mauls work well and that is what I used before but I can get a lot more done with the Fiskars before getting wore out than with the maul. Lowes has them if you want to check one out in person.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 7:58:44 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By HEIT_APDST:

Be careful with evergreen woods like pine and cedar. They burn really fast and really hot. I only used cedar for kindling.
They are good for starting fires and getting a stove hot quickly but don't load up a stove with pine and walk away. It can ruin the stove or cause a flue fire.
Pine to me isn't even worth the effort, it burns too fast to sustain a long heat-producing fire, it's messy and sappy, and the high amount of resins build up quickly
in your chimney which is dangerous and causes you to have to clean it more often. Seasoned hardwoods are just the way to go, since you're in VA you should
have access to quality firewood.
View Quote
Thank you for both responses. I do have a log that is fairly wide right now. It is pretty sturdy so I will more than likely use that (plus I have been trying to get through it and I am not making any headway so it is also solid! Today, I am going to go try with that and see how it turns out.

I did find that to be true this last winter about the wood. Needless to say our basement was pretty hot! At this point, any wood I stack, I try to let it sit for more than 5 months at least. I have some wood that has been sitting for over 4 years from the previous owner.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 8:01:51 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Skunkeye:
Depends on what you're splitting. I use a couple of gas-powered splitters these days, as Cottonwood can have gnarly grain. I split a piece the other day that was so tough and fibrous with curly grain that the center piece ended up looking like a messed up afro.

For easy straight grain wood, a single or double bit axe will work well. For oak I'd use a maul and wedge, some pieces will split nicely, some will only split with prayer and fasting.

Go watch some Buckin' Billy Ray splitting videos on YouTube, and that barefoot farm girl!
View Quote
Last year I was able to borrow a splitter. It sped up my splitting (which was good because even with the splitter it took me still almost two weeks to get through everything!

I will check out some of those videos and see what they have to say. I have watched a couple of others since I posted this and I saw that many of them circled the log as they stuck it. I am going to try that this go around.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 8:05:48 AM EDT
Thank you for the tool recommendations. I will check out the craftsman Maul and the Friskers at Lowes (I have to go out today anyway). I wish I could get my hands on the x27 before ordering it as a test run but I will base my opinion on what I see on the web.

Lot of great info here. Thank you all!
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 8:38:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/11/2018 8:42:24 AM EDT by XeroSasEnchros]
1. Should I get a splitting ax or stick with a maul (get both is not feesable for me at this time ). Which is more feesable for making the quickest work of the wood? I prefer a maul.

2. What company which is high quality and keeps a sharp blade? top quality and name Gransfors bruks, On a budget Husqvarna (heads made by hulks bruks) and US made Council tools.

3. What is the major points I should consider or advice I should know while I am researching? If you want a composite handle or wood, metal hardness, handle grain orientation, head inline with handle. head has the same thickness of metal on both sides of the heads eye.



I dont like fiskars. I dont like not being able to replace the handle. I get to much friction with composite handles.

Edit also you can usually find awesome deals at flea markets on axes and mauls.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 8:52:49 AM EDT
Just checked lowes. It's actually the 36" length same as the x27. Not sure why they list it as 31.5 or what the difference between the x27 is. If you ever need to replace the handle your probably using it wrong.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 8:59:58 AM EDT
I used an 8lb maul at first, but then got the X27 and could not believe how much easier it split wood, with the added benefit of being much easier on me to use due to the weight difference.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:05:18 AM EDT
I still have use of the Maul. However, the thought that I can go longer without wearing down sooner is also a desire of mine.

I did see the Husqvarna ax (maybe it is a Maul) at my local small engine shop. It looked nice but I may have to look online. They were wanting $100 for it and the handle is not real long. Is that how it is designed?

What is the warranty on these or what should I be looking at? If the handle breaks on a new one, I don't want to have to pay for a new handle right away.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:06:48 AM EDT
I don't think you can break the fiskars. I have missed when tired and hit the rounds full force with just the handle many times with no issue.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:07:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/11/2018 9:13:04 AM EDT by XeroSasEnchros]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By idrtherbspanknthmnky:
Just checked lowes. It's actually the 36" length same as the x27. Not sure why they list it as 31.5 or what the difference between the x27 is. If you ever need to replace the handle your probably using it wrong.
View Quote

No one has ever missed the bit and smacked the handle (especially a beginner) no one has ever sunk the bit in so deep it takes a lot of force to get it out, you never ever have to use a tool outside of its design ramifications and tools don't age either
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:09:21 AM EDT
Good to know about the handles then. I know I try to be extra cautious about my stance and reach so as to make sure the head is what hits and not the handle.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:12:22 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PCBliss:
I don't think you can break the fiskars. I have missed when tired and hit the rounds full force with just the handle many times with no issue.
View Quote
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Attachment Attached File


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Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:13:42 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:15:50 AM EDT
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:17:46 AM EDT
+1 for the Fiskers X-27 splitting axe. I will buy another if I ever break or wear out the one I have. I've split a ton of wood with mine and the edge is holding up extremely well.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:19:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/11/2018 9:20:24 AM EDT by XeroSasEnchros]
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Originally Posted By Jarem08:
Was that covered by warranty?
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Yes but than you're out an axe until they replace it. I guess its just a personnel thing. I would rather just hang it myself and be back to work.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:22:26 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Rdot:
+1 for the Fiskers X-27 splitting axe. I will buy another if I ever break or wear out the one I have. I've split a ton of wood with mine and the edge is holding up extremely well.
View Quote
That is a way tool look at it too. Use it as a disposable tool.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:30:01 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Jarem08:
I still have use of the Maul. However, the thought that I can go longer without wearing down sooner is also a desire of mine.

I did see the Husqvarna ax (maybe it is a Maul) at my local small engine shop. It looked nice but I may have to look online. They were wanting $100 for it and the handle is not real long. Is that how it is designed?

What is the warranty on these or what should I be looking at? If the handle breaks on a new one, I don't want to have to pay for a new handle right away.
View Quote
$100 seems a little steep. Wal-Mart has them for $88 free shipping but you don't get to inspect it. the Husq has a 32" handle. Wood handles have a 90 day warranty. Stripping the lacquer off and treating with boiled linseed oil ($8 for a small can at wal mart or home depot). will give any handle a lot more life.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 9:41:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/11/2018 9:42:27 AM EDT by 7]
I sometimes use an old Maul probably purchased from Home Depot or possibly Hechinger's before it went out of business. Works well on Oak and bounces on GUM trees. Mostly use a 22 ton log splitter now but still maul once in awhile. I have a real itch to go and purchase a Gransfors Brux Splitting Maul but I'm not sure it will handle the wood much better then maul I use now.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 10:04:40 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By madwis15:
I like a maul. Sharp blade on one side, big bad hammer head on the back side for the splitting wedge.
View Quote

Most mauls say not to use them on a wedge.  Sometimes you have to actually read the warnings. 

For massive and extremely hard mesquite, I used to use a maul, but now mostly use a sharp wedge and a 4 lb drilling hammer.  It seems to be less effort. 
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 10:07:30 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/11/2018 10:09:42 AM EDT by wildearp]
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Originally Posted By 7:
I sometimes use an old Maul probably purchased from Home Depot or possibly Hechinger's before it went out of business. Works well on Oak and bounces on GUM trees. Mostly use a 22 ton log splitter now but still maul once in awhile. I have a real itch to go and purchase a Gransfors Brux Splitting Maul but I'm not sure it will handle the wood much better then maul I use now.
View Quote
I have the Gransfors in my Amazon wish list.  I just don't see me ever using my maul very much as I get older.  The wedge and drill hammer work great, give it a try.

I have been using a lifetime warranty Craftsman maul.  It will probably never be replaced again.  So much for buying what used to be a premium tool............

Even my fiberglass handle Craftsman drill hammer needs to have the head re-glued.  In the good times, I could just take it back for a replacement.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 12:00:55 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By XeroSasEnchros:

No one has ever missed the bit and smacked the handle (especially a beginner) no one has ever sunk the bit in so deep it takes a lot of force to get it out, you never ever have to use a tool outside of its design ramifications and tools don't age either
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Originally Posted By XeroSasEnchros:
Originally Posted By idrtherbspanknthmnky:
Just checked lowes. It's actually the 36" length same as the x27. Not sure why they list it as 31.5 or what the difference between the x27 is. If you ever need to replace the handle your probably using it wrong.

No one has ever missed the bit and smacked the handle (especially a beginner) no one has ever sunk the bit in so deep it takes a lot of force to get it out, you never ever have to use a tool outside of its design ramifications and tools don't age either
If the deciding factor for you when choosing an axe is how easy the handle is to replace and not how effective it is at splitting wood then you must be using it wrong.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 12:14:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/11/2018 12:30:21 PM EDT by JohnAdamsIII]
I bought a fiskars 8lb Iso Core maul from home depot and I like it a lot.
You can use an axe but it takes more skill than just smashing through like you do with a maul.

Knowing how to read the wood is also key, use the cracks in the wood as a starting point and work across the round, not random hits all over the place.

Split along side the knots, you'll never get an axe or maul through them.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 12:18:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 3:18:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/11/2018 3:20:08 PM EDT by XeroSasEnchros]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By idrtherbspanknthmnky:
If the deciding factor for you when choosing an axe is how easy the handle is to replace and not how effective it is at splitting wood then you must be using it wrong.
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Originally Posted By idrtherbspanknthmnky:
Originally Posted By XeroSasEnchros:
Originally Posted By idrtherbspanknthmnky:
Just checked lowes. It's actually the 36" length same as the x27. Not sure why they list it as 31.5 or what the difference between the x27 is. If you ever need to replace the handle your probably using it wrong.

No one has ever missed the bit and smacked the handle (especially a beginner) no one has ever sunk the bit in so deep it takes a lot of force to get it out, you never ever have to use a tool outside of its design ramifications and tools don't age either
If the deciding factor for you when choosing an axe is how easy the handle is to replace and not how effective it is at splitting wood then you must be using it wrong.
That’s ridiculous. It’s possible to get a good splitting axe or maul that splits and can last multiple generations without having to go to the manufacture to replace a broken handle. If you want to buy throw away tools that’s on you. I have axes my grandfather used that cut just as good when he used them.
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 10:32:26 PM EDT
You seem like you're on a budget.

I use a 5lb sledge hammer and a grenade style diamond wedge from horrible freight. I can split anything with those. Average sized oak is no problem and I can slug through the gargantuan pieces if need be. I also do not need to rely on natural cracks

I killed the first handle by overstriking. I replaced the handle for about $10. By handle #2 I learned well and no more broken handles
Link Posted: 7/11/2018 11:14:21 PM EDT
I like a maul. If you find a Snow and Neally 8-lb maul with a 36" handle, you will likely be very happy with it.
Link Posted: 7/12/2018 5:20:59 AM EDT
Where in VA?
I may hav an extra maul in my stash
Link Posted: 7/12/2018 6:18:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/12/2018 6:53:29 AM EDT by Rdot]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By XeroSasEnchros:

That’s ridiculous. It’s possible to get a good splitting axe or maul that splits and can last multiple generations without having to go to the manufacture to replace a broken handle. If you want to buy throw away tools that’s on you. I have axes my grandfather used that cut just as good when he used them.
View Quote
The Fiskers handle is extremely durable.. Is that actually your picture of the broken axe? It's all over the web.. Not sure how you managed to break one, unless you just got a bad one. I have generational axes, mauls, and wedges that I sharpen and replace handles on, yet I always grab the Fiskers. Its a high value product that is very good at what it does. Unless I have a major knot, it gives me one swing splits every time and on the rare occasion that I do have a miss I don't have to waste my time replacing a handle. For $40 I'll likely just buy a second one to keep in the shed so I don't have any down time if it ever did break. When I die my son will inherit that second one and it will then be a generational axe.

ETA: If your grandfathers axes work just as well, why did you buy a Fiskers to begin with?
Link Posted: 7/12/2018 7:24:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/12/2018 7:28:23 AM EDT by blwngazkit]
Most of the inexpensive mails have a pretty blunt "blade" and need significant grinding to become useful tool. Mauls are not blunt force instruments, they're a sharp, heavy wedge with a handle.

The Husqvarna mail is nice enough but I prefer the Stihl Pro Splitting maul.

It runs about $100 but has a nice warranty and a metal collar to protect the shaft.

Stihl does have a $50 mail that's perfectly serviceable and sharp, but I prefer the Pro model.


ETA:
Wood helps absorb some of the shock to your hands which is important if you use it a lot. Hickory is strongest and best suited for this application; the Pro model uses a Hickory handle while the standard uses Ash.
Link Posted: 7/12/2018 7:45:19 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Rdot:
The Fiskers handle is extremely durable.. Is that actually your picture of the broken axe? It's all over the web.. Not sure how you managed to break one, unless you just got a bad one. I have generational axes, mauls, and wedges that I sharpen and replace handles on, yet I always grab the Fiskers. Its a high value product that is very good at what it does. Unless I have a major knot, it gives me one swing splits every time and on the rare occasion that I do have a miss I don't have to waste my time replacing a handle. For $40 I'll likely just buy a second one to keep in the shed so I don't have any down time if it ever did break. When I die my son will inherit that second one and it will then be a generational axe.

ETA: If your grandfathers axes work just as well, why did you buy a Fiskers to begin with?
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Originally Posted By Rdot:
Originally Posted By XeroSasEnchros:

That’s ridiculous. It’s possible to get a good splitting axe or maul that splits and can last multiple generations without having to go to the manufacture to replace a broken handle. If you want to buy throw away tools that’s on you. I have axes my grandfather used that cut just as good when he used them.
The Fiskers handle is extremely durable.. Is that actually your picture of the broken axe? It's all over the web.. Not sure how you managed to break one, unless you just got a bad one. I have generational axes, mauls, and wedges that I sharpen and replace handles on, yet I always grab the Fiskers. Its a high value product that is very good at what it does. Unless I have a major knot, it gives me one swing splits every time and on the rare occasion that I do have a miss I don't have to waste my time replacing a handle. For $40 I'll likely just buy a second one to keep in the shed so I don't have any down time if it ever did break. When I die my son will inherit that second one and it will then be a generational axe.

ETA: If your grandfathers axes work just as well, why did you buy a Fiskers to begin with?
Those are splitting axes. Not mine just picks I pulled. I prefer mauls.

I’m just not a fan of Fiskars. I’ve had 1 break on me it was replaced by Fiskars. I gave it to my brother. To each there own.

The axe I inherited is a double bit felling axe he used in Northern California and Washington. Nothing where I live in AL needs an axe that big to fall.

Why do you need a pile of ARs, why do you need a pile of Pistols? The same reason I have a pile of Axes.
Link Posted: 7/12/2018 9:28:49 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By XeroSasEnchros:

Those are splitting axes. Not mine just picks I pulled. I prefer mauls.

I’m just not a fan of Fiskars. I’ve had 1 break on me it was replaced by Fiskars. I gave it to my brother. To each there own.

The axe I inherited is a double bit felling axe he used in Northern California and Washington. Nothing where I live in AL needs an axe that big to fall.

Why do you need a pile of ARs, why do you need a pile of Pistols? The same reason I have a pile of Axes.
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Indeed, to each their own.

Not understanding your bit about piles of guns? I never questioned your needed for multiple axes/mauls/ect. I simply questioned why you bought a fiskers if what you had worked well.
Link Posted: 7/12/2018 10:01:12 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Rdot:
Indeed, to each their own.

Not understanding your bit about piles of guns? I never questioned your needed for multiple axes/mauls/ect. I simply questioned why you bought a fiskers if what you had worked well.
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Originally Posted By Rdot:
Originally Posted By XeroSasEnchros:

Those are splitting axes. Not mine just picks I pulled. I prefer mauls.

I’m just not a fan of Fiskars. I’ve had 1 break on me it was replaced by Fiskars. I gave it to my brother. To each there own.

The axe I inherited is a double bit felling axe he used in Northern California and Washington. Nothing where I live in AL needs an axe that big to fall.

Why do you need a pile of ARs, why do you need a pile of Pistols? The same reason I have a pile of Axes.
Indeed, to each their own.

Not understanding your bit about piles of guns? I never questioned your needed for multiple axes/mauls/ect. I simply questioned why you bought a fiskers if what you had worked well.
Gotcha. I guess I just took it in the wrong way.

My grandfather axe was meant for felling monsters. It’s double bit and heavy. I bought the fiskars for a truck axe.
I ended up not liking the soft metal, the friction/shock in the handle and the handle broke.

I went with a husq multi purpose axe to fill the truck axe roll. I couldn’t be happier.
I enjoy working the wood handle down to fit my hand and handle the shock better.
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