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Posted: 10/24/2013 3:10:28 PM EDT
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.
This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.

Link Posted: 10/24/2013 3:27:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By resteva:


How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.



We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.

This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.



View Quote
I don't know about your area but where I live most of us know how to drop trees, cut, and process wood to heat our homes.



When I say most of us I am referring to those who are actively prepping.



 
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 3:30:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.
This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.

View Quote


I think your being over-dramatic here.  Felling trees and cutting logs will not be anywhere near the biggest problems faced.  

Starting a fire once common matches and lighters are exhausted becomes more challenging and Fire is far easier than food, water, & shelter to be had.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 3:34:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.
This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.

View Quote




We have forgotten how to use an axe in the last 50 years?
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 3:35:54 PM EDT
Trees will disappear far faster than anyone would believe.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 3:54:05 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bones45:


Trees will disappear far faster than anyone would believe.
View Quote


That first winter they will.  People will still be trying to heat three bedroom houses.  Millions will die from it.  Modern construction isn't really suited to woodfire heating.  



But people that live in these areas will probably have at least a passing knowledge of cutting firewood.  Storing food to survive a winter... not so much.



 
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 4:00:35 PM EDT
Its not unusual here.  At least half of hte parcels on my street have about 2 acres of eucalyptus for coppicing.  We are hardiness zone 8, so our winters are mild.  Its not that hard for us to grow enough wood to heat with.  I had a big euc fall across my driveway last winter, and had half a dozen neighbors call and ask if I wanted it chopped up before I could even get home to process it myself.  That was a big friggin tree, knocked a hole in the pavement.  

What I think will be the problem is people not giving the wood time to season before burning it TEOTWAWKI.  Chimney fires will claim a lot of homes in that situation.  

Now, ya'll in cold climates in cities or suburbs?  Yeah, you're probably fucked.  This logically seems like a situation where being rural, or on the edge of rural would be a distinct advantage.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 4:02:51 PM EDT
dig a trench in the yard and fill it with Anthracite Coal, add coal stove to the home....sleep in a tent inside home (next to stove), problem solved for decades (depending on size of coal filled trench).
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 4:07:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.
This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.

View Quote


People that have survived millions of years on this planet will never figure out how to turn wood into heat, they will freeze to death instead
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 4:14:32 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Blackoperations:
dig a trench in the yard and fill it with Anthracite Coal, add coal stove to the home....sleep in a tent inside home (next to stove), problem solved for decades (depending on size of coal filled trench).
View Quote

I have no idea what Anthracite coal is, nor why you would bury it before burning.  I'm sure its a regional thing, we just use trees here.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 4:22:19 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By toadmeister:


I think your being over-dramatic here.  Felling trees and cutting logs will not be anywhere near the biggest problems faced.  

Starting a fire once common matches and lighters are exhausted becomes more challenging and Fire is far easier than food, water, & shelter to be had.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By toadmeister:
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.
This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.



I think your being over-dramatic here.  Felling trees and cutting logs will not be anywhere near the biggest problems faced.  

Starting a fire once common matches and lighters are exhausted becomes more challenging and Fire is far easier than food, water, & shelter to be had.


I agree on over-dramatic... I heat solely with wood and have electric as secondary.  I have enough hand saws to last me a few years...  (plan on adding a few more soon.)  We will be living in our basement only though if I have to heat with only what I can cut by hand.  My last 5 gallon can of gas is dedicated to felling and bucking several trees within walking distance of my house.  My house is very well insulated and we don't use near as much wood as you would think...  It would still be a bear to put up enough by hand.  I think I would probably be lacking calories prior to lacking firewood though.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 4:29:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/24/2013 4:29:55 PM EDT by Rat_Patrol]


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By thederrick106:
I agree on over-dramatic... I heat solely with wood and have electric as secondary.  I have enough hand saws to last me a few years...  (plan on adding a few more soon.)  We will be living in our basement only though if I have to heat with only what I can cut by hand.  My last 5 gallon can of gas is dedicated to felling and bucking several trees within walking distance of my house.  My house is very well insulated and we don't use near as much wood as you would think...  It would still be a bear to put up enough by hand.  I think I would probably be lacking calories prior to lacking firewood though.
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Originally Posted By thederrick106:





Originally Posted By toadmeister:




Originally Posted By resteva:


How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.





We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.


This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.











I think your being over-dramatic here.  Felling trees and cutting logs will not be anywhere near the biggest problems faced.  





Starting a fire once common matches and lighters are exhausted becomes more challenging and Fire is far easier than food, water, & shelter to be had.






I agree on over-dramatic... I heat solely with wood and have electric as secondary.  I have enough hand saws to last me a few years...  (plan on adding a few more soon.)  We will be living in our basement only though if I have to heat with only what I can cut by hand.  My last 5 gallon can of gas is dedicated to felling and bucking several trees within walking distance of my house.  My house is very well insulated and we don't use near as much wood as you would think...  It would still be a bear to put up enough by hand.  I think I would probably be lacking calories prior to lacking firewood though.
Part in red: No joke there. I seen on History channel or something that the lumberjacks of old would EAT on AVERAGE 8k calories a day, and they were trim and VERY fit. They needed AT LEAST that many calories to process that much wood. Even just a few weeks of wood processing would add up FAST.

 






I keep a chainsaw handy, but have axes. Need saws, though. I have been felling trees for years, and have done a few small ones with an axe for shits and giggles.




Edit for spelling.

 
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 4:42:28 PM EDT
Im sure more people dont know how to properly sharpen or re sharpen an axe, let alone re hang one. High quality hand tools should be high on anyone's list. Mechanics tools, gardening, wood processing, etc.

bladeforums and bushcraftusa forums have pretty decent dedicated axe sub forums, and there are many blogs about the subject. A surprising number in fact.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 4:47:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

View Quote


People eventually will burn anything they came find.  There is an interesting pdf describing how some Armenians heat during the winter:

Armenia Burning Manure and Plastic

Note the simple stoves and collection of plastic, cardboard, old shoes, and oil filters as a source of fuel.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 5:02:35 PM EDT
your northem types have it easy...



try cooling off when its 100f and 99 % humidity....while still cutting wood to cook  etc with....



you can always get warm some how,,someway(less being naked outdoors).....most folks over heat(burn to much)... and that will be the down fall on resources....
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 5:16:50 PM EDT
my new cabin / house, or whatever i eventually build on my land, will have a full size functional fireplace, a old school cooking wood stove in the kitchen, to suppliment the gas stove, as well as wood burning stoves in each bedroom.

i am not financing, im paying for everything with cash, so im not going to get worked up over designs, financing issues, or insurance problems. i will build it the way i want, and work around things later.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 5:18:45 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By PATCH5:

I have no idea what Anthracite coal is, nor why you would bury it before burning.  I'm sure its a regional thing, we just use trees here.
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Originally Posted By PATCH5:
Originally Posted By Blackoperations:
dig a trench in the yard and fill it with Anthracite Coal, add coal stove to the home....sleep in a tent inside home (next to stove), problem solved for decades (depending on size of coal filled trench).

I have no idea what Anthracite coal is, nor why you would bury it before burning.  I'm sure its a regional thing, we just use trees here.



Anthracite coal is a convenient, cost-effective way to heat your home. Anthracite coal is clean-burning and efficient.

Only reason to bury it would be for bulk storage of 10's or 100's of tons of coal for long term TEOTWAWKI use.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 5:23:44 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By protus:


your northem types have it easy...



try cooling off when its 100f and 99 % humidity....while still cutting wood to cook  etc with....



you can always get warm some how,,someway(less being naked outdoors).....most folks over heat(burn to much)... and that will be the down fall on resources....
View Quote
You guys burning 5+ cords a winter down there?



 
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 5:42:10 PM EDT

Link Posted: 10/24/2013 5:44:10 PM EDT
while not the long lasting chilling winters of my native New England; Texas can freeze the tits off any Yankee dog a few days out of the year
in Jan Feb and March...
I have 3ac wood lot, a buck saw, ax, hatchets, wood stove, glass fronted fire place etc...living in Northern clime I'd certainly be prepared beyond that..
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 5:51:49 PM EDT
It took a forest to build a ship or a fort.  It took other forests to heat the quarters in the fort.  Some forts in 1700s and 1800s Michigan denuded the landscape for 20 plus miles in all directions.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 6:38:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/24/2013 6:39:03 PM EDT by RABIDFOX50]
SW Florida = no problem with heat. We have it year round. Unless an ice age is part of the festivities.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 12:30:58 AM EDT
I just came upstairs from the basement, throwing a couple more logs (cut, split, stacked and dried myself) into the central wood furnace that is our primary heat source in the winter.

I guess I've been doing it all wrong.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 1:35:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/25/2013 1:37:55 AM EDT by protus]


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sgthoskins:





You guys burning 5+ cords a winter down there?


 
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Originally Posted By sgthoskins:





Originally Posted By protus:


your northem types have it easy...





try cooling off when its 100f and 99 % humidity....while still cutting wood to cook  etc with....





you can always get warm some how,,someway(less being naked outdoors).....most folks over heat(burn to much)... and that will be the down fall on resources....
You guys burning 5+ cords a winter down there?


 






id rather deal with the cold than heat. indoors in most homes even if its in the teens outside will get down to what ..maybe 50f indoors?. hell my old non insulated florida cracker style house  stays 15++f warmer than out side temps! its 52-56f out now. its 65f indoors. coldest indoor temp was 50-51 last year with it being 28f outside.


the cabin i hunted out of in canada (ply wood sides no insulation)...never got that cold indoors even when the wood stove died out in the night..





our house in canukistan  doesnt freeze indoors even when vacant during winter months. you can always wrap up....work..small fires to stay warm shtf.





now that means walking around the house naked if its 45f indoors may be a lil invigorating but thats it! you wont die from it!





down here no power means your stuck with sticky hot no way around it and there is no cooling off (minus cold showers or swimming)....


which is why imho its easier to deal with the cold....like ive told folks for outdoors you can build a fire to stay warm..can you build an AC to cool off......





 
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 1:45:56 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Kopterdoctor:




We have forgotten how to use an axe in the last 50 years?
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Originally Posted By Kopterdoctor:
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.
This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.





We have forgotten how to use an axe in the last 50 years?

Link Posted: 10/25/2013 5:52:55 AM EDT
OP is trying to create a problem that does not exist.  Once you cut a tree, you still need to season (Dry) the wood. Why go to all that time/trouble.  Every neighborhood has several empty houses.  They represent a huge supply of cut, seasoned wood.  Kick down the drywall, kick down a few studs.  Put one end on a window sill and jump on it to break it to length.  Later, you can start on the roof trusses.  Make a nice fire with your lumber.  So simple a caveman could do it <literally>.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 6:26:19 AM EDT
Also, worst case for long term (you did say "TEOTWAWKI"), consider going underground - or more accurately, in-hill or berming.  Building into a hillside so that only one, sun-facing wall is exposed keeps in a lot of heat through thermal mass.  Be smart with ways to radiate the light that comes in and insulate elsewhere and you can stay pretty static year-round.  It'll still be down in the upper-50s/low 60s without some other active heating effort but it's better than freezing.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 7:05:27 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sgthoskins:
I don't know about your area but where I live most of us know how to drop trees, cut, and process wood to heat our homes.

When I say most of us I am referring to those who are actively prepping.
 
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Originally Posted By sgthoskins:
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.
This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.

I don't know about your area but where I live most of us know how to drop trees, cut, and process wood to heat our homes.

When I say most of us I am referring to those who are actively prepping.
 



This. The woodstove/fireplace is the bomb. you can heat/cook/sterilize etc. with it.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 7:12:37 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By buck19delta:
my new cabin / house, or whatever i eventually build on my land, will have a full size functional fireplace, a old school cooking wood stove in the kitchen, to suppliment the gas stove, as well as wood burning stoves in each bedroom.

i am not financing, im paying for everything with cash, so im not going to get worked up over designs, financing issues, or insurance problems. i will build it the way i want, and work around things later.
View Quote




You can certainly do how you please but a wood burning stove in each bedroom is a little much.  3 bedroom house would be 5 chimneys.  I would not want a wood burning stove in the bedroom that I'm sleeping in for a variety of reasons.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 7:14:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/25/2013 7:25:08 AM EDT by ColtRifle]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MarkHatfield:
It took a forest to build a ship or a fort.  It took other forests to heat the quarters in the fort.  Some forts in 1700s and 1800s Michigan denuded the landscape for 20 plus miles in all directions.
View Quote




It also gave you clear fields of fire!
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 8:30:01 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:
You can certainly do how you please but a wood burning stove in each bedroom is a little much.  3 bedroom house would be 5 chimneys.  I would not want a wood burning stove in the bedroom that I'm sleeping in for a variety of reasons.
View Quote


I was thinking the same thing. Our small/medium size woodburner heats the entire house, due to the layout and where I placed the woodburner. There are other reasons I wouldn't want a woodburner in my bedroom as well.

I don't have the tools or ability to buck logs without a chainsaw, though. Splitting could be done, but someone else would have to cut the log to usable lengths.

I have tools to till a garden by hand. That's a plus.

I'm sure I could find someone to do the tilling, and process wood for me in exchange for a roof over their head and a bed to sleep in. Doing that type of labor would kill me sooner than later.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 11:28:10 AM EDT
I grew up in a circa 1880 farm house, two stories with two chimneys.  There were coal grates (small fireplaces) on each side of the chimneys downstairs and a flue for a stove on each side upstairs.  The point being you don't absolutely have to have a chimney for each fireplace.  We used the thermostatically controlled wood stoves, I forget the brand, but with the thermostat turned all the way down they would easily hold fire all night.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 9:32:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 9:34:02 PM EDT by boltcatch]
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available,
View Quote


Not in most places in NJ it isn't.

This is what happens when a lot of people suddenly need firewood:   (link not hot)

http : // www . theguardian.com/world/2010/jan/15/forces-working-against-haiti


Using firewood isn't hard.   Not running out of it can be, depending on where you are.   Don't underestimate the value of good shelter and clothing.

I would suggest having a woodstove if possible and learning how to use it.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 2:02:58 AM EDT


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RPMG:
This. The woodstove/fireplace is the bomb. you can heat/cook/sterilize etc. with it.
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Originally Posted By RPMG:





Originally Posted By sgthoskins:




Originally Posted By resteva:


How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.





We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.


This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.





I don't know about your area but where I live most of us know how to drop trees, cut, and process wood to heat our homes.





When I say most of us I am referring to those who are actively prepping.


 

This. The woodstove/fireplace is the bomb. you can heat/cook/sterilize etc. with it.



I just lit mine off for the first time this season a few hours ago. Spent a bit of time yesterday afternoon cleaning the stove and the pipe. Good thing, it was only 34 outside at 11pm.





Kept our bodies warm and the food hot during last years winter power outage. We're only one of a few (<5) that have them in our neighborhood (~75 houses). Everyone else was freezing their rear ends off and staying at hotels, I just threw another log on while wearing shorts and a t-shirt Used it, cooking-wise, for heating things like soup up. For boiling water we used a swedish alcohol stove.





I helped mom purchase a cooktop woodstove insert for her house last month, she can't wait to start using it too. She ended up staying with us a few nights after I pretty much had to force her to come over, I wasn't about to let a 62 year old woman sleep in an unheated house in the middle of a snowstorm/power outage. The wierd thing was I just about had to drag her over, she didn't want to leave.





I don't give a shit about power hiccups after a hurricane, but cold can kill you quick, and I won't take that chance with my family. It was well worth the investment, plus it's cut my oil consumption by 3/4.




 
 
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 7:11:29 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By RABIDFOX50:
SW Florida = no problem with heat. We have it year round. Unless an ice age is part of the festivities.
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Same here. Keeping cool is the problem here.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 8:18:12 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Bones45:
Trees will disappear far faster than anyone would believe.
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In Sarajevo they ended up digging up coffins to burn for heat after all trees, park benches and scrap wood was burned.
Having said that, the lack of clean water and food is what would end up killing the most people so dont worry that much about it.
I keep enough fuel to make it through the winter in case of a long term blackout or problems with the supply of heating fuel. After that, if things havent gone back to normal after several months then its time to get out of here.
FerFAL
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 8:59:24 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Kopterdoctor:




We have forgotten how to use an axe in the last 50 years?
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Originally Posted By Kopterdoctor:
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.
This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.





We have forgotten how to use an axe in the last 50 years?


Not really but swinging a 4 pound axe hundreds of times does't bode well with the 200 lb. gut hanging off the front of so many out there.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 2:16:51 PM EDT
I have a buddy who will bring over his
log splitter anytime I ask, but I have
chosen to use a go-devil to help
get rid of my gut on my wood supply.
Store lots of good wood now, keep it
dry, and it will last for many years.
We all should be putting back food,
water, ammo, meds, etc.

Good firewood should have equal
priority if you live where you will
need it...

John
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:22:25 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By MikeJGA:
OP is trying to create a problem that does not exist.  Once you cut a tree, you still need to season (Dry) the wood. Why go to all that time/trouble.  Every neighborhood has several empty houses.  They represent a huge supply of cut, seasoned wood.  Kick down the drywall, kick down a few studs.  Put one end on a window sill and jump on it to break it to length.  Later, you can start on the roof trusses.  Make a nice fire with your lumber.  So simple a caveman could do it <literally>.
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Yup...burn treated lumber in an enclosed space...makes sense...
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 5:59:25 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By MikeJGA:
OP is trying to create a problem that does not exist.  Once you cut a tree, you still need to season (Dry) the wood. Why go to all that time/trouble.  Every neighborhood has several empty houses.  They represent a huge supply of cut, seasoned wood.  Kick down the drywall, kick down a few studs.  Put one end on a window sill and jump on it to break it to length.  Later, you can start on the roof trusses.  Make a nice fire with your lumber.  So simple a caveman could do it <literally>.
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Dropping and sectioning a tree would be much less work than dismantling a house.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 6:21:59 PM EDT

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Originally Posted By Wicked1066:





Yup...burn treated lumber in an enclosed space...makes sense...
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Originally Posted By Wicked1066:



Originally Posted By MikeJGA:

OP is trying to create a problem that does not exist.  Once you cut a tree, you still need to season (Dry) the wood. Why go to all that time/trouble.  Every neighborhood has several empty houses.  They represent a huge supply of cut, seasoned wood.  Kick down the drywall, kick down a few studs.  Put one end on a window sill and jump on it to break it to length.  Later, you can start on the roof trusses.  Make a nice fire with your lumber.  So simple a caveman could do it <literally>.


Yup...burn treated lumber in an enclosed space...makes sense...




I've burned dimensional lumber before-- many times.  I Always leave the
flu extra open to keep a good draft going, and don't use it in a
structure that's sealed up tight.  Burns it quicker, but lessens the possibility of being poisoned by the fumes.



I do recognize that there
have been entire families wiped out from burning treated lumber in a
tightly sealed house.  Three, at least, that I know of for sure, from
back in my Colorado days.



 
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 11:35:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/28/2013 11:36:23 PM EDT by Badger545]
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Originally Posted By Wicked1066:


Yup...burn treated lumber in an enclosed space...makes sense...
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Originally Posted By Wicked1066:
Originally Posted By MikeJGA:
OP is trying to create a problem that does not exist.  Once you cut a tree, you still need to season (Dry) the wood. Why go to all that time/trouble.  Every neighborhood has several empty houses.  They represent a huge supply of cut, seasoned wood.  Kick down the drywall, kick down a few studs.  Put one end on a window sill and jump on it to break it to length.  Later, you can start on the roof trusses.  Make a nice fire with your lumber.  So simple a caveman could do it <literally>.


Yup...burn treated lumber in an enclosed space...makes sense...


not sure about your area, but most houses here are framed with untreated wood.... that being said most of the wood for 2x4s and 2x6s are soft pine boards that can't quite compete with burning hardwoods
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 11:42:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/28/2013 11:44:28 PM EDT by midmo]
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Originally Posted By TheOTHERmaninblack:


I've burned dimensional lumber before-- many times.  I Always leave the flu extra open to keep a good draft going, and don't use it in a structure that's sealed up tight.  Burns it quicker, but lessens the possibility of being poisoned by the fumes.

I do recognize that there have been entire families wiped out from burning treated lumber in a tightly sealed house.  Three, at least, that I know of for sure, from back in my Colorado days.
 
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Originally Posted By TheOTHERmaninblack:
Originally Posted By Wicked1066:
Originally Posted By MikeJGA:
OP is trying to create a problem that does not exist.  Once you cut a tree, you still need to season (Dry) the wood. Why go to all that time/trouble.  Every neighborhood has several empty houses.  They represent a huge supply of cut, seasoned wood.  Kick down the drywall, kick down a few studs.  Put one end on a window sill and jump on it to break it to length.  Later, you can start on the roof trusses.  Make a nice fire with your lumber.  So simple a caveman could do it <literally>.

Yup...burn treated lumber in an enclosed space...makes sense...


I've burned dimensional lumber before-- many times.  I Always leave the flu extra open to keep a good draft going, and don't use it in a structure that's sealed up tight.  Burns it quicker, but lessens the possibility of being poisoned by the fumes.

I do recognize that there have been entire families wiped out from burning treated lumber in a tightly sealed house.  Three, at least, that I know of for sure, from back in my Colorado days.
 


Most of the lumber used to build a house is untreated; typically only the bottom wall plates (which can get wet if there is a water leak or something) is treated, if anything.  But it is all usually low-grade softwood (fir or pine) which doesn't make for great firewood.  I would guess the burn rate would probably be pretty close to 'as fast as you can pull it down', so you'll probably spend as much time collecting firewood as you will heating with it.

ETA: Beat by badger!
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 2:33:42 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By buck19delta:
my new cabin / house, or whatever i eventually build on my land, will have a full size functional fireplace, a old school cooking wood stove in the kitchen, to suppliment the gas stove, as well as wood burning stoves in each bedroom.

i am not financing, im paying for everything with cash, so im not going to get worked up over designs, financing issues, or insurance problems. i will build it the way i want, and work around things later.
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Have to admit, I like the way you think sir.

Link Posted: 10/29/2013 2:54:09 AM EDT
Should be plenty of dead fall already considering most won't survive to that point.  Food will be the big issue.
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 6:10:47 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By MikeJGA:
OP is trying to create a problem that does not exist.  Once you cut a tree, you still need to season (Dry) the wood. Why go to all that time/trouble.  Every neighborhood has several empty houses.  They represent a huge supply of cut, seasoned wood.  Kick down the drywall, kick down a few studs.  Put one end on a window sill and jump on it to break it to length.  Later, you can start on the roof trusses.  Make a nice fire with your lumber.  So simple a caveman could do it <literally>.
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Nightfall
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 6:35:23 AM EDT
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.

We are blessed with plenty of forests and fallen trees, wood is readily available, but how many preppers have the know how to utilize this fuel source?  Not many have the required tools to fell trees and cut firewood.
This knowledge is something which has been lost over the decades, maybe it is time we revisited the only source of heating and cooking, after all, solar panels do not last forever.

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Not sure the electric heat in our house even works. It maybe gets used once a year if we arrive home at midnight during a cold night.

No problem to cut wood, split and stack and a few years later burn it in one, two or all three stoves in the house. We normally keep 3 years worth of wood split, stacked and in various states of drying. Right now with all the clearing we did this year, it's more like 5-6 years worth. Recently added another shed that will hold about 3 cords. Normally year we use 1 to 1 1/2 cords.

One of the stoves is a Vermont Bunbaker that has a cook top as well as an oven in the bottom of it. Nice looking stove and not one of the "old maid" looking cook stoves. LP gas provides normal cooking and the tank that also serves the water heater and dryer gets filled once every 2 years. Doubt we will use the dryer in the PAW and the hot water could be cut.

Long term- gas put up with PRI-G will allow us to cut wood well into the future. Logistics to that end include all the normal hand powered tools as well as three Stihl 290's one that is brand new and sits in storage. Spare parts to rebuild one and replacement parts for probably a decade of use along with similar amounts of chains, oil, etc. Have a gas powered log splitter and use it now, not sure how much use it would get in the PAW. Definitely not much till a few years after, and I have to bet that the security situation will be much better a few years into it versus right at the beginning. Long long long term we will probably be back to the axes and bowsaws.

Good insulation and lots of south facing windows allow a lot of passive solar heat to come in.

The other night it got to 36 here, it read 69 in the house in the morning. By mid afternoon it read 76 in the house. It is the south here but it does get cold here.

May eventually add a "Solarsheet" type active solar heating panel. Anyone out there use one?

Lowdown3

Link Posted: 10/29/2013 8:03:34 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By buck19delta:
my new cabin / house, or whatever i eventually build on my land, will have a full size functional fireplace, a old school cooking wood stove in the kitchen, to suppliment the gas stove, as well as wood burning stoves in each bedroom.

i am not financing, im paying for everything with cash, so im not going to get worked up over designs, financing issues, or insurance problems. i will build it the way i want, and work around things later.
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Hey buck19delta, I would suggest getting some professional help with your house design. Finding a house well designed by someone without the right formation is like finding somoene that did surgery on another person without being a doctor, or like taking legal advice from your mailman. There's a tad more to house design that putting windows facing south.. or north.
You will save money in the end by avoiding many common and to a point unavoidable design errors. Rooms too big/ too small and poorly distributed, wasted space, overheating (you sure dont need a wood burning stove in each room!) just to mention some. I'm not even talking about structural problems, and there are many of those, even among architects.
How does the saying go, pay once cry once?  Its your house, you'll spend a LOT of time in it and you dont want to screw it up.
FerFAL
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 11:32:11 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 11:43:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/29/2013 11:44:06 AM EDT by daemon734]
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Originally Posted By JTF:


People eventually will burn anything they came find.  There is an interesting pdf describing how some Armenians heat during the winter:

Armenia Burning Manure and Plastic

Note the simple stoves and collection of plastic, cardboard, old shoes, and oil filters as a source of fuel.
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Originally Posted By JTF:
Originally Posted By resteva:
How do we keep warm in cold weather climes? The gasoline engines no longer have gas to power them, propane is not obtainable and heating oil is a memory.



People eventually will burn anything they came find.  There is an interesting pdf describing how some Armenians heat during the winter:

Armenia Burning Manure and Plastic

Note the simple stoves and collection of plastic, cardboard, old shoes, and oil filters as a source of fuel.



You would be surprised what you would stand around and burn if you get cold enough.

Link Posted: 10/29/2013 1:30:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/29/2013 1:35:43 PM EDT by EXPY37]
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Originally Posted By Rodent:


Dropping and sectioning a tree would be much less work than dismantling a house.
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Originally Posted By Rodent:
Originally Posted By MikeJGA:
OP is trying to create a problem that does not exist.  Once you cut a tree, you still need to season (Dry) the wood. Why go to all that time/trouble.  Every neighborhood has several empty houses.  They represent a huge supply of cut, seasoned wood.  Kick down the drywall, kick down a few studs.  Put one end on a window sill and jump on it to break it to length.  Later, you can start on the roof trusses.  Make a nice fire with your lumber.  So simple a caveman could do it <literally>.


Dropping and sectioning a tree would be much less work than dismantling a house.



Wet wood from tree vs dry wood from house.

Do both...

Chilling sequence of photos in Armenia. Sadly, the direction we're heading since we produce far less than we used to [for export] except production for the comfort and convenience of us Sheeple, that we happily produce.

At least some of the 40% or so working and not helping themselves to free shit, who produce stuff.




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