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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 11/20/2012 9:18:42 PM EST
And they use business radios and have a repeater. They were in the 440-460ish range and I could pick up their communications. I had one of my friends who turns out is a HAM guy with a general license shoot me the repeater outbound frequency but I couldn't hear it. Why couldn't I hear it?

Now for business radios, they work in both VHF in the 150-175 range and the UHF at around where I was. But besides the length of the antenna, how can you tell how each radio is transmitting? I had to eventually just search until I picked up traffic and that was cool, but are there some tips or tricks to do this to make it easier?

also, I had a thought, like if you were on a band and chatting couldn't someone listen as well and if you were on a frequency transmitting data couldn't someone else read the data? And is or is not encryption allowed when transmitting data over the air?

Link Posted: 11/21/2012 3:42:12 AM EST
Originally Posted By NSFJojo:
And they use business radios and have a repeater. They were in the 440-460ish range and I could pick up their communications. I had one of my friends who turns out is a HAM guy with a general license shoot me the repeater outbound frequency but I couldn't hear it. Why couldn't I hear it? Maybe nobody was talkikng? (not trying to be a wise-guy)

Now for business radios, they work in both VHF in the 150-175 range and the UHF at around where I was. But besides the length of the antenna, how can you tell how each radio is transmitting? Do you mean which band? I had to eventually just search until I picked up traffic and that was cool, but are there some tips or tricks to do this to make it easier?

Also, I had a thought, like if you were on a band and chatting couldn't someone listen as well and if you were on a frequency transmitting data couldn't someone else read the data? Yes, absolutely

And is or is not encryption allowed when transmitting data over the air? Encryption is not allowed on the amateur radio bands


Link Posted: 11/21/2012 5:27:45 AM EST
Encryption is not permitted on ham bands, but spread spectrum is. This mode effectively hides your transmission unless you have the specialized
equipment and DS or PN codes to follow the signal.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 12:03:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By ALKVA:
Originally Posted By NSFJojo:
And they use business radios and have a repeater. They were in the 440-460ish range and I could pick up their communications. I had one of my friends who turns out is a HAM guy with a general license shoot me the repeater outbound frequency but I couldn't hear it. Why couldn't I hear it? Maybe nobody was talkikng? (not trying to be a wise-guy) If you heard them on frequencies other than the repeater output then they were using simplex (i.e. direct). If that were the case you wouldn't hear anything on the repeater.

Now for business radios, they work in both VHF in the 150-175 range and the UHF at around where I was. But besides the length of the antenna, how can you tell how each radio is transmitting? Do you mean which band? The radios are most likely programmed as channels. You'd have to either hear them on the air or know how they're programmed to know which band they're using (assuming they're dual-band radios, anyway) I had to eventually just search until I picked up traffic and that was cool, but are there some tips or tricks to do this to make it easier? Find out which frequencies are programmed on each channel and set those frequencies in your HT's memory. You can then scan your memory channels.

Also, I had a thought, like if you were on a band and chatting couldn't someone listen as well and if you were on a frequency transmitting data couldn't someone else read the data? Yes, absolutely If you're talking about Amateur bands then yes, legally speaking. Amateur Radio is open by design. There is no expectation of privacy.

And is or is not encryption allowed when transmitting data over the air? Encryption is not allowed on the amateur radio bands Some say encryption is legal so long as you post the key in an open place. I wouldn't risk it, though.




Link Posted: 11/21/2012 2:58:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By RedHotChiliPepper:

Originally Posted By ALKVA:
Originally Posted By NSFJojo:
And they use business radios and have a repeater. They were in the 440-460ish range and I could pick up their communications. I had one of my friends who turns out is a HAM guy with a general license shoot me the repeater outbound frequency but I couldn't hear it. Why couldn't I hear it? Maybe nobody was talkikng? (not trying to be a wise-guy) If you heard them on frequencies other than the repeater output then they were using simplex (i.e. direct). If that were the case you wouldn't hear anything on the repeater.

Now for business radios, they work in both VHF in the 150-175 range and the UHF at around where I was. But besides the length of the antenna, how can you tell how each radio is transmitting? Do you mean which band? The radios are most likely programmed as channels. You'd have to either hear them on the air or know how they're programmed to know which band they're using (assuming they're dual-band radios, anyway) I had to eventually just search until I picked up traffic and that was cool, but are there some tips or tricks to do this to make it easier? Find out which frequencies are programmed on each channel and set those frequencies in your HT's memory. You can then scan your memory channels.

Also, I had a thought, like if you were on a band and chatting couldn't someone listen as well and if you were on a frequency transmitting data couldn't someone else read the data? Yes, absolutely If you're talking about Amateur bands then yes, legally speaking. Amateur Radio is open by design. There is no expectation of privacy.

And is or is not encryption allowed when transmitting data over the air? Encryption is not allowed on the amateur radio bands Some say encryption is legal so long as you post the key in an open place. I wouldn't risk it, though.






Super helpful. Thank you.

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