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Posted: 3/27/2009 9:22:57 PM EDT
I just wanted to clarify this... Someone please correct me if I am wrong. An heirloom seed has to be open pollinated, but all open pollinated seeds are not heirlooms right? Therefore you do not need an heirloom variety to replant (next year) because all open pollinated seeds will reproduce right?

Thanks
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 7:02:51 PM EDT
Sounds right to me. I don't worry about planting heirlooms, unless there's a quality I want. I DO only plant open pollinated, so I can save the best seeds I saved for the next season. Avoid the hybrids... they'll still reproduce from the seed saved, you just won't get the same results as the parent seeds. My father made a mistake one year and planted 'saved seeds' from some watermelons he just adored... didn't realize they were hybrids... the next summer he had a field of inedible fruits (we call them citrons...) might be good for something... chickens wouldn't eat them... hogs would.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 7:09:38 PM EDT
thanks for the clarification.
Link Posted: 3/28/2009 10:45:08 PM EDT


Lots of seeds are hybrids and the seeds they produce are sterile if they even produce seeds. The hybrids are
breed for resistance to chemical fertilizer and pesticides. The heirlooms will produce usable seeds
and most are much more resistant to disease and mother nature in general.

I use no chemicals and prefer heirloom seeds but also use seeds from USDA.
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 6:56:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thebaldtexican:
Sounds right to me. I don't worry about planting heirlooms, unless there's a quality I want. I DO only plant open pollinated, so I can save the best seeds I saved for the next season. Avoid the hybrids... they'll still reproduce from the seed saved, you just won't get the same results as the parent seeds. My father made a mistake one year and planted 'saved seeds' from some watermelons he just adored... didn't realize they were hybrids... the next summer he had a field of inedible fruits (we call them citrons...) might be good for something... chickens wouldn't eat them... hogs would.


Just wondering? If it's not a hybrid, then wouldn't it be an heirloom? Sorry, not trying to be a smart A, just trying to get clarification.
Link Posted: 3/30/2009 5:11:37 AM EDT
Hi,

Heirloom varieties are identified as having been grown for at least 50 years. All heirlooms are open pollinated. But not all open pollinated varieties are that old.

Some folks try to reproduce historic gardens such as those grown at Colonial Williamsburg, and at Thomas Jefferson's home. They use heirloom varieties that were documented as being grown at the time.

By the way, from what I've learned, all beans are open pollinated. (They self-pollinate before the flower opens.) So we can all plant our long term storage dry beans! Most dry beans in the grocery store are bush type so they can be mechanically harvested. They grow with their pods sticking up. Easier for us to pick too!

Always purchase open pollinated vegetables. When you shop for seeds, avoid words like, "hybrid, F1, New, Improved." The good old varieties grow just as well as the new frankenfoods.

Here's an article regarding "Big Brother" trying to control the food supply. And it's only going to get worse.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/toolbar/#url=http%253A%252F%252Farticles.mercola.com%252Fsites%252Farticles%252Farchive%252F20­09%252F03%252F28%252FSay-Goodbye-to-Farmers-Markets-CSAs-and-Roadside-Stands.aspx

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