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Posted: 3/11/2011 4:36:14 PM EST
For the record I searched "apartment" and came back with nothing.

I'm a single guy. I live in an apartment.. I've got no family that I could reach on a tank of gas, or two for that matter. My only realistic plan is to hunker down in my apartment should the S actually HTF. I've recently accepted the prepper mentality and I'm slowly building up some supplies.

Are there apartment specific considerations that I should be looking at?

What say you on apartment living if S hits the F...?
Link Posted: 3/11/2011 5:12:42 PM EST
Keep a low profile.

If you have firearms and you have tactical cases with lots of pockets that is memorable. The way to counter this is to go to Wal-Mart and get a duffle bag from the sporting goods section. Place the tactical case inside of the non descript duffle bag and it looks like a plain jane duffle bag.

Handgun cases, place them inside of another container. I have used a large flight bag to carry two 4 handgun capacity cases. It looks like soft luggage. Not too memorable.
Link Posted: 3/11/2011 5:13:34 PM EST
What kind of things are you concerned might happen?

Why not make a list of the bad things that could happen and what you could do to prepare for that event.

You might find that you can do a lot.

For instance, one bad thing might be loss of electricity. A flashlight would be a good start for such an event.

Perhaps loss of heat. maybe a small propane heater would help.

Loss of phone service - a cell phone.

Flat tire - a can of fix-a-flat.

Loss of job - savings account.

You get the idea.
Link Posted: 3/11/2011 5:26:05 PM EST
The bad part about living in an aprtment is limited space.
The good thing is your just one person and you can survive with less than a family of 5.

A positive aspect is that if you live in an apartment, there is most likely alot of resources in the way of stores (stay inside for a few weeks, wait till everyone kills each other than go take what you need).

A negative aspect of living in an Apt is you dont have control over the whole building. Rioters light fire to your building and you dont know for some time.
Link Posted: 3/11/2011 6:46:16 PM EST
SHTF plan for Apartment dwellers:
Step 1. GTFO
End of plan.
Link Posted: 3/11/2011 7:01:42 PM EST
I actually felt that my apartment preps were a lot easier than they are now that I have a family. First you don't have to justify your actions to someone you can do it all in the privacy of your own walls. Second your stock pile doesn't need to be as big. I was able to keep most of my food and ammo under a queen sized bed.

The down side is that your in a population dense area so if things go really far south security becomes a issue. I had a plan to get a storage unit and park a loaded trailer in it but never got to that point. My point is have a plan C in case you have to leave.
Link Posted: 3/11/2011 7:10:12 PM EST
I agree that an Apartment is likely the best situation when SHTF. Try to plan for a way to take the key stuff you would need if you had to bug out and that is the same whether you have a house or an apartment. The difference for an Apartment dweller is that it is not your property so less you really need to feel compelled to stay behind to keep secure and defended.

Develop a plan and the plan should include when you would bug in and what you would need to do so. The pan should also include thinking of when it is time to leave and how you would leave and what you could take if you left that way. For example, if you have a full sized truck with a cap you can haul a lot of property. On foot, a backpack sure is more limiting.

Then consider the basics...

Water
Food
Shelter
Security

Long term, I would see if you could buy a piece of land outside of your are where you could bug out to. It could be remote and a place you wouldn't want to live normally but go there to get away some weekends. Well, that is where my plans are if I could only come up with the money and the property at the same time.
Link Posted: 3/11/2011 7:20:43 PM EST
I have an apt and without breaking opsec I have prepped quite well,go to wal mart late at night, live on bottom floor if possible, and always have ramen noodles!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 3/11/2011 7:25:18 PM EST
Originally Posted By VaFarmBoy:
SHTF plan for Apartment dwellers:
Step 1. GTFO
End of plan.


Have somewhere safe to go, and get there fast...........................................
Link Posted: 3/11/2011 7:38:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/11/2011 7:44:45 PM EST by BattletweeteR]
if you are lucky enough to have some sort of hallway, know where to shoot through your wall to hit anybody coming through the door.

oh yeah, his alive buddy may shoot at the spot you just shot through, so move to a 2nd attack postion.

have a few fire extinguishers and a gas mask.

have some sort of improvised door barrier.

have an escape plan.

be smart enough to leave before shit gets real bad.


Link Posted: 3/12/2011 4:16:40 AM EST
Me personally would say go....if it's just you.....find a spot out of town via the shortest route...and store a cashes of supplies to get you somewhere safe.

in an apt....if the power goes.....everyone will know if you have power....and they don't.

aux form of heat is limited to the amount of fuel you can store.

cooking of food will be smelled almost instantaneously.....and once again limited amount of fuel for cooking.

I've lived in apts before.....they are not the most well constructed things out there....unless you plan on not going anywhere.....the door is going to be busted in and your place looted when you aren't there....if OPEC is compromised at all....see above line.

mobile and a place to go would be my advice.....even if you had to split resources with some one you trusted that didn't prepare.....it'd be better than loosing all to a group of zombies.

Just my $0.02....
Link Posted: 3/12/2011 5:01:19 AM EST
So your're not terribly detail oriented. You are not rich nor do you own a car. You live in an Apt. Bldg. You are reasonably fit and have the proper mind-set to prepare. Is there a KISS method for preps? I offer these suggestions for a cheap, bare essentials 30 day prep per person.

FOOD
Store 30 cans of beef stew, 30 cans of mixed veggies, and 30 gal. of water . Do not store any food that requires water to prepare.

LIGHT
1 hurricane lamp and 2 gal lamp oil. The oil burns 1/2 oz per hour. Batteries don't last long enough. Use a flashlight only when you have to search outside.

HEAT
The lamp puts a surprising amount of heat...especially in a small room. Otherwise, have a lot of warm clothing and wool blankets. No fires...too dangerous. Remember ventilation.

SANITATION
5 gal toilet bucket and a box of garbage bags. Toilet paper based on your usage.
Bottle of waterless soap. The stuff mechanics use will do.

HEALTH
Alcohol, pain killers, and bandages(dish towels, pillow cases ,or sheets can be used) to stop any bleeding. Anything more serious will require improvisation.

SECURITY
Throw some 2x4's under the bed. Use them to nail across the door and windows. In a pinch, you can use closet or bathroom doors for the same thing. Also have a hammer, nails, and screw driver on hand. I'm assuming your building will have fire escapes or firestairs for emergency egress.

If possible where you live, have a shotgun for apt. defense, and a concealable high-cap pistol to carry if you have to go outside.

You can assemble this stuff fairly quickly and easily. The food can be rotated into your daily food consumption when you need to replenish. Any SHTF that exceeds your supply will have become TEOTWAWKI. In that case, your are going to have suck it up and start getting out and finding what you need. Just remember to keep a low profile and try to stay out of sight as much as possible.




Link Posted: 3/12/2011 5:06:55 AM EST
Have a fire plan.

I live in an apartment, and Ive posted tid bits over the years on things I'm done and how they are working.

To sum things up, I plan to be on the road with my supplies and if possible my trailer in 30 minutes from the moment I decide to bug out. I solved my storage problem by keeping preps in totes ( stacked up) that I can move quickly out of my unit if I need to. Diversification. Know it. Use it. I keep a shelter, supplies, ammo, mags, in multiple locations to ensure something will survive.

I still havent figured out how to safely store large amounts of fuel when living in an apartment, but I'm working on it.

My biggest problem is finding enough people to band together to get through bad situations. My family and most of my friends live 3,000 miles away, so when I first came over here I was quite alone. I've met a few people on this site and others like it, some became friends, others I just met once. Rome wasnt built in a day. I'm still a work in progress.
Link Posted: 3/12/2011 5:27:38 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2011 5:33:27 AM EST by Flashbang1063]
I too am in an apartment...not a building, but an apartment in a private house. Storage is my main issue so I had to figure on ways to make due with my limited space. I recently posted about food storage in new paint cans using mylar and O2 absorbers. The general consensus is that it may not be the most economical way, 5 gallon buckets being more efficient, but it is a space saver for me. I can fit the paint cans under my bed...I do not have a rodent problem, but I like knowing that they are metal to keep critters out. I am also buying more canned goods that I like to eat so I can store those in the pantry and rotate through them, ensuring that I always have a fresh supply of that as well.

Water was another concern, and any sufficient amount of water is a huge space eater. I keep a few store bought gallon containers in a closet and just picked up two Berkey Black filters to use with two 5 gallon buckets. For $99 I have a water purification system that will last years.

As a side note, I am renting a storage space for furnature and other items I retained from my divorce...stuff that will eventually be used when I can buy another house. I have decided to fill some 5 gallon buckets as well and store them there.

I also have a GOAL Zero solar battery charger on order to keep my flashlights and other battery powered items going as long as there is still a sun in the sky. A deitz lantern is sitting on my end table....works great and doesn't look like its out of place being out in the open.
Link Posted: 3/12/2011 6:16:24 AM EST
Apartment Preps;

PRIORITY 1: Renters Insurance, then photos to back it up on a thumb drive in your car or workplace.

PRIORITY 2: Water, fresh and gray if possible. Means to purify same without power. A bucket to haul gray water to your apartment from outside.

PRIORITY 3: Fire extinquisher (extra for your apartment) to head off any mistakes with flame during services outage.

Otherwise, it's the same as any place else.

For long term, consider the "run for the hills" option. Even though that is a bad option, over long term SHTF the chances your neighbors set the place on fire (and without sprinkler pressure you are in deep trouble) approaches probablity of 1. The risk goes down for fewer units in the place.

Know how to get your vehicle out of your parking area when there is no power.

Keep your gas tank half full ALL the time as you are not going to store cans of gas safely anywhere.

That, and try not to live in an apartment if you can afford to go elsewhere. Try not to have room-mates either, they destroy OPSEC.

It helps to also keep your neighbors a little afraid of you. ;)
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 6:03:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By elvis1974:
live on bottom floor if possible


While living on the bottom floor does allow you to bug out through a window a little easier, it also makes it easier for thieves to get in your place. I don't like basement apartments at all because of the potential for flooding, although I lived in a couple of basement apartments over the years.

There are good things about apartments. Having people around all the time adds a layer of security. Having people around all the time in a larger complex means it is hard to know who actually belongs there or not.

There are good and bad things about everything, and in the end it is about what suits you and your lifestyle. Some people do not like to live in the same place for any length of time and apartments are nice for them because they can pack up and move if they want to much easier than can someone who has bought something.

And if you live in a rental and the neighborhood goes down hill, you can just leave. You have nothing invested that ties you to the place.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 6:24:45 AM EST
A lot depends on the area:

Are you in a place where natural disasters, like hurricanes or earthquakes, are likely?

What is the lowest temperature you're likely to have to deal with?

Are you in an urban area, a suburban one, a rural area? What is the geography like where you are? What is the population? What natural resources exist in the area.

Do you live in a large complex or is it a divided house? What are the other residents like?

You say you don't have family, but do you have friends nearby you could count on for emergencies? If your apartment building catches fire or is destroyed in a tornado, or you are without heat or power for several days due to some sort of storm, do you have friends you could bunk with for a while? What about longer term?

There are a ton of scenarios that don't involve meter strikes or zombies that you should be prepared for.

You need to know where you are before you can decide how to get where you're going.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 7:15:24 AM EST
Protus is the resident apartment expert, search on his posts for a wealth of information. Much of it is already posted, he goes into much more depth.

Ops
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 7:55:44 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/13/2011 7:59:11 AM EST by Rapidfire_85]
I am not sure where you live in ND, but some areas are flood prone, all areas are cold, and just about any place on the planet can lose power. Plan for most likely event first. Heat preps is up to you, just don't burn your entire complex down....blankets are safer than candles!

Renters insurance is a must, it is dirt cheap. You can always sit down with your agent to talk about how claims are handled so you know how to prepare if you are not sure how it works. Renters insurance does not cover floods (applies if you are on 1st floor, or have a garage with stuff in it).

In my apartment I have been through power outages(no heat), having no water, and having no hot water(more of an inconvenience).

No water/hot water:

Go buy one of these($~20) from Walmart today
http://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Aqua-Tainer-Gallon-Container/dp/B001QC31G6

Buy a bottle of this($8) from Walgreens today edit:This stuff rocks, 100x better than a baby-wipe bath. You actually feel and smell like you showered, not just wiped your filth around with a scented wipe.
http://www.amazon.com/No-Rinse-00200-Shampoo-16/dp/B00008KA7P/ref=sr_1_cc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1300034529&sr=1-1-catcorr

Buy this($30) from Walmart and 2 cans of fuel($6)
http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000004124-PefectFlow-1-Burner-Stove/dp/B0009PUR5E/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1300034746&sr=1-2-catcorr


Also pickup a 24pack of water bottles ($4) while you are at wally-world. Now you have water and fuel to drink/cook with for up to 7 days, and you won't smell/feel like a homeless person.

What I listed above is around $65, the cool thing is that you can use it all while backpacking, or doing other outdoor related activities. The ability to warm water for washing your face, cooking, and knowing that you will have enough water at home to get through most 'events' is reassuring.

Don't get overwhelmed by 'prepping' I think that people get ahead of themselves buying all kinds of 'cool' gear.

http://www.ready.gov/america/getakit/index.html

Ready.gov outlines a basic kit. I look at it as a bare minimum expectation for every household in America. The sad thing is that in reality, that level of preparedness is not the case.





Link Posted: 3/13/2011 8:05:22 AM EST
I lived in a bottom floor apt for a while...good if you have a heavy gunsafe to get inside, but I got tired of worrying about crooks breaking in through any window or pulling out my window AC. I vote for the second floor...safe enough to hang and jump if you have to, but no visitors. Apt life blows because of the fire hazards...stupid neighbors will be running a hibachi in their living room as soon as the power goes out.

I think this scenario lends itself to a little more emphasis on a vehicle/trailer, so you can get out in a hurry.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 9:52:40 AM EST
My apt says I can store flamables such as propane and such as long as it is in one of those flammable lockers,where can I buy one and how huch? BTW I also live on the first floor so this thing would be out on the patio bolted down.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:25:28 AM EST
Originally Posted By elvis1974:
I have an apt and without breaking opsec I have prepped quite well,go to wal mart late at night, live on bottom floor if possible, and always have ramen noodles!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


If you live on bottom floor your 75% more likely to boken into than a second or third floor apt.
It has advantages yet disadvantages to being on the ground floor.
Second floor is my choice if I have one.
somethings to think about.
Bottom floor
1) Easy to move in and out of / and easier to get broken into...catch 22.
2) Quick access to vehicle and loading things if you have to leave quickly.
3) Everyone can see inside your apt if you leave your blinds open..and see your preps if you are working or doing something with them...IE..moving them to your room or stacking them in a closet, cleaning your guns, repairing gear..ect. you get the point.

Second,Third, and Fourth Floor
1) Harder to get access to, for breaking in , but you are off ground level and thus, are passed by punks that wanna easy target.
2) You can see who is coming up the stairs or down the street easier than on the ground floor.
3) You have a better chance of hearing, if you need a heads up for a SHTF.
4) You need a rope and will have to throw things down to your vehicle to get out quickly.
5) Takes you longer to get out if you have to use stairs or elevator.
6) Your not as easily seen in your Apt doing things with preps if you have the window or blinds open...except for the neighbors that are on the sane level as you across the street or higher.
7) If you have a balcony or parking close to your Apt. you could in a SHTF just throw everything out the window into a truck bed and use a rope ladder to climb down right into your vehicle...which helps to keep eyes on preps and people that might be out and about.

There are several other things that you should also think about, like size of Apt. complex and the type of people that are living there.
I hope this gives you some ideas and thought for selecting an Apt.
Also many have a storage area, under or in small garage storage space, do not use this for your preps, every person in the complex can then see what you have and all they need is to break your lock and then you just preped for them

Hope that this helps.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:32:22 AM EST
When looking for an apartment, one of the best things you could do is find one with an attic above it. Many garden apartment type buildings are stick built with 2-3 floors and typical pitched roofs meaning the top floors have access to the attic.

This is how the condo that I bought is setup, I have an attic that is 30'X30". I am over 6 foot tall and I could walk without hitting my head the entire length (30') by 12'. So the 12' strip down the middle could be used for just about anything, while the 9' on each side where the roof gets too low to walk can be used for storage.

Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:45:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/13/2011 10:47:27 AM EST by SALTDOG]
Originally Posted By Tradesman:
When looking for an apartment, one of the best things you could do is find one with an attic above it. Many garden apartment type buildings are stick built with 2-3 floors and typical pitched roofs meaning the top floors have access to the attic.

This is how the condo that I bought is setup, I have an attic that is 30'X30". I am over 6 foot tall and I could walk without hitting my head the entire length (30') by 12'. So the 12' strip down the middle could be used for just about anything, while the 9' on each side where the roof gets too low to walk can be used for storage.



The heat could be a problem in the heat of summer and the cold in the dead of winter, for SOME preps.
If you are renting, the maintance guys check the duct work(plus if a neighbor isn't getting enough heat or A/C, the attic duct work is one of the first things that they check once the unit is deamed OK) and fire systems every 6 months along with replacing your Smoke and Carbon Dioxide detectors, Many Apt. complex's have an annual inspection of the units for insurance reasons and this is done by the maintance guys when they change above said batteries.
They look in every room and bathroom, to make sure that there are no problems than are visible, they are in and out in 5 min. but if you have stuff out, they will see it and thus OPSEC in then broken.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 10:50:13 AM EST
Originally Posted By SALTDOG:
Originally Posted By Tradesman:
When looking for an apartment, one of the best things you could do is find one with an attic above it. Many garden apartment type buildings are stick built with 2-3 floors and typical pitched roofs meaning the top floors have access to the attic.

This is how the condo that I bought is setup, I have an attic that is 30'X30". I am over 6 foot tall and I could walk without hitting my head the entire length (30') by 12'. So the 12' strip down the middle could be used for just about anything, while the 9' on each side where the roof gets too low to walk can be used for storage.



The heat could be a problem in the heat of summer and the cold in the dead of winter, for SOME preps.
If you are renting, the maintance guys check the duct work(plus if a neighbor isn't getting enough heat or A/C, the attic duct work is one of the first things that they check once the unit is deamed OK) and fire systems every 6 months along with replacing your Smoke and Carbon Dioxide detectors, Many Apt. complex's have an annual inspection of the units for insurance reasons and thins is done by the maintance guys when they change above said batteries.
They look in every room and bathroom, to make sure that there are no problems than are visible, they are in and out in 5 min. but if you have stuff out, they will see it and thus OPSEC in then broken.


In my building, there is no common mechanical or electrical in the attics. No smoke alarms either. As an electrician, I have found myself in many apartment and condo attics and usually there is very little in the way of common elements in the attics, it's usually ran thru the basement.

Either way, it's better to have the space up there than not have it. Anything that you want to keep hidden could easily be stores in large containers or those inespensive standup closets.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 11:07:00 AM EST
Originally Posted By Tradesman:
Originally Posted By SALTDOG:
Originally Posted By Tradesman:
When looking for an apartment, one of the best things you could do is find one with an attic above it. Many garden apartment type buildings are stick built with 2-3 floors and typical pitched roofs meaning the top floors have access to the attic.

This is how the condo that I bought is setup, I have an attic that is 30'X30". I am over 6 foot tall and I could walk without hitting my head the entire length (30') by 12'. So the 12' strip down the middle could be used for just about anything, while the 9' on each side where the roof gets too low to walk can be used for storage.



The heat could be a problem in the heat of summer and the cold in the dead of winter, for SOME preps.
If you are renting, the maintance guys check the duct work(plus if a neighbor isn't getting enough heat or A/C, the attic duct work is one of the first things that they check once the unit is deamed OK) and fire systems every 6 months along with replacing your Smoke and Carbon Dioxide detectors, Many Apt. complex's have an annual inspection of the units for insurance reasons and thins is done by the maintance guys when they change above said batteries.
They look in every room and bathroom, to make sure that there are no problems than are visible, they are in and out in 5 min. but if you have stuff out, they will see it and thus OPSEC in then broken.


In my building, there is no common mechanical or electrical in the attics. No smoke alarms either. As an electrician, I have found myself in many apartment and condo attics and usually there is very little in the way of common elements in the attics, it's usually ran thru the basement.

Either way, it's better to have the space up there than not have it. Anything that you want to keep hidden could easily be stores in large containers or those inespensive standup closets.

Thats true and all building are not the same, I put that out there because it was like that in several that I had lived in over the years, I have also owned a few houses but It is easier to prep for 1 in an apt, than it is for a family...I just hope that he is able to see things that he might not of saw or thought of before.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 12:09:50 PM EST
My apt is on the ground floor at the back of the building so the only thing that is behind me is a tree line,I have a prep room,but in my prep room I have a heavy black out curtain over the window no light in or out, Plus as stated in a previous post I work for the .Gov and wear a badge so most of my neieghbors are worried I am gonna bust them for something anyway, also my place hace an alarm system which has a battery back up just in case,how long does that last I dont know plus I have installed other security measures.Hey it pays to watch the best defense!
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 8:12:25 AM EST
For the record I'm moving to Tuscon, AZ in the fall. My current apartment is 3rd floor(top floor). I like the fact that I don't have to listen to anyone above me. For that reason I prefer top floor. I will look into fire escape stuff though for sure.
Thanks for all the info. There is some info here that I had not thought of.
Keep it coming!
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