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Posted: 10/26/2013 1:56:56 AM EST
Trying to decide on how to setup a simple rain catch system. Really dont like the idea of having multiple barrels connected with a manifold system.
So its either block off some of the downspouts to funnel the rain into one spout and use a larger tank, or use multiple smaller tanks near 2 or more downspouts.
Or, just a single 55gal drum at each downspout, and jet let the excess run off.



Link Posted: 10/26/2013 2:10:50 AM EST
I think I just discovered what I want to use - plastic totes. Already has spigots and 275 gallon capacity. Could get 2 or more for placing near more than one downspout.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:14:40 AM EST
I cannot stress this enough, CHECK YOUR LOCAL LAWS!! some states and counties have laws reguarding what falls on your property. no joke. The local county or state SELLS the rain that falls to another state, your property taxes are often times based on this (AE grass which absorbs the rain is taxed heavily but a driveway which promotes runoff is negative tax).
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:49:51 AM EST
This is why I love Minnesota. Water water everywhere, lets all have a drink. such a crucial element to life that I dont want heavily regulated and taxed.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 8:00:03 AM EST
If blocking off downspouts a good downpour might overflow your single downspout.

I would have stuff on several downspouts just because of this.

If designing a system from the get go then you could size things to work alright and I would not mind one monster container for all downspouts to feed to.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:10:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 9:12:54 AM EST by DogWizard]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By fsjdw2:
I cannot stress this enough, CHECK YOUR LOCAL LAWS!! some states and counties have laws reguarding what falls on your property. no joke. The local county or state SELLS the rain that falls to another state, your property taxes are often times based on this (AE grass which absorbs the rain is taxed heavily but a driveway which promotes runoff is negative tax).
View Quote



Luckily, the OP is in Texas so unless you have some oddball local restriction, you should be good to go. Not only is rain harvesting allowed, it's encouraged, and even HOA's cannot restrict it (but you may have to screen your barrels).

http://www.twdb.state.tx.us/innovativewater/rainwater/faq.asp


I prefer a single collection location - easier to access and keeps a lower profile - I run dual 55G barrels at a single spout location.





Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:49:39 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By fsjdw2:
I cannot stress this enough, CHECK YOUR LOCAL LAWS!! some states and counties have laws reguarding what falls on your property. no joke. The local county or state SELLS the rain that falls to another state, your property taxes are often times based on this (AE grass which absorbs the rain is taxed heavily but a driveway which promotes runoff is negative tax).
View Quote


And some people still think we can turn this country around. No wonder we end up with so many ridiculous gun laws, we have people that are scared to collect rain that falls on their land for fear a .gov bureaucrat is going to penalize them. Our founding fathers would bitch slap the majority of "men" in this Country.

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Link Posted: 10/26/2013 5:31:54 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 5:41:59 PM EST
My gutter system is all piped together and runs under ground via a 4" pvc out spout a few feet bellow my house/grade... I have a platform built so I can put a bucket under it and rotate 5 gallon buckts to a larger holding barrell if needed.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 5:49:56 PM EST
is water off a shingle roof potable...or can it be made potable?
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 10:32:27 AM EST
My parents have a shingle roof and a cistern and drink that water.

Run some searches on cisterns and good practices. Basically you would do well to let the rain clean the roof a bit if you have not had a rain for a while. My parents have a pressure tank and filter in their system for getting stuff out.

I don't think theirs really does much to let the first bit of rain water get dumped to the yard but I never did more than replace filters and the pressure tank on it in the past.

I do know if can be drained and there is a manhole cover so you could go down in it to clean it out if needed.

I personally would prefer a metal roof I think.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:04:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 2:06:57 PM EST by KeithC]
Biere voiced my only concern, that a blocked system would lead to wasted opportunity to collect more water. I'd go with some container at ever downspout.

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bmw20:
[W]e have people that are scared to collect rain that falls on their land for fear a .gov bureaucrat is going to penalize them. Our founding fathers would bitch slap the majority of "men" in this Country.
View Quote


Meh. Our founding fathers took a common household product - home-distilled whisky - and made it illegal to produce without having first paid a tax to a .gov bureaucrat. When farmers refused, Washington led Federal troops against them to force them to comply (adding link in case any readers don't know what I'm talking about - Whiskey Rebellion

Part of "surviving" is being able to accurately assess the risks inherent in your plan of action. This includes knowing that something as simple as leaving a bucket out in a rainstorm could expose you to unwanted attention.
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